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Hydra 40 internal filters

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I would not use internal filters, especially with goldfish. These are the reasons why:
 

  1. Internal filters trap waste within the aquarium. This means that should the filter turn off, the waste can flow remarkably freely back into your tank. The filter's job, mainly, should be to remove waste from the tank and not let it back in. IMO this is where internal filters fail as filters.
  2. It takes up water space. Water displacement happens with everything you add into an aquarium. This ranges from substrate, to decor, to plants. The more water you lose, the less there is for the fish. With a goldfish, you want the most water possible. An internal filter is something that will impede that goal unnecessarily. 
  3. Internal filters are not as efficient. While they may remove some of the bulkiness from the outside of the aquarium, they do not often run quite as efficiently as an HOB or a canister filter. This is why they are not often marketed as primary filters, but as supplementary filtration to an existing HOB or canister.

I've had a bit of experience attempting to run internal power filters on several different aquariums, with several different types of fish. Not once did it ever keep anything in super shape, and did almost nothing compared even with a cheap HOB that was under-rated for my tank. You're better off not wasting your money.

Edited by ChelseaM

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I would not use internal filters, especially with goldfish. These are the reasons why:

 

  • Internal filters trap waste within the aquarium. This means that should the filter turn off, the waste can flow remarkably freely back into your tank. The filter's job, mainly, should be to remove waste from the tank and not let it back in. IMO this is where internal filters fail as filters.
  • It takes up water space. Water displacement happens with everything you add into an aquarium. This ranges from substrate, to decor, to plants. The more water you lose, the less there is for the fish. With a goldfish, you want the most water possible. An internal filter is something that will impede that goal unnecessarily. 
  • Internal filters are not as efficient. While they may remove some of the bulkiness from the outside of the aquarium, they do not often run quite as efficiently as an HOB or a canister filter. This is why they are not often marketed as primary filters, but as supplementary filtration to an existing HOB or canister.
I've had a bit of experience attempting to run internal power filters on several different aquariums, with several different types of fish. Not once did it ever keep anything in super shape, and did almost nothing compared even with a cheap HOB that was under-rated for my tank. You're better off not wasting your money.
I Understand the usual problems with internal filters, but this thing claims to almost instantly control ammonia levels.

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Something that sounds too good to be true often is.

 

The ways a filter can control ammonia levels are as follows:

 

  1. chemical filtration - this can be an ammocarb carbon cartridge, or some other ammonia-controlling money-sucking replacement for a good cycle. They often have to be changed out or recharged, and do the same thing that a properly cycled filter should take care of in the first place.
  2. Simply using a cycled filter - A cycled filter (read: Nitrogen cycle) is populated with the bacteria that will take care of ammonia at a rate suited for the aquarium. The link I provided will tell you more about that and what needs to happen for it to get there.

Anything that claims to be an instant-fix with fish often is not. I would do research to understand why they make such a claim and what they have to back it up first.

Edited by ChelseaM

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Something that sounds too good to be true often is.

 

The ways a filter can control ammonia levels are as follows:

 

  • chemical filtration - this can be an ammocarb carbon cartridge, or some other ammonia-controlling money-sucking replacement for a good cycle. They often have to be changed out or recharged, and do the same thing that a properly cycled filter should take care of in the first place.
  • Simply using a cycled filter - A cycled filter (read: Nitrogen cycle) is populated with the bacteria that will take care of ammonia at a rate suited for the aquarium. The link I provided will tell you more about that and what needs to happen for it to get there.
Anything that claims to be an instant-fix with fish often is not. I would do research to understand why they make such a claim and what they have to back it up first.
t

Thanks for your input. They seem to be ok as a secondary filter. There are a few videos on YouTube about them. I ve often wondered why something like this hasn't been available before with the technology we have access to. If I get one I'll let you know my findings.

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