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Want to Move Callie Back to 55 Gal


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When we moved we just put Callie in the smaller 30 gal. since her tankmates died off. It was just the quickest and easiest thing to do at the time she was already stressed. That was back at the end of March. I think I want to move her back to the 55 gal. She has some trouble making a turn in the smaller tank with her huge long tail and winds up going on her side especially when she goes into feeding frenzy. I don't want her to hurt herself since she is my last fish. She's a good 5-6" long from end to end.

 

Right now she has a 30 gal, no stones (bare bottom), 110 AC HOB and a bubble hose along the back bottom. We had the 110 plus a 70  on the 55 before but it doesn't fit well with the cover and light section and makes so much noise even with a full tank. 

 

I have a new cannister system that I have never used.We bought it for the 55 because of the noise of the HOB's. I have a few questions about starting over. 1) Is the cannister enough or should I also use a small HOB with it for 1 fish? 2) If I add another fish what about filtration? 3) Other than cleaning the old tank squeaky clean what else should I do? 4) I'm assuming you have to get the tank to cycle before adding her back. How do I get the tank to cycle with no one in it and how long does it take?  5) Can someone give me a step by step so I don't mess this up and Kill her? Thanks. :gfish:

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What canister is it?  Make and model.  If your tank is adequately filtered for one fish (10X filtration for HOBs or 5-7X filtration for canisters), you should be OK adding another fish.  Having said that, because of the increase in bioload, you will most likely see a bit of a cycle bump unless the new fish is tiny.  :teehee

 

I don't know what else you'd have to do other than clean the tank.  It's not the tank that is cycled, it's the filter.  So move her along with her current filter and you should be set.  I would test for ammonia and nitrite for the first week or so to see if you get any kind of bump as some of the BBs do live on the tank wall . . . .

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To cycle the new tank just move the existing filter into the new tank along with the canister filter, the bubble hose, and Callie.   The filter in the 30 gallon now has all the biobugs needed to handle the waste produced by Callie.  Watch ammonia and nitrite for the first couple of weeks to make sure you don't get a "cycle bump."

 

Please give us the make and size of the canister.  I doubt you will need another filter, but this information will make us sure.

 

When you decide to add a fish, after quarantine just put the fish in the tank with Callie.  Once again , watch ammonia and nitrite for a couple of weeks.  

 

Sniped by Lisa.  

 

Actually, one can usually add another fish without a cycle bump.  A bacterial colony with a good food supply will continue to multiply until it is on the edge of starvation (stationary phase, if you recall the bacterial growth curve).  Most of the colony members get enough food to keep alive, a few lucky ones land a spot where they thrive and multiply, and a few starve. Doubling their food supply gets them all thriving until the population boom gets them back to stationary phase.

Edited by shakaho
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Should I try to move as much water from the smaller tank as possible to the larger tank?  The cannister is a Fluval 306 model  for 70 gal/300L. If I get funky water readings how soon should I do a water change after moving her or will that mess up the cycle I have already too much?

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I couldn't find how many gph the filter is rated for but either way if it was me I'd run an HOB along with it.  That way if one filter dies, you've got one running still.  

 

You don't need to move any of the water from the old tank to the new.  The LARGE majority of your cycle will be in the filter you move.  The only reason I'd suggest using some old water is if you have a large difference in tap vs tank pH.

 

If your total ammonia + nitrite gets to over 1.0, then do a large WC.  If ammonia + nitrite is less than 1, you can add Prime (I'd double dose it), and test again in 24 hours.  If you do start to see nitrite, also add 1 tsp salt per 10 gallons.

 

Sharon I guess I was thinking of when I moved Waddles (80 g) into the 20 gallon with Finley (10 g) along with a bit of media from the main tank. :peeka  I still ended up with a bit of a cycle bump.  :lol2  It lasted about a week with nitrite reaching 1 ppm at one point . . .  I did WCs daily for a  few days.  It usually doesn't take long.  Thank goodness cuz we were leaving for vacation.  I was getting *slightly* panicky.  :rofl

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Great data Lisa.  If you increase your bioload by 800% while only transferring a bit of medium, you can expect a week-long cycle bump.

 

:lol:

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Great data Lisa. If you increase your bioload by 800% while only transferring a bit of medium, you can expect a week-long cycle bump.

:lol:

You're not making fun of me, are you? :o. I was trying to be all scientific. :lol

:tomuch:

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I think I'll go with the 70 Aquaclear HOB it fits better inside the canopy thingie- the 110 is tight and vibrates like crazy making a horrible racket. Plus the cannister.  The tap water is actually a little better pH than the tank/treated water and I've got plenty of Prime; brand new bottle. My ammonia has still been running a bit high in the smaller tank so I'm thinking it could actually be a plus moving to the larger one?  

 

Also, thinking of getting some plants. Should I wait a bit until I know everything has gone okay or is it okay to do plants right away? Would it freak her out too much to add plants?  I thought it might give her some places to hang out and not feel so alone. Bare bottoms are kind of boring now that she's by herself. Any suggestions on a type of plant she won't gobble up?

 

Gosh, I'm a nervous Nellie! :scared

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No, the media from the 70 went into the 110 and I added more white pad and bio tubes to fill the 110.  I could run the 110 and add the 70 and cannister until the water establishes right ?  Meaning I could run all three and then drop the 110 later on. Then replace the glass cover and light canopy later once everything stabilizes. Could i add some live bacteria to help things along or is it just a waste of time/money?

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I think I'll go with the 70 Aquaclear HOB it fits better inside the canopy thingie- the 110 is tight and vibrates like crazy making a horrible racket. Plus the cannister. The tap water is actually a little better pH than the tank/treated water and I've got plenty of Prime; brand new bottle. My ammonia has still been running a bit high in the smaller tank so I'm thinking it could actually be a plus moving to the larger one?

Also, thinking of getting some plants. Should I wait a bit until I know everything has gone okay or is it okay to do plants right away? Would it freak her out too much to add plants? I thought it might give her some places to hang out and not feel so alone. Bare bottoms are kind of boring now that she's by herself. Any suggestions on a type of plant she won't gobble up?

Gosh, I'm a nervous Nellie! :scared

Well, Anubias, java fern and swords are time-tested standbys for goldfish. However, not all goldfish eat plants, and you won't know until you put some in ... so feel free to try anything you like. If they do eat it, it'll just be a tasty snack. :)

As for me, I have Anubias barteri diamond, lace java fern, rose sword, melon sword, red Ludwigia, dwarf sagittaria and Cyperus helferi. My goldfish have never so much as disturbed my plants, but this might be unusual. :) However, many plants won't thrive without special considerations like lighting, fertilizers and carbon ... so if you want to start with something that doesn't require all that, I'd go with Anubias. They're virtually indestructible! If you want to keep your tank bare bottom, you could tie plants that have rhizomes (like Anubias and java fern) to a piece of driftwood or Super glue them to rocks, or use potted plants.

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