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Fluidised Sand Filters


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  • Regular Member

Hi Everyone, I have just learned of Fluidised Sand Filters. From what I have been reading they sound like a good idea and seem to be very efficient. :) I was wondering if this type of filter would be a good filtering system for my 300 liter (79 gallon) aquarium. I have two internal power filters in my goldfish tank at the moment but I am looking for a more efficient internal filter.

 

Does anyone have any thoughts on the suitability of an internal fluidised sand filter for my tank? If this sort of filter in a good idea what sized filter would I need for my tank? Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

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  • Regular Member

Are you planning to DIY or buy?   I found a nice description of them here.  Moving bed filters are generally very efficient.

 

 has many variations on DIY moving bed filters including fluidized. Edited by shakaho
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  • Regular Member

I googled "fluidized sand filters au" and got these sources:

 

https://www.aquariumproducts.com.au/fluid_bed_filters.php

 

http://www.aquariumsupermarket.com.au/home/884-otto-fluidized-bed-filter.html

 

I also found this article that points out a disadvantage of these filters at the end.  

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  • Helper

They are excellent but weak on mechanical filtration, and function best as a secondary filter. They're hard to beat for biological, putting a sponge filter on the intake to one OR running it in line on the return of a canister filter are the best ways to have them, since the beds can clog with mulm and function less efficiently otherwise :)

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  • Regular Member

Wow thank you every one for your help.

 

I would prefer to have just the one filter inside my tank. The tank is in my dining room and I am trying not to have things hanging outside the tank. I would put a large sponge on the intake to keep the inside material as clean as possible. I already do two 90% water changes a week because the internal power filters keep the water clean but do not filter out all the poop my three largish goldfish produce. I realise no filter could keep up with three active goldfish's output.

 

Is someone able to direct me to a site that shows how to calculate the size of filter I would need for my 79 gallon tank?

 

Thanks again everyone I appreciate you taking the time to help me and for your expert opinions

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  • Helper

I'd recommend the smallest TMC fluidized sand bed filter, myself. It will more than keep up with your biofiltration needs, especially with a sponge, but mechanical may be lacking a bit and thus be sure to vacuum carefully whe changing the water.

The 600F here is my recommendation. If you use the oolitic sand in it you get additional buffering capacity, too :)

http://www.americanaquariumproducts.com/FluidizedSandFilter.html#600

Edited by Arctic Mama
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  • Regular Member

I actually have used this on my tanks in the past internally on my powerheads. Claimed to have about 400x surface area for the same amount of volume as k1 media... for my new setup I've been going entirely external with my equipment so I'm planning to build an external fluidized sand filter and splitting it with a flow valve off my main canisters return. With a tank your size they would recommend about 4L of k1 media so if this allegedly holds 400x the surface area like they say for the same volume of media... it shouldn't take much to become overkill, that's hardly a bad thing at all.

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Thanks again, this is where my ignorance of this sort of filter will really show but here goes:

 

1: is the #600 an internal filter?

2: the filter does not have its own motor; I will need a power-head to make it work?

3: if the filter is not powered I will not have a problem ordering the filter on line from America because not having a power supply of its own I won't need an adapter for Australian power outlets?

4: if point 3 is correct, I can then buy a local power-head that will work off Australian standard power outlets?

 

Sorry if I my continued questions are becoming annoying, I am still forming a picture of how this type of filter works  :(

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  • Regular Member

an easy diy internal sand filter...

this is more along the lines of the setup I'll be building my external sand filter on, except without the sponge inserts and mesh...

If you're not confident about your leakproofing ability and don't want one taking up space internally, go with the manufactured one... if you are slightly handy and want it faster, and at less than 1/4 cost this option will function just as effectively. Hope it helps.

Edited by rhanrahan
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  • Regular Member

Just a note if you were to do an external diy version based on that, just a straight pvc centre pipe like the first video has inside would be used, the joints are only to lock the sponges in place which won't be there in this case, so they're just extra steps and cost you wouldn't need for a sand filter variation. Keep in mind if you're confident in your ability this is a good option, but if not, don't risk ending up with water damage and a drained tank for the 60-70 extra dollars sake. :)

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Thank you both for all your patience, advice and help. I get it now, I will look around for a commercial internal filter and if I cannot get one here in Australia or on the internet I will have a go at making one myself. I like the idea of using a glass spaghetti container. It will look better than a plastic bottle. I was wondering what K1 was until I saw the video and now I get what rahnrahan meant when comparing K1 with sand.

 

Thanks again, I will let you know how I get on with this new project  :)

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Oh, my bad on the explaining part, for those who scratched their head about what the heck K1 kaldnes is, it's just another media used for moving bed filters, originally developed for use as a maintenance free media in a sewage treatment facility, so this is designed to work effectively on an extremely large scale, hence popularity on ponds and mega sized aquariums. Much the same as any fluidized bed filter it's constantly churning, needs essentially no maintenance. Very effective filtration, but the media itself isn't all that cheap or quite as effective per volume as sand, and if being used internally, which many hobbiests end up building some kinda air driven bottle design, which are quite efficient and effective, I think they tend to be a little more unsightly. Once the nice clean white plastic media matures it turns to a somewhat unsightly brownish tone as if using a pop bottle in the aquarium wasn't distracting enough on its own, but that's just my opinion, others may not care how it looks internally as long as it performs great.

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  • Helper

I am almost positive that AAP, the site I linked, will ship those to you. They do ship internationally for all that is legal to do so :).

Edited by Arctic Mama
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Fantastic, thanks Arctic Mama. I know internal filters can be unsightly but I can rearrange my plants and drift wood to hide even a moderately large filter. If the tank wasn't in the dining room or the cabinet an antique I would look at external systems. But I just find the tubes unsightly. I even find the power cords annoying.  :D

 

B5282DAE-CE51-4933-AC08-F0E0D3A2EC2F_zps

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  • Helper

I hide all my tubes and such with taller plants like amazon swords or valisnera. Works great. Plumbing the tank so only the black bulkhead shows is another option, which is what my newest setup has going. Nothing on the inside but a sponge over the outflow, and the sponge will be hidden by driftwood and plants.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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  • Regular Member

Hi Again,

I went to my favourite aquarium shop today and had a look at the Fluidised Sand Filters they have for sale. While there the owner of the shop suggested I take a look at a new filter technology. I have never heard of this sort of filtration before so I wondered if you would please give me your thoughts? The filter destroys ammonia which stops the nitrogen cycle in its tracks. This link is to the model I was shown today:

 

http://www.thetechden.com.au/OF_Hydra_40_Internal_Aquarium_Filter_p/qhu26.htm

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I finally found a review.  http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/content.php?sid=5376

 

This filter has been available for at least three years, but apparently hasn't made it to the US.  I can't find much useful information on it.

 

It has a very low flow rate.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • Regular Member

It is very new technology, I am still considering it as an option but have now thoroughly confused myself as to which filter is the best option for my particular situation. Maybe I should just accept the two hoses of the external power filter and go that way. I have been thinking about getting a carpenter to neatly cut an opening in the back of the sideboard the tank is sitting on and running the hoses up the back in one of the corners. Then rearranging the plants and driftwood to hide the pipes as has been suggested here. I am in the thinking stage still  :blink:

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