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kiro

Should I make sump, or go with two canisters?

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Hello everyone,

 

I'm looking for opinions and advice according the filtration of my future tank.

It will most likely be 150cm X 50cm X 50cm (375 liter/roughly 99 USG) sized, though I might go with bit bigger, 150cm X 60cm X 50cm (450 liter/roughly 118,9 USG), once I actually see the house we are going to move and can measure the places and see what we can fit through the doors.

 

When I first started to seriously researching what I would need for the tank I'd like, I couldn't find any filters that could reach the 10x GPH of the size of the tank I want (I know people in koko's like to recommend 10x for HOBs and 5-7x for canisters but I'm going by 10x rule for canisters as well since that's what they taught me here in Finland to do), so I turned my research towards sumps at suggestion of one other online hobbyist I sometimes chat with.

However, after browsing through koko's I actually managed to find brand of canisters that could easily handle 10x GPH for either size of the tanks I might end up with.

 

Now I am torn, if I should abandon the sump plan and just go with canisters, or if the pros of having sump (more water volume, more room for filter media etc.) would outrun the "ease" of just getting two canisters.

 

I would appreciate any and all suggestions and opinions. :)

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The problem with sumps that are not level with the main tank is that they aren inherently instable in terms of water volume, and there is always a risk of overflow, even with pumps and valves to control them. A sump level with the tank, like an overflow or even a second tank hiding behind the main, work quite well. But the advantages of sumps are fairly minimal compared to many other types of filtration. I'm not a huge canister lover, but if you are fastidious on maintenance they function very nicely, they can just be a bit of a pain to clean, depending on the model.

Edited by Arctic Mama

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Oh? I was under the impression that canisters were the most powerful and easy filters as far as commercial filtration goes.

Out of curiosity, what is the type of filter you would suggest? HOB? Would there be HOBs powerful enough to have GpH 10x 99 or 118 gallons?

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I do like canisters, but fluidized sand bed and sponge filters have better biological filtrati ons capacity with much, much less maintenance (FSB) and easier maintenance (sponges). Canisters can be tough to maintain and that leads people to be lazy with them and diminishes their functionality because of the higher bio load from the dirty pads or clogged up bio balls.

If they are maintained correctly canisters provide a nice balance of mechanical and biological filtration and allow chemical filtration if it is needed (most healthy aquariums don't need it). But a sponge intake on a fluidized sand bed OR a pond filter is my preference, because for goldfish higher biological filtration is really crucial. Mechanical waste removal is easily accomplished with a squeezing out the sponge and syphoning near the substrate during water changes. Canister filters are essentially a more expensive solution than several others available.

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Edited by Arctic Mama

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Thank you very much for the video and explanation Arctic Mama! I'll take a look at this properly when I get back to computer.

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I use 2 Fluval 406 and they are awesome. You can add as much filtration and all that other stuff you want but the bottom line is if your filters can keep ammonia and nitrite at 0, your filtration is sufficient.

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I just bought a marineland canister filter, and it seems to work just fine, and is very quiet.  It has little baskets in the bottom that contain the different types of filter media and seems like it works pretty well so far, and it was fairly easy to set up.  The only problem with it is that there's no shut off valve and it creates a siphon if you don't pull the intake tube out first.  Other than that, I haven't had it long enough to tell.  :idont

 

Years and years ago I had a HOB canister filter, but a regular HOB is likely better, because that thing was a PITA to take apart and clean and refill (I don't remember what company it came from anymore though).  A regular HOB filter (kind of like the Penguin biowheel filter I have), is likely the easiest to clean, won't create a siphon, but from what I've heard doesn't clean as much per gallon as a canister does, and you may want multiple for that large of a tank to make sure you're getting enough filtration per gallon.

 

I don't know a whole lot about sump filters as I've never had one.  I have done a little bit of youtubing on them, and I think the only way to make sure they don't overflow is to make sure your overflow/ intake only reaches so far into the tank so that it can only take in so many gallons (ideally less than what the sump tank is).  I think there's an equation for that, but I'm not sure what it is (I grew up hating math and out of spite never memorized equations) lol.  Sorry I can't help more, but that's just my :twocents  

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Thank you DieselPlower and LittleShadow for your opinions. I really appreciate all the input.

So I've been doing some more asking around and research, and it seems most people suggest that unless I'm 100% sure I can calculate the water volume right so that the leakage isn't a danger.

Canisters should work fine as long as I keep up with the maintenance (about once a month I believe?)

I actually have another question regarding the canister and UV sterilizers: Does anyone know if it matters if the UV is built in the canister, or as separate? And should the UV connect to the in or output of the waterflow (I.e before or after canister. I'm guessing after?).

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Or you could make a pond filter :)

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I'm sorry Koko, what is pond filter? Google gives me different results so I am confused?

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Thank you very much Koko! :) 

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Thank you DieselPlower and LittleShadow for your opinions. I really appreciate all the input.

So I've been doing some more asking around and research, and it seems most people suggest that unless I'm 100% sure I can calculate the water volume right so that the leakage isn't a danger.

Canisters should work fine as long as I keep up with the maintenance (about once a month I believe?)

I actually have another question regarding the canister and UV sterilizers: Does anyone know if it matters if the UV is built in the canister, or as separate? And should the UV connect to the in or output of the waterflow (I.e before or after canister. I'm guessing after?).

You need a separate one to get actual UV sterilization, as it needs to have a long enough dwell time to work. Some are definitrly better than others.

Browse through here to get more detailed opinions:

http://www.uvsterilizerreview.com

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Thank you so much again ArcticMama! You are real treasure :heart

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