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Kordon Breathing Bags


Kate89

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I've just accepted a job offer (yay!) in a town about an hour out of London, so we will be moving out there in the next 8 weeks.

 

Having never moved house with fish before, I was wondering what the best way of transporting them would be. It's only an hour drive, but add on any faffing at either end and realistically we're looking at the fish being out of their tank for 2-3 hours. Are Kordon Breathing Bags the best option on the market? Would it be best to transport them in these bags in a polystyrene box with a lid (which is how I collected several of my fish)?

 

Advice from anyone who has experienced moving with fish would be most welcome :)

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Congratulations on the new job!

 

I have no experience moving with fish, but I have my fingers crossed everything will go smoothly for you.

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An hour is a rather short journey. Bags are probably the most hassle free in terms of set and forget, but you could also put them in a bucket of water and baby them in the car. The sloshing should keep the water aerated. :)

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An hour is a rather short journey. Bags are probably the most hassle free in terms of set and forget, but you could also put them in a bucket of water and baby them in the car. The sloshing should keep the water aerated. :)

 

Dan I don't like the sound of sloshing! Sounds like a recipe for disaster! (Well with baz's driving anyway... :lol)

Maybe bags would be best, I'm just finding the Kordon bags difficult to get hold of in the UK? And also what's the deal with bag size, is bigger better? 

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I've moved my fish twice, each time it was a 6 hour drive plus about 1-2 hours of tank disassembly/assembly, so 2 hours should really not be a big deal.

 

As far as the fish goes, the major factors are temperature and oxygen. I'd fast your fish for 48 hrs in advance just in case so that his/her water stays nice and clean in transit. If you're really worried the fish won't do well in transit, you can also lower the temperature in the tank gradually a couple days beforehand since fish are less active in cooler temperatures (but this is probably not necessary for such a short trip).  

 

The first time I moved, I used a medium size trash bag, filled it with a couple inches of clean water from the top of his aquarium, added prime, then used an air blower to fill the bag with air, twisted and rubber banned it and stuck it in a cooler (this is important if it's really hot or really cold when you're moving--you don't want the temperature to change more than a couple degrees). 

 

The second time my fish was a lot bigger and I was worried about oxygen (probably unnecessarily), so I lined the cooler with a trash bag, filled it partially with primed clean water from the top of the aquarium, and stuck in a battery operated bubbler. Both times I closed the lid on the cooler to keep it dark and ensure a relatively consistent temperature. When you place the cooler in the car, also make sure that it's stable and won't move around--I placed mine on the floor in the backseat wedged against the seats.

 

When you get to your destination, it's a good idea to continue to keep it dark so your fish stays calm and adjust the fish gradually to the aquarium just like you would a new fish, matching water temp etc.

 

I think the much trickier part about moving for me was preserving the filter media--the good bacteria will die after a few hours without oxygen, so I stuck them in a covered bucket with a battery operated bubbler as well and when I re setup my aquarium the cycle didn't reset. Since your move won't take as long though, it might be sufficient to just keep the filter media wet in a bucket.

 

I hope that helps and good luck with your move!

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Thanks for your advice everyone :)

 

I'm going to order the bags, they seem like the best option. 

With regards to my cycle, I have a canister filter so was going to transport that still full of water, so the media stays wet, and was going to transport the tank with about an inch of water in it to keep the sand wet, so hopefully I shouldn't get a cycle bump. 

 

I'll let you know how it goes nearer the time, and if anyone has anymore advice keep it coming!

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I move four times a year with my fish. This year each trip was 5 hours one way. Each time, I had four fish (more large fish than small) in a five gallon bucket that was double-primed, with a lid. They rode in the trailer towed by my grandparents' truck, or in the cab if it was too cold. The all did fine.

Edited by ChelseaM
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Just an hour's trip?  Lots of us take more time than that to bring a newly purchased fish home from the store.  

 

As long as they are in a bag that won't spill you should be fine. 

 

Just to clarify, nitrifiers do not die without oxygen, they just stop nitrifying until they have the O2 needed to continue their work.  I'd just put the medium in the fish bags.

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The breathing bags are awfully expensive, I'd skip them and just use a normal ziploc ir a bucket. It's a really short trip. Those are generally only recommended for 2-4 days in transit, from all I have read.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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I forgot to add: As far as the canister goes, you could just bag up the media with half water, half air as well. This cuts down on the weight of the whole thing, and also reduces the incidence of spilling that comes with trying to transport a full canister.

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I want to second or third or fourth the transporting in buckets method, especially if you're only moving an hour. I'd be more worried about keeping the filters damp and some water over the sandy substrate to try to maintain good bacteria. I would wrap the aquarium in blankets and put the filters in another bucket (without impellers, obviously). You should try to move all fish equipment in your car and handle it yourself (especially the fish) or monitor your movers VERY carefully. At least here in NYC the movers can be pretty indifferent and be of the "why bother with fish" mentality. Actually, I recommend contacting the movers beforehand and explaining your tank situation and how, if there is damage, there will be hell to pay (in a nicer way than that, of course).

 

I've moved my fish three times now and they have survived each time, once it took three hours since the U-Haul got caught in traffic and I beat the truck. The other two times took 3 or even 4 hours due to various moving-related messes. I also always moved in the summer. Keeping the fish cooler is better, too, and doing a partial bucket water change as soon as you get to your new destination. Then fill the tanks and the filters to get the party started.  

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I thought everyone from the US would be like 'an hour?! What's this British girl worrying about?!' :rofl

I might just go with the regular bags rather than the Kordon ones then, they are expensive and don't seem to be readily available in the UK. Or I might just put them in buckets - but I'm worried about sloshing and spillage, London roads aren't that smooth or free-flowing!

Great tips on the filter media, will probably just take the media out of the trays and put it at the bottom of the canister and cover with water, rather than travelling with the canister full to the top.

Thanks again for all your advice guys :)

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I want to second or third or fourth the transporting in buckets method, especially if you're only moving an hour. I'd be more worried about keeping the filters damp and some water over the sandy substrate to try to maintain good bacteria. I would wrap the aquarium in blankets and put the filters in another bucket (without impellers, obviously). You should try to move all fish equipment in your car and handle it yourself (especially the fish) or monitor your movers VERY carefully. At least here in NYC the movers can be pretty indifferent and be of the "why bother with fish" mentality. Actually, I recommend contacting the movers beforehand and explaining your tank situation and how, if there is damage, there will be hell to pay (in a nicer way than that, of course).

 

I've moved my fish three times now and they have survived each time, once it took three hours since the U-Haul got caught in traffic and I beat the truck. The other two times took 3 or even 4 hours due to various moving-related messes. I also always moved in the summer. Keeping the fish cooler is better, too, and doing a partial bucket water change as soon as you get to your new destination. Then fill the tanks and the filters to get the party started.

Don't worry, we will be doing all the moving ourselves (no such luxury of movers!), so we'll only have ourselves to blame if something goes wrong!

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