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Pothos that's been treated with insecticide?


cmclien

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I was at Home Depot to pick up a pothos and noticed it said its been treated to prevent insects with insecticide. Of course I don't want that in my tank.

Is it safe to get it if I rinse it well? I don't want to hurt my fish even though it will be mostly the roots that are in.

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I wouldn't do. Insecticides are very toxic to fish.

I've heard warnings to pond owners not to forget that they've sprayed their arms with mosquito repellent. Putting their DEET sprayed arms in the pond can kill the fish.

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All that will be in the water is the roots.  I agree with DP completely.  

 

I do know quite a few pond owners, and I've never heard of one washing of the bug repellent before working in the pond.  (This info sheet on DEET indicates it kills fish only at very high levels.)  Nor have I heard of any problems with dogs that have been treated for fleas playing/swimming in the pond, or with aerial spraying for mosquitoes.  We have a lot of bugs in FL, and use a lot of repellents and insecticides, and pond fish still thrive.  

 

A lot of people on this forum feed greens to their goldfish that are not certified organic.  These have been treated with insecticides, and the fish survive.

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Not knowing what to do at the time, I went to another store and they didn't have pothos but they did have a philodendron vine so I got that and divided it into two.  I hope the philodendron doesn't need too much light.  They also had the curly bamboo, nice and tall stalks so I got four of those.

 

The reason I'm doing this is I have noticed recently that my 10g riparium style betta tank has virtually no algae or diatoms in it yet its in a very bright sunny room.  I've been trying to read through Walstads book and she mentioned aerial plants being the key to ultimately combating most algae, based on my 10g I would agree with this so I decided I needed to get some rooted aerial plants in my 35 so this is where I am starting.

 

My 10g has two peace lillies in it (spathphyllum) hope I spelled that right and two dwarf cyperus umbrella sedge plants and a pennywort floating on the top.  The growth is really going fast especially on the umbrellas so I'm wondering if that really is the key to once and for all getting "most" of my algae to go away especially the diatoms.

Edited by CindiL
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Not knowing what to do at the time, I went to another store and they didn't have pothos but they did have a philodendron vine so I got that and divided it into two.  I hope the philodendron doesn't need too much light.  They also had the curly bamboo, nice and tall stalks so I got four of those.

 

The reason I'm doing this is I have noticed recently that my 10g riparium style betta tank has virtually no algae or diatoms in it yet its in a very bright sunny room.  I've been trying to read through Walstads book and she mentioned aerial plants being the key to ultimately combating most algae, based on my 10g I would agree with this so I decided I needed to get some rooted aerial plants in my 35 so this is where I am starting.

 

My 10g has two peace lillies in it (spathphyllum) hope I spelled that right and two dwarf cyperus umbrella sedge plants and a pennywort floating on the top.  The growth is really going fast especially on the umbrellas so I'm wondering if that really is the key to once and for all getting "most" of my algae to go away especially the diatoms.

This is interesting what you said, Cindi.  Hmmmm.........  I would love to see no algae and/or diatoms in my tanks.  You'll have to post photo's of your tank once all done with your new plants.

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She sites all of these studies in ponds, lakes supporting the idea.  Her book is very hard to understand unless you're a biology major/teacher like Shakaho (isn't that what you taught)? but there are some good points I'm picking up including this one.  It has something to do with iron and carbon and I won't even attempt to expain it ha ha.  I'd have to read it again.  I know that aerial plants can pick up lots of carbon from the air and will grow and utilize whats available in the water by doing this.  I've been having to drop in cucumber slices for my nerite since there isn't much of anything for him to eat.

 

On my 35g a lot of my new plants are getting diatoms/algae on them which is disheartening to see.  I try and take a toothbrush here and there and clean them off the best I can but because they're planted its awkward to do.   I really am hoping this will be what I need.  It will be nice to have the philodendron grow over the side of the tank.  I was just reading you can swap over the following house plants to live with their roots in water:

  • Begonias
  • Chinese evergreen
  • Coleus
  • Croton
  • Dracena
  • Herbs, including mint, basil, oregano, lavender, rosemary, and sage
  • Impatiens
  • Ivy (any type)
  • Philodendron
  • Pothos
  • Sweet potato vine
  • Wandering Jew

 

I love coleus and the smaller variety of dracaenas with the multi-colored leaves.  I wish I would've know that before I went out today.  Might go back out tomorrow ;)

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Also wanted to mention Cheryl that my glass/ghost shrimp have become some of my favorite inhabitants in my tanks.  Weren't we talking about that at some point?

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Also wanted to mention Cheryl that my glass/ghost shrimp have become some of my favorite inhabitants in my tanks.  Weren't we talking about that at some point?

Yes, I think we were talking about shrimp, cherry shrimp for myself.  I never did get any though.  I think my tropical tank might be fully stocked now especially once I get a couple more Oto's to the three I have now.   One of these years though on the Red Cherry Shrimp. :)  Are your shrimp fun to watch?

 

 I still haven't posted a more current set up of my tank.  I've had some algae problems also.  I've been keeping up on that mess when I thought I had some of that nasty bearded algae.  It was on the outside of some of my leaves.  I didn't even bother with that mess for too long.  I was doing more frequent w/c and it seemed to help a tiny bit.  Overall, I ended up cutting those leaves off.  To me, it looked like a lot but I couldn't tell by just looking at my tank with plants because I have so many plants in my tank.  So that was a good thing. haha  It did clean up the appearance a lot by my "pruning."  I have liquid flourish, iron, and excel but I still need to do a lot of reading on all of those because I don't really know what I'm doing so I just add the excel every couple of days like when I had my planted betta tank last year.  

 

I'll have to re-read your two big posts above again.  Thanks for all the information Cindi. :)

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I had bought three cherry shrimp but I'm sorry to say that my betta must have ate them as they are gone and I have seen no bodies :(

 

So then I bought 2 glass shrimp which are big enough he leaves them alone even when they crawl right next to him.  He went after them at first but they turn around and defend themselves.  I also have 5 in my big tank now.  They clean up every spec of food on the substrate, food that I think even the cories would miss.  I really enjoy watching them, probably as much as my fish.  They're not as shy as the cherries are out anytime there is food.

Edited by CindiL
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All that will be in the water is the roots. I agree with DP completely.

I do know quite a few pond owners, and I've never heard of one washing of the bug repellent before working in the pond. (This info sheet on DEET indicates it kills fish only at very high levels.) Nor have I heard of any problems with dogs that have been treated for fleas playing/swimming in the pond, or with aerial spraying for mosquitoes. We have a lot of bugs in FL, and use a lot of repellents and insecticides, and pond fish still thrive.

A lot of people on this forum feed greens to their goldfish that are not certified organic. These have been treated with insecticides, and the fish survive.

Your comment got me thinking ... it's entirely possible that most of what's available HAS been treated with pesticides, and this particular store just happened to disclose that. Here in California anyway, when you go to the grocery store to buy fruits and veggies, you can pretty much assume something has been treated with pesticides if it's not labeled "certified organic" (and even then, there are treatments organic farmers are allowed to use that are controversial to some).
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