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Saralyn

Keeping fancies in a pond during winter in Kentucky?

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Sorry - I know I keep popping in and out on here all the time. I've also made multiple post about wanting to get a pond together. Well for once we actually have the money and a legit plan for the pond. Originally, I was just going to get a 300 gallon, but now my Dad is going to build me one that's going to range from 1,400 gallons to 1,900 gallons.(8ft x 8ft x 4ft deep or 3ft deep). The pond will be above ground because I don't want to damage his land I will need to move it in the future. We're suppose to start next week.

 

One of my concerns is about my fancies making it through Kentucky's winters. I know I've heard some people say it's not as harsh as other states. Only a handful of days does it ever go below 0. I've asked this question in different places and gotten different answers. I've been told that it wasn't possible to keep fancies outside. If that's the case I'm at a stand still because I can't have tanks in my Dad's house (I just moved back in). I've went back and read my old post but still feel scared about this.

 

My current goldfish breeds are: Black Moors, a Shubunkin, Comets, a Common, Calico Telescopes, Fantails (the majority), and Orandas.

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Wow a huge pond! You're very fortunate that your dad is going to build one for you!

 

You can buy a heater and keep the pond water temperature above freezing in the winter. You can keep an outside pond at any temperature, just like a hot tub if you don't mind paying for it.  

 

But it is the predators you'll have to worry about. I have all single tails and one koi. I used to have a fantail. The bird ate my fantail,  and they're considered the most "pond suitable" of the fancies.  They can't avoid natural dangers as quickly.  

 

If you're up to putting a net over the pond and providing secure places to hide...maybe....at your own risk and theirs.

Many people that do ponds don't care about the individual fish, they treat them like a lot of people treat plants: Ah well. It died. Get another.  

 

Even people who know ALL ABOUT the risks still lose pond fish to raccoons, kingfishers and herons. Nature is red in tooth and claw. 

 

I'm not saying not to do it, or that it isn't possible - just inform yourself like you are doing  :clapping:  know the various risks and take precautions.

Edited by mysterygirl

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I don't mind to pay for a heater. I just want to make sure my fish are safe. The pond is for the fish to have a better life.  :D We plan on having a nice defensive cover for the pond too.

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Are you having a professional build (or at least design) this pond?  The walls of a 3-4 ft deep above ground pond would have to be very strong.  I can't imagine any home-built  pond strong enough to hold that much water above ground that would also be movable.  Please show us your plans.  Also include your plans for filtration.

 

alternatively, you could get a 8 or 9 foot diameter stock tank and your dad could build an insulated surround for it.  Or you could get an above-ground swimming pool and do the same thing.  

 

Many people in climates like yours build a greenhouse-type structure to cover the pond in the winter.   The same "roof" frame can support shade cloth in the summer and plastic in the winter. This can keep the water free of ice and often quite warm.  Heating a pond of the size you are considering  would be prohibitively expensive.  Heaters can be used to keep a hole in the ice, but not to significantly raise the water temperature of a >1000 gallon pond.  

 

There are people who keep fancy goldfish in ponds under ice.  Personally, I would have no problems with keeping fancies in a pond in KY year around.  However I can't recommend it to a beginning ponder (unless you use the "greenhouse" approach).  The main cause of fish deaths in the winter is actually not sensitivity to temperature, but problems with water quality.  

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It's great to have a large pond, but in practical terms - how are you going to see the fish?  Will there be a deck around the pond?  Like Sharon mentioned, its hard for me to imagine a freestanding pond with those dimensions that was not an above-ground swimming pool.  

 

I'll admit, I'm a bit driven by aesthetics.  Have you seen DieselPlowers pond?  That is an attractive in-ground pond in Michigan.  It can't be moved, but could be filled in when no longer wanted.

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