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Comet fin question


MT28

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So maybe this is a dumb question but I haven't been able to find it in a thread. Why do some comets have neatly rounded fins and tails  while others have very long streaming fins and tails? Is it completely about the genetics of the individual fish or are there actually different kinds of comets? Are better bred more expensive comets likely to have longer more flowy fins as opposed to feeder comets who have been interbred with commons? I did notice that stunted comets and very old comets seem to be more likely to have the long, flowy fins, so is it more a matter of age? Do all comets evetually develop long flowy fins?

 

I've attached two pictures randomly pulled off the internet to illustrate my point.

Comet05.jpg99b8b10897ac0d41a14d94def6c2ddb1.jpg

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There are commons and Comets. Comets have the longer flowy fins. So yes, it does involve genetics.

 

I understand the difference between commons (short caudal fin) and comets (long, deeply forked caudal fin) but was wondering about the variations in comet caudal fins. 

Hidr: If it's a matter of genetics, are more expensive comet goldfish (as opposed to feeders) bred for the long flowy fin trait or is it kind of random? I ask, because I'd love to get a comet with pretty flowing fins to keep my existing comet company!

 

Thanks!

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There is a gene that distinguishes the short tail with rounded lobes of the hibuna from the forked, longer tail of the comet.  In addition, there are many genes that collectively affect the length of the fins.  Often this is a secondary effect of those genes.  These genes function "additively" much like the genes that determine human height.  Genes with additive effects make selective breeding effective.  If you pick the comets with the longest fins in each generation for breeding, you can establish a strain of  comets with very long fins.  This can backfire if the fins get so long and heavy the the fish is dragging a drooping tail behind it.

 

Fins do keep growing with age, so if the fish in the first picture were a year old, it might in another few years have a tail nearly as long as its body, but it will never look like the fish in the second picture. 

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Wow, what a  gorgeous comet! Can't wait to see how my fish will change and grow over the next few years!

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