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Aeration requiremenst for goldfish


Ree

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Hi,

 

My 131mm round disc air stone in my 100L tank broke today.  It got me thinking, how much aeration do I need for my tank?

 

The temp range on the new heater I purchased is from 18-30 degrees Celsius (it gets down to 2 degrees Celsius inside in the winter).  My little 20L tank used to get to 27/28 degrees Celsius in the summer, but haven't had this 100L tank very long so I'm hoping the larger volume of water will keep the tank a little cooler, and ill add cooler water for them if the heat is an issue (we don't have air conditioners, and it can get up to 35 degrees Celsius in the house on the hottest days).

 

I have this air pump

http://www.aquaticsupplies.com.au/eheim-adjustable-air-pump-3704-with-hose-and-diffuser-2-x-200l-h.html

 

and am running the two air stones that came with it now, but am more than willing to add more if needed...  but that's just it, I don't know what's needed!

 

Can you please offer advice? 

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Im not really sure on how much is needed, I only have two smallish airstones in mine but a large pump running them. I also try to add more surface agitation with my filters to provide oxygen that way too.

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Im not really sure on how much is needed, I only have two smallish airstones in mine but a large pump running them. I also try to add more surface agitation with my filters to provide oxygen that way too.

 

Thanks Mandy,  :D

 

I had forgotten about the filter!  :doh11:  I have a little surface agitation from the overhead sump filter, but not a lot.  I was just concerned in the summer there would be a greater need for aeration for my tank.

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If there isn't much surface agitation, I'd add aeration. An air stone also provides circulation in the tank, which helps to oxygenate the whole tank.

 

Thanks Chelsea :D,

 

I have two airstones running on one air socket.  The air socket is 200L/hour.. 

 

I maybe need to try to quantify the surface agitation....  I would say maybe 2/9ths of the water surface is agitated?  Just a guess.

 

Or should the answer be in watching the fish?  I just didn't want it to get stressful for them before I realised they needed more air! 

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Are the ripples going clear across the tank?

 

They go all the way across on the shortest length, and at least 2/3 the way across on the longest length.

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Are the ripples going clear across the tank?

 

They go all the way across on the shortest length, and at least 2/3 the way across on the longest length.

 

What sort of outflow does the sump have? Does that generate any surface agitation?

 

If so, if you put the airstones on the opposite end of the tank to the sump outflow, then you can have agitation across the entire surface.

 

Or just put one stone at one end and one at the other. :)

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Are the ripples going clear across the tank?

 

They go all the way across on the shortest length, and at least 2/3 the way across on the longest length.

 

What sort of outflow does the sump have? Does that generate any surface agitation?

 

If so, if you put the airstones on the opposite end of the tank to the sump outflow, then you can have agitation across the entire surface.

 

Or just put one stone at one end and one at the other. :)

 

 

So as long as the entire surface is agitated, that's all they will need?  Even when the tank temperature rises? 

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Are the ripples going clear across the tank?

 

They go all the way across on the shortest length, and at least 2/3 the way across on the longest length.

 

What sort of outflow does the sump have? Does that generate any surface agitation?

 

If so, if you put the airstones on the opposite end of the tank to the sump outflow, then you can have agitation across the entire surface.

 

Or just put one stone at one end and one at the other. :)

 

 

So as long as the entire surface is agitated, that's all they will need?  Even when the tank temperature rises? 

 

If the tank starts to go above 26C, then you'll either want to run a fan across the surface, or add another stone or two to cool things off, but I think that until then, provided there are no other problems due to the overstocking, you should be okay.

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Are the ripples going clear across the tank?

 

They go all the way across on the shortest length, and at least 2/3 the way across on the longest length.

 

What sort of outflow does the sump have? Does that generate any surface agitation?

 

If so, if you put the airstones on the opposite end of the tank to the sump outflow, then you can have agitation across the entire surface.

 

Or just put one stone at one end and one at the other. :)

 

 

So as long as the entire surface is agitated, that's all they will need?  Even when the tank temperature rises? 

 

If the tank starts to go above 26C, then you'll either want to run a fan across the surface, or add another stone or two to cool things off, but I think that until then, provided there are no other problems due to the overstocking, you should be okay.

 

 

Ok, Thankyou so much for that Chelsea.  I think I am having a bad OCD day! 

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I don't use airstones because I can't stand the noise of the air pump.

 

Here's a good article on aeration,

 

Hi Sharon,  Thanks so much for that.  It is a good article.  I think I might need to re-read it to get it into my head! 

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Ree ....... its Australia seriously don't be worried about your tank temps going above 26 degrees, 26 degree in summer for your tank would be on the cool side.

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Ree ....... its Australia seriously don't be worried about your tank temps going above 26 degrees, 26 degree in summer for your tank would be on the cool side.

 

Thanks Jim,  what temp is it safe for goldfish to get up to?  Just so I know not to worry.  Thanks so much for your input.

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Ree ....... its Australia seriously don't be worried about your tank temps going above 26 degrees, 26 degree in summer for your tank would be on the cool side.

 

Thanks Jim,  what temp is it safe for goldfish to get up to?  Just so I know not to worry.  Thanks so much for your input.

 

 

 

Well it's Australia!

 

As you said in your original post your temps inside your house can get up to 35 degrees, what about when we have a couple of days 43+ or 45+ ? My pond handles that and it may get up to the mid 30's.

 

I know lots of people from the northern hemisphere may disagree with these temps, but these are the temps our goldfish regularly live through, thrive and breed here in hot Australia.

 

Ever been to Thailand, Singapore or Vietnam? When you leave the airport you literally get bowled over by the heat. Sometimes of the year Hong Kong isn't much better. Yet we all know that goldfish and koi do very well in the hot climes of these countries. Besides the around 30% of goldfish that are bred locally in Australia the other 70% or so are imported from Asia.

 

The goldfish we keep, are much more used to warmer temps than being in a pond with ice over the top :)

 

I have a friend in Cairns (Queensland, Australia) and he has two ponds and has breeding Discus in one and goldfish in another. He's happy if the water stays at 32 degrees :)

 

The ocean currents have been around 26 - 28 degrees for the last month off the coast of New South Wales and Queensland as it always is at this time of the year at the end of summer.

 

Honestly Ree don't stress about the water temps of your tank.

 

(Maybe get an A/C for your own comfort though!)

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My tank has got to 30 in summer before :o Normally stays around 28 though. But it warms up with waterchanges in Summer because the water coming out my COLD tap is often around 32 :o

 

Mandy 32 degrees out of the tap, that's great for an outside shower :)

 

We're just a little luckier than that, our water has to travel 60 kilometres underground before it comes to us and that keeps it around 26 - 28 in summer.

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Ree ....... its Australia seriously don't be worried about your tank temps going above 26 degrees, 26 degree in summer for your tank would be on the cool side.

 

Thanks Jim,  what temp is it safe for goldfish to get up to?  Just so I know not to worry.  Thanks so much for your input.

 

 

 

Well it's Australia!

 

As you said in your original post your temps inside your house can get up to 35 degrees, what about when we have a couple of days 43+ or 45+ ? My pond handles that and it may get up to the mid 30's.

 

I know lots of people from the northern hemisphere may disagree with these temps, but these are the temps our goldfish regularly live through, thrive and breed here in hot Australia.

 

Ever been to Thailand, Singapore or Vietnam? When you leave the airport you literally get bowled over by the heat. Sometimes of the year Hong Kong isn't much better. Yet we all know that goldfish and koi do very well in the hot climes of these countries. Besides the around 30% of goldfish that are bred locally in Australia the other 70% or so are imported from Asia.

 

The goldfish we keep, are much more used to warmer temps than being in a pond with ice over the top :)

 

I have a friend in Cairns (Queensland, Australia) and he has two ponds and has breeding Discus in one and goldfish in another. He's happy if the water stays at 32 degrees :)

 

The ocean currents have been around 26 - 28 degrees for the last month off the coast of New South Wales and Queensland as it always is at this time of the year at the end of summer.

 

Honestly Ree don't stress about the water temps of your tank.

 

(Maybe get an A/C for your own comfort though!)

 

 

LOL I LOVE your explanation!  Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!! :clapping:

 

I wish for the A/C, so does my cat!  We are living in a rented bedsitter at the moment, and we are trying to madly save for a house deposit.  Because we are both on disability pensions, we cannot borrow more than about $100,000, so we have to really save (which means cost cutting everywhere).... I wont mind a two or three more years of heat if we can have our own home, not have to move, and have more room for a bigger fish tank!  :fishtank Or maybe two...  :happydance  

 

ill just have to do this :icecream to stay cooler! :lol:

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My tank has got to 30 in summer before :o Normally stays around 28 though. But it warms up with waterchanges in Summer because the water coming out my COLD tap is often around 32 :o

 

We have the same trouble here!  Our water pipes come from a house and between us and the house is an exposed sandy/rocky area with no grass and the pipes sit on top of this for a length of about 6m.  We get hot water out of our cold tap in the summer... I might have to put some of their water in the freezer to cool it down for a little while when I do water changes.

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one aspect of this conversation i didnt notice while skimming through is the relationship between the benificial bacteria and oxygen levels. as temperatures increase, the metabolism of the fish increases, and they produce more waste. through respiration and since they need more food in warmer water. This means to handle the additional waste load, the bacteria will need to multiply or work harder. these bacteria function best at high oxygen levels. So while it is wise of you to have considered the temperature and oxygen levels for the fish, it is also good to consider the entire ecosystem involved. Operating an air pump is cheap, so I'd say go for it.

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one aspect of this conversation i didnt notice while skimming through is the relationship between the benificial bacteria and oxygen levels. as temperatures increase, the metabolism of the fish increases, and they produce more waste. through respiration and since they need more food in warmer water. This means to handle the additional waste load, the bacteria will need to multiply or work harder. these bacteria function best at high oxygen levels. So while it is wise of you to have considered the temperature and oxygen levels for the fish, it is also good to consider the entire ecosystem involved. Operating an air pump is cheap, so I'd say go for it.

 

Hi DieselPower,

 

Thanks for the added information.  I will try to keep the water well oxygenated, esp when it starts to heat up again around here.  At the moment we are heading into our winter, so I wont have to stress about the water temps being too warm for a while. 

 

Thanks so much for your advice!

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