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Wesleyworking

Disgusting fish rescue!

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Hey all you kokonuts, I had a question for you guys. I may be rescuing three single tail goldfish next weekend and their tank is just vile..... https://vimeo.com/123695634

4b40877ed861e3f12fbd0a58f085923b.jpg they are living in what i believe is a 40 gallon long but I'm not 100% sure. They may be coming to live with me in a nice and clean 40 breeder, until I can see if a couple of my friends with fish ponds would be willing to take them off my hands. As you can see in the video, the fish have a filthy tank, half of it has about 3 inches of ..gunk.. Sitting in it. My question was, will there be any problems changing the fish from such a disgusting environment to a clean one? If there are, what are some ways I could make the change easier on them. Thanks guys!

Edited by Wesleyworking

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Check the ph make your ph equal to it and you can slowly chage it to your normal ph with small WCs

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OMG! :yikes  That is just horrible! :scared  I'm surprised that they are still alive in that crappy water :o

 

 I know the water parameters are most likely terrible in the tank they are in now! :no:

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OMG! :yikes That is just horrible! :scared I'm surprised that they are still alive in that crappy water :o

I know the water parameters are most likely terrible in the tank they are in now! :no:

yeah, I visited them about a month ago and there was an almost 8 inch pleco where that muck pile is... I think they will make it until the end of the week. I just really hope the water doesn't shock them to death

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OMG! :yikes That is just horrible! :scared I'm surprised that they are still alive in that crappy water :o

I know the water parameters are most likely terrible in the tank they are in now! :no:

yeah, I visited them about a month ago and there was an almost 8 inch pleco where that muck pile is... I think they will make it until the end of the week. I just really hope the water doesn't shock them to death

 

I never had to deal with such a situation like this so I don't know how they will react or what will happen. I wish you all the luck in the world that you can save these poor fish.

 

Are these fish of your friend or something?

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OMG! :yikes That is just horrible! :scared I'm surprised that they are still alive in that crappy water :o

I know the water parameters are most likely terrible in the tank they are in now! :no:

yeah, I visited them about a month ago and there was an almost 8 inch pleco where that muck pile is... I think they will make it until the end of the week. I just really hope the water doesn't shock them to death

I never had to deal with such a situation like this so I don't know how they will react or what will happen. I wish you all the luck in the world that you can save these poor fish.

Are these fish of your friend or something?

Thank you. There is this lady who owns a pottery place out in the country where we visit every time we go out to the country, and the lady has always had fish. She has had some MASSIVE orandas, but anyway she has gotten very old and I think she has kind of just forgotten about her fish...

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OMG! :yikes That is just horrible! :scared I'm surprised that they are still alive in that crappy water :o

I know the water parameters are most likely terrible in the tank they are in now! :no:

yeah, I visited them about a month ago and there was an almost 8 inch pleco where that muck pile is... I think they will make it until the end of the week. I just really hope the water doesn't shock them to death
I never had to deal with such a situation like this so I don't know how they will react or what will happen. I wish you all the luck in the world that you can save these poor fish.

Are these fish of your friend or something?

Thank you. There is this lady who owns a pottery place out in the country where we visit every time we go out to the country, and the lady has always had fish. She has had some MASSIVE orandas, but anyway she has gotten very old and I think she has kind of just forgotten about her fish...

 

Yeah that would explain it. Probably just too overwhelming for her now. Did you already ask her if you could have the fish?

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OMG! :yikes That is just horrible! :scared I'm surprised that they are still alive in that crappy water :o

I know the water parameters are most likely terrible in the tank they are in now! :no:

yeah, I visited them about a month ago and there was an almost 8 inch pleco where that muck pile is... I think they will make it until the end of the week. I just really hope the water doesn't shock them to death
I never had to deal with such a situation like this so I don't know how they will react or what will happen. I wish you all the luck in the world that you can save these poor fish.

Are these fish of your friend or something?

Thank you. There is this lady who owns a pottery place out in the country where we visit every time we go out to the country, and the lady has always had fish. She has had some MASSIVE orandas, but anyway she has gotten very old and I think she has kind of just forgotten about her fish...

Yeah that would explain it. Probably just too overwhelming for her now. Did you already ask her if you could have the fish?
I asked about taking her fish and her tanks but she didn't really seem to fond of that idea. She wants to sell them, and I think she has someone who may be taking them, but I think she will give me the fish. I still need to call her and ask about them.

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Yes, you do need to ease the fish into a new environment.  The fish have been living like this for a long time, so they don't find their home anywhere near as unpleasant as you do.  Old water is likely to be high in nitrate and low in pH.  At least part of the problem with rapidly dropping the nitrate concentration is probably pH shock.

 

Here's my recommendation:

 

Get a plastic tote to use in acclimating the fish to your water, since I'm sure you don't want to put that ugly water in your nice clean tank.  

 

When you get the fish, get a bucket of their tank water in addition to the water (from their tank) you are transporting them in.  

 

When you get home, put that water in the tote,  add a gallon of clean water and the fish.  Measure nitrate and pH.

 

Periodically, (I suggest not more than once every 2 hours or so, and I'm just guessing) add a gallon of fresh water to the tote.  

 

When the tote is full, do 10% water changes at a similar interval.

 

Test every other day or so.

 

When the nitrate is down to 40 ppm and the pH is close to that of your tap water,  move the fish into  all clean water in the 40B.

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Omg thats horrible, makes me feel sick looking at it :( Good Luck with them!

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Yes, you do need to ease the fish into a new environment. The fish have been living like this for a long time, so they don't find their home anywhere near as unpleasant as you do. Old water is likely to be high in nitrate and low in pH. At least part of the problem with rapidly dropping the nitrate concentration is probably pH shock.

Here's my recommendation:

Get a plastic tote to use in acclimating the fish to your water, since I'm sure you don't want to put that ugly water in your nice clean tank.

When you get the fish, get a bucket of their tank water in addition to the water (from their tank) you are transporting them in.

When you get home, put that water in the tote, add a gallon of clean water and the fish. Measure nitrate and pH.

Periodically, (I suggest not more than once every 2 hours or so, and I'm just guessing) add a gallon of fresh water to the tote.

When the tote is full, do 10% water changes at a similar interval.

Test every other day or so.

When the nitrate is down to 40 ppm and the pH is close to that of your tap water, move the fish into all clean water in the 40B.

Thank you, that was very helpful

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I actually have another question for you guys. You may be able to see in the beginning of the video that the largest fish actually has wen growth! Is there a specific name for a single tail with wen growth?

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I actually have another question for you guys. You may be able to see in the beginning of the video that the largest fish actually has wen growth! Is there a specific name for a single tail with wen growth?

I swear my shubunkin has slight wen growth but I have no clue what they are called if they have wen growth sorry :(

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Once you get the fish, show us some clearer pictures. :)

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Good luck with them! Good for you for rescuing them!

Edited by Mikey

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Good luck Wesley! :)

Edited by Lis.

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No, there's no name for it, but it's not unusual for older fish of "unwenned" varieties to develop small wens.  

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I actually have another question for you guys. You may be able to see in the beginning of the video that the largest fish actually has wen growth! Is there a specific name for a single tail with wen growth?

I have seen them before, they're just very fascinating fish. :)

I haven't seen any single-tailed variety in the history of goldies with a wen to be a specific breed with a name... Just enjoy its unusualness. :D

Edited by Chai

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I pretty much agree with what shakaho said but I'd like to suggest testing the old nasty looking water before adding any new water to it. It would be interesting to see the ammonia, nitrate, and ph numbers, and would give you a good idea of how the water compares to your current water. 

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I pretty much agree with what shakaho said but I'd like to suggest testing the old nasty looking water before adding any new water to it. It would be interesting to see the ammonia, nitrate, and ph numbers, and would give you a good idea of how the water compares to your current water.

i have a feeling the nitrates will resemble this mess.

GaDzkDpl.jpg

Goldfish can handle absurdly high nitrates .... In excess of 1000 mg/l :scared

The will to survive is strong in them.. Poor babies, though.

Edited by Chai

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Very possible. Only one way to find out.

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Good on you for being up to the task of rescuing these fish!!! I agree wither the other poster about taking as much of their tank water from their current set up. Such drastic change in environment will cause a lot of stress (don't be surprised if you have them in clean water for a month or so and they get sick).

I don't know what kind of money she is expecting for the tanks, they need a lot of elbow grease!!!!

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