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How do you get your fish so big?


ljk09

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I am in the beginning of starting a new tank for fancies. I am just wondering how you guys get yours so big? Do you get them as babies and feed them special food or is it some kind of ancient Chinese secret? :lol:

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It is also an important to NOT overstock your tank(s)!! 

 

(It doesn't make this one any easier that everytime you go into the goldie section they all to the ever adorable "PICK ME" dance!!!)

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Give them LOTS of room to grow, do large frequent water changes, and feed a variety of high quality food (which may include pellets, fresh vegetables, thawed frozen foods, and more).

 

That's really all there is to it. :)

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I dote on them like a grandma

 

My 15 goldfish have 900 gallons to play in, which is 60 gallons per fish. :happydance  I filter it at more than 3500 gallons per hour, with both a mechanical filter and a bio filter which I maintain regularly. And I make my own goldfish food, incorporating high quality commercially made food and natural organic produce. I've learned a lot via Koko's member's recommended best practices, like this thread. 

 

Since I have a pond, the water is not changed out regularly, but is replenished with rain water, and I vacuum out about 25 gallons of bottom mulm each quarter.

 

And even with all that, my koi is still considered small for her age. So quite a lot of potential adult size is about genetics.

 

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When I was feeding my fancies TetraFin flakes they didn't grow. At all. I switched over to Hikari Lionhead and suddenly, BAM, growth! I think Goldie's wen is developing :D 

So yes, food definitely plays a part.

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Put them in a pond.  People who move fish that have been receiving very fine care in an aquarium are often shocked at how fast they grow in the pond.  This is particularly true of fancies.

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Put them in a pond.  People who move fish that have been receiving very fine care in an aquarium are often shocked at how fast they grow in the pond.  This is particularly true of fancies.

 

Sharon, What is it about the pond environment that promotes growth?

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Put them in a pond.  People who move fish that have been receiving very fine care in an aquarium are often shocked at how fast they grow in the pond.  This is particularly true of fancies.

 

Sharon, What is it about the pond environment that promotes growth?

 

It's a buffet. They can graze and process food all day rather than gorge 2x per day, which is much less efficient.

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Yes, natural food, plus exercise, which stimulates the appetite.  Less stress because of a more consistent chemical environment; natural social structure, natural photoperiods, and diurnal temperature variations;  better filtration, better gas exchange because the surface area to volume ratio is usually much better than in aquariums.  

 

I don't know how much each of these contribute to growth, but they are all advantages, and fish do grow larger in ponds than aquariums.

 

But still, there are runts raised in ponds.  I have sibling wakin from the same spawn, raised in the same ponds, one of which is 8 inches s.l. and one that is 2.5 inches s.l.  If a fish is small by nature you aren't going to make it big.  

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Buy fish that are already big.  And don't expect to much from LPS fish. It is hit and miss with them.  I have more of them stay small then get big.  Enjoy them for who/what they are and not who/what you want them to be. Mine are pretty small. Even the two that stayed in a pond last summer.

Edited by Hidr
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Sunlight itself does also seem to promote growth, as well as gorgeous coloring. I know that putting my guys outside for the summer helped immensely to color them up and fill them out. 

 

 

Sunlight is great for ponds in the temperate zone, but the subtropical sun of FL can be harmful.  I observe redness on the dorsal side of my lighter colored fish in the summer, which appears to be sunburn.  This was supported by the veterinary professor who spoke at the Koi Show, who said that FL pond fish sunburned and had a high incidence of surface tumors because of the sun intensity.  

 

I haven't had fish show much color improvement when I moved them outside, but my sample is pretty small,  since most of my fish were "born" outside. 

Edited by shakaho
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Sunlight itself does also seem to promote growth, as well as gorgeous coloring. I know that putting my guys outside for the summer helped immensely to color them up and fill them out. 

 

 

Sunlight is great for ponds in the temperate zone, but the subtropical sun of FL can be harmful.  I observe redness on the dorsal side of my lighter colored fish in the summer, which appears to be sunburn.  This was supported by the veterinary professor who spoke at the Koi Show, who said that FL pond fish sunburned and had a high incidence of surface tumors because of the sun intensity.  

 

I haven't had fish show much color improvement when I moved them outside, but my sample is pretty small,  since most of my fish were "born" outside. 

 

Yikes! :o 

 

My fish indoors will look dull even under natural lighting, and brighten up when I move them outdoors. It's almost like the difference between a fry raised in a light bin and a fry raised in a dark one. 

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I feed small meals 4x per day so they're not just gorging all at once. And I have lots of plants in the tank (duckweed seems to be a big hit) to give them something extra to nibble on whenever they want. I actually don't have any lights on my tank because all my plants are ones that do fine with just simple sunlight. I like it natural :) They've been growing and doing great, but I'm still hoping when they're in the pond they'll do even better! 

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A great start to life with plenty of protein and clean water helps to secure a solid future.

I don't know what else I can add that hasn't already been mentioned, aside from keep things natural (i.e. Not overly clean, don't baby them too much, no random meds..).

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Don't forget, GENETICS is the main factor for well cared for fish. I have a good friend who is 6' 11" tall. His dad is about 6'6 and his mom is also over 6'. 

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In all honesty, I don't care if my fish get big.

 

My 1st wish for them is that they thrive and are healthy. 

My selfish wish is that they are attractive to me, which goes along with why I selected them.

 

I think small fish are especially cute, the way kittens and puppies are cute.

Edited by mysterygirl
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