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Anyone use an air stone in an open top tank?


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Anyone use an air stone in an open top tank?

 

How do you get on with the bursting bubbles wetting objects outside the tank?

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Yep. 

 

Add a control valve to the airline and turn down the air until it isn't a problem anymore. You should also have check valves on the airlines to prevent backsiphoning in case of a power outage.

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I have a really good pump that runs several things in my tank. I just adjusted it to exactly where I want it....Lots 'o bubbles but no mess!  (I second the CHECK VALVE thing!!)

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Carp do not require a lot of oxygen, and goldfish have amazing capacity for survival without oxygen, lasting for hours and even days in completely anoxic water. There are a number of people studying their remarkable ability to survive on anaerobic respiration. Here's an article: http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/280/1/R100  Here's another: http://csb.utoronto.ca/evidence-of-anoxia-induced-channel-arrest-in-the-brain-of-the-goldfish-carassius-auratus/  Just search "goldfish anoxia" and you will find dozens.

 

Healthy goldfish in a normal tank should not need aeration, particularly if there is a filter stirring up the water.  It would be desirable in a tall tank, when the prevailing temperature is high,  and it is certainly useful for sick fish.  Aeration may enhance the growth of young fish.  Even if the goldfish like it,  I can't stand noise of an air pump, and I have tried the ones that people claim are quiet.  

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Carp do not require a lot of oxygen, and goldfish have amazing capacity for survival without oxygen, lasting for hours and even days in completely anoxic water. There are a number of people studying their remarkable ability to survive on anaerobic respiration. Here's an article: http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/280/1/R100  Here's another: http://csb.utoronto.ca/evidence-of-anoxia-induced-channel-arrest-in-the-brain-of-the-goldfish-carassius-auratus/  Just search "goldfish anoxia" and you will find dozens.

 

Healthy goldfish in a normal tank should not need aeration, particularly if there is a filter stirring up the water.  It would be desirable in a tall tank, when the prevailing temperature is high,  and it is certainly useful for sick fish.  Aeration may enhance the growth of young fish.  Even if the goldfish like it,  I can't stand noise of an air pump, and I have tried the ones that people claim are quiet.  

I have to ask, though: Just because they can survive this, should we say that it's fine to provide them this environment? I've seen plenty of threads to state that just a filter is not always enough. "My fish is gasping at the surface." and all that.

 

Prussian carp are river fish, and therefore live in environments high in oxygen. Even those in lakes move into the mouth of the river that feeds it come winter, to avoid low oxygen levels.  (FWS.gov)

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I like bibbles too!!  I have SEVERAL bubbling doohickies!!!!

6 foot bubble wall, 2 bubble breathing Dragons and 2 bubble balls!!  AND 2 AC110s dumping water into the tank causing even more bubbles!!!

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Chelsea, no one is recommending goldfish be kept in axonic conditions.  

 

Unless you have a tall tank, the filter will circulate the  water just fine, bringing the water from the bottom to the top for aeration.  A fish that is gasping at the surface of a properly stocked and filtered tank is sick.  

 

Given an appropriate surface to volume ratio and some water circulation I see nothing to be gained by aeration except in the situations I listed above.  You have a different opinion, and that is fine.

 

Your link doesn't even agree with your statement.  The fact that a lake-dwelling fish would move to the open water of an adjacent stream when the lake freezes over does not make it a river fish.

 

 

“Inhabits a wide variety of still water bodies and lowland rivers, usually associated with
submerged vegetation or regular flooding. Can strongly tolerate low oxygen concentrations and
pollution (Kottelat and Freyhof 2007 [cited by Froese and Pauly (2010) but not accessed for this
report]).

 

Feral goldfish are found in ponds, lakes, and in the backwaters or slow moving  portions of rivers.  Goldfish are pond and lake fish by nature and thrive, not just survive, in those environments, often replacing native fish.  Here's a description of preferred habitat.

 

Goldfish were first introduced into Ohio around 1885 but have not become as well established as the common carp. They are abundant in the shallow bays and marshes of western Lake Erie and can be found in slow moving tributaries of Lake Erie as well. Elsewhere in Ohio goldfish have become established in some reservoirs such as Dillon, Dale Walborn, and others. They are more dependent on non-flowing water and abundant aquatic vegetation than common carp which is probably why they have not become as widespread as that species in Ohio.

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Chelsea, no one is recommending goldfish be kept in axonic conditions.  

 

Unless you have a tall tank, the filter will circulate the  water just fine, bringing the water from the bottom to the top for aeration.  A fish that is gasping at the surface of a properly stocked and filtered tank is sick.  

 

Given an appropriate surface to volume ratio and some water circulation I see nothing to be gained by aeration except in the situations I listed above.  You have a different opinion, and that is fine.

 

Your link doesn't even agree with your statement.  The fact that a lake-dwelling fish would move to the open water of an adjacent stream when the lake freezes over does not make it a river fish.

 

 

“Inhabits a wide variety of still water bodies and lowland rivers, usually associated with

submerged vegetation or regular flooding. Can strongly tolerate low oxygen concentrations and

pollution (Kottelat and Freyhof 2007 [cited by Froese and Pauly (2010) but not accessed for this

report]).

 

Feral goldfish are found in ponds, lakes, and in the backwaters or slow moving  portions of rivers.  Goldfish are pond and lake fish by nature and thrive, not just survive, in those environments, often replacing native fish.  Here's a description of preferred habitat.

 

Goldfish were first introduced into Ohio around 1885 but have not become as well established as the common carp. They are abundant in the shallow bays and marshes of western Lake Erie and can be found in slow moving tributaries of Lake Erie as well. Elsewhere in Ohio goldfish have become established in some reservoirs such as Dillon, Dale Walborn, and others. They are more dependent on non-flowing water and abundant aquatic vegetation than common carp which is probably why they have not become as widespread as that species in Ohio.

 

*And Lowland Rivers* :) (Although the link was more aimed at the oxygen levels and their preference for them than anything. Apparently they like it enough to follow it.)

 

Another example of this is the asian carp that inhabit rivers and waterways. Not exactly a goldfish, but a carp nonetheless. 

 

I know about the feral goldfish issue... and think it's pretty unnerving. It's interesting to know that they are more dependent on the aquatic vegetation than common carp. I had always assumed they shared most of the same food sources. 

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I have tons of bubbles in my tank and no top.  I just keep the water level a little lower (like to the bottom of the trim so you still can't see it through the glass) and no splashes!  It works great and my fish love the bubbles.

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I have a really bubbly air curtain and while my airpump sound is nearly silenced by being under the tank in the cabinet, I can't stand the sound of the bubbles themselves against the tank wall. It's been driving me nuts and I've wondered if it's necessary or better off in the baby goldfish tank....

My canister creates zero surface circulation, but I've drawn up the prototype for my own spray bar that would spray water in several directions... Would that be enough..? :hmm

I suppose this question is for Sharon or anyone who doesn't use an air pump with little to no surface agitation, if that's okay... :peeka

Chelsea, no one is recommending goldfish be kept in axonic conditions.   Unless you have a tall tank, the filter will circulate the  water just fine, bringing the water from the bottom to the top for aeration.  A fish that is gasping at the surface of a properly stocked and filtered tank is sick.   Given an appropriate surface to volume ratio and some water circulation I see nothing to be gained by aeration except in the situations I listed above.  You have a different opinion, and that is fine. Your link doesn't even agree with your statement.  The fact that a lake-dwelling fish would move to the open water of an adjacent stream when the lake freezes over does not make it a river fish. 

 “Inhabits a wide variety of still water bodies and lowland rivers, usually associated with

submerged vegetation or regular flooding. Can strongly tolerate low oxygen concentrations and

pollution (Kottelat and Freyhof 2007 [cited by Froese and Pauly (2010) but not accessed for this

report]).

 Feral goldfish are found in ponds, lakes, and in the backwaters or slow moving  portions of rivers.  Goldfish are pond and lake fish by nature and thrive, not just survive, in those environments, often replacing native fish.  Here's a description of preferred habitat. 

Goldfish were first introduced into Ohio around 1885 but have not become as well established as the common carp. They are abundant in the shallow bays and marshes of western Lake Erie and can be found in slow moving tributaries of Lake Erie as well. Elsewhere in Ohio goldfish have become established in some reservoirs such as Dillon, Dale Walborn, and others. They are more dependent on non-flowing water and abundant aquatic vegetation than common carp which is probably why they have not become as widespread as that species in Ohio.

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