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90 Gallon Filtration Options


stech

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So many choices K1 moving bed, ATI Hydro Sponge V , Poret HMF or  HOB using BioMax/Matrix/MarinePure for 90 Gallon tank. Which one would you choose?

 

I don't want to do sump or cannister concerns with overflows and leakage.

 

So trying to decide;

 

1. ATI Hydro V sponge would be simple and cost least I would add AC 70 for Mechanical filtration.  Should be very effective bio filtration but will have to clean sponge and its ulgy to in show tank.

 

2. K1 moving bed using air pump.  Should effective and I like the look of seeing the media tumbling.  No maintenance and easy to setup.

 

3. AC 110 using BioMax or Matrix or Ceramedia Marinepure.   Effective more expensive, motor load and water flow may be too strong for Ranchus.  Filters and media has to be clean.

 

Looks like K1 is best fitler option?

 

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AC 110 shouldn't be too strong in a 90g, you might need two of them actually.

How many GPH are the other two? I'm not familiar with them. :peeka

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I have an AC110 and a Sunsun 370GPH canister filter on one of my 55G and on my other 55G I have a smaller Sunsun 264GPH canister, ac70 and Aqueon 55/75 and I have ranchus in both tanks and they get along fine with the flow

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Concern is Bio filtration on tanks with sponge only filters there is minimum mechanical.

As it stands, your tank sounds like the aquarium will rapidly produce a ton of nitrates, really cloudy water, and a layer of decomposing excrement on the bottom.

Those are not qualities I try to achieve.

I'm curious as to how you intend to mitigate those problems, and why 'minimum' mechanical filtration appears to be one of your goals.

I'm not saying you're doing it wrong, but I will say I can't figure out what your motivation or end goal is. I'm no mind reader...

Edited by troy.telford
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Concern is Bio filtration on tanks with sponge only filters there is minimum mechanical.

As it stands, your tank sounds like the aquarium will rapidly produce a ton of nitrates, really cloudy water, and a layer of decomposing excrement on the bottom.

Those are not qualities I try to achieve.

I'm curious as to how you intend to mitigate those problems, and why 'minimum' mechanical filtration appears to be one of your goals.

I'm not saying you're doing it wrong, but I will say I can't figure out what your motivation or end goal is. I'm no mind reader...

Once cycled I will do 80% WC weekly may twice weekly if dirty. I now plan go with AC 110 (Biomax) and foam plus k1 moving bed. Tha AC should help with mechanical. I read a lot of successful tank using sponge only along with WC.

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For reference:

20ppm is the general max nitrate level for goldfish. Higher levels negatively impact their health, especially their immune system.

I have a 55 gallon with three medium sized goldfish; the largest is 120 grams. I do ~85% water change every five days. My nitrates are around 20ppm when I change the water.

Your tank is 65% bigger than mine, which means 5 fish is the equivalent bio load. You've said you intend to put in 9 fish which would make your bio load nearly double what my tank has.

More bio filtration will keep the ammonia and nitrites in check, but nitrates will only accumulate- and will do so rapidly. The only reliable way to get rid of them is with water changes.

You'll do fine at first, when the fish are small. As they grow, their bio load will grow, and I wouldn't be surprised if you have to do 80% water changes every 3 days (or less) to keep the nitrates below 20ppm - assuming your tap water has no nitrates in it like mine.

That many water changes gets old really fast.

Edited by troy.telford
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Nitrate is best removed by large WCs.  Some people use terrestrial plants such as pothos but if your tap water has zero to low nitrates, the best removal method is good ole WCs.  Filtration does not remove nitrate . . .

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Nitrate is best removed by large WCs. Some people use terrestrial plants such as pothos but if your tap water has zero to low nitrates, the best removal method is good ole WCs. Filtration does not remove nitrate . . .

I agree completely.

I've tried a few ways and spent a fair amount of money to filter nitrates without water changes. I've found none to be effective.

In some ways, I am starting to think the best metaphor for removing nitrates would be removing salt: Desalinization is possible, but it isn't practical or cheap.

It's also not just about nitrates. Nitrates are the 'litmus test' that's easy/cheap. It's often said that Nitrates are used to indicate when other water parameters (which aren't so easy to test) have probably also risen to undesirable levels.

I'm sure a guy with a really awesome planted tank could chime in and say his plants take care of some nitrates. The thing is planted tanks are yet another layer of effort, knowledge, and experience. I'm trying to do a planted tank, as I want real plants instead of plastic. I haven't been terribly successful so far.

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Salt does not do as much for nitrates as they do for the toxicity of nitrites.

I'm not sure I have ever had my nitrates affected by salt itself, but my plants were beyond unhappy with the salt being present, lessening their efficiency by causing root/leaf loss, and rising the nitrates by association. :idont

Edited by Chai
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Salt does not do as much for nitrates as they do for the toxicity of nitrites.

I'm not sure I have ever had my nitrates affected by salt itself, but my plants were beyond unhappy with the salt being present, lessening their efficiency by causing root/leaf loss, and rising the nitrates by association. :idont

Now I'm confused... I mentioned salt only as an example of something that's really only removed from a tank with a water change. ie. Not something you can filter. Edited by troy.telford
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Salt does not do as much for nitrates as they do for the toxicity of nitrites.

I'm not sure I have ever had my nitrates affected by salt itself, but my plants were beyond unhappy with the salt being present, lessening their efficiency by causing root/leaf loss, and rising the nitrates by association. :idont

Now I'm confused... I mentioned salt only as an example of something that's really only removed from a tank with a water change. ie. Not something you can filter.
Ah, I misread and thought you meant that it makes an impact on nitrates. :peeka I'm sorry, I didn't sleep much last night and have survived off chocolate today. :donthit:

Yes. Salt is a great example of nitrates in an aquarium. :teehee

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I'm sorry, I didn't sleep much last night and have survived off chocolate today. :donthit:

 

There was a week in my life where 100% of my calorie intake was Chocolate. A roommate got a 25 lb hershey bar, and was sick of chocolate. I was out of money... so vitamin pills & chocolate it was...

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Nitrate is best removed by large WCs. Some people use terrestrial plants such as pothos but if your tap water has zero to low nitrates, the best removal method is good ole WCs. Filtration does not remove nitrate . . .

I agree completely.

I've tried a few ways and spent a fair amount of money to filter nitrates without water changes. I've found none to be effective.

In some ways, I am starting to think the best metaphor for removing nitrates would be removing salt: Desalinization is possible, but it isn't practical or cheap.

It's also not just about nitrates. Nitrates are the 'litmus test' that's easy/cheap. It's often said that Nitrates are used to indicate when other water parameters (which aren't so easy to test) have probably also risen to undesirable levels.

I'm sure a guy with a really awesome planted tank could chime in and say his plants take care of some nitrates. The thing is planted tanks are yet another layer of effort, knowledge, and experience. I'm trying to do a planted tank, as I want real plants instead of plastic. I haven't been terribly successful so far.

 

 

 

 

Jim Writes -

 

Not only will a fully planted, well lit tank with CO2 use up all available nitrates, but you would need to pour in liquid nitrates every day to keep up with the demand and uptake of nitrates (and other ferts) by the plants to have a successful planted aquarium.

Edited by Jim_D
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