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Which plant is this?


bagh

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This plant is cheap and is very hardy. Can withstand most medications and still survive. It grows on bunches at regular intervals along a branch that looks like a stick.

 

What kind of plant is it? The storekeeper says it's called Bangkok-Amazon. But I'm (not) sure if there's a plant that goes by that name. I guess this is a tropical plant. She says she imports it from the far-east.

 

 

DSCN9781_zpspczv1m2z.jpg

 

If you need more pictures, please tell.

 

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Looks like some kind of sword, no idea which though

Umm.. Amazon sword?

 

 

No. Looks like a melon sword to me. Maybe even a red melon sword (they're hybrids, so they're not always red).

Edited by Kiara
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I think it's a sword (echinodorus), but I have no idea what variety. I can tell you your plants have come from a mother plant (unless you have that too) because those stick like things are actually runners leading to new plantlets.

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I think it's a sword (echinodorus), but I have no idea what variety. I can tell you your plants have come from a mother plant (unless you have that too) because those stick like things are actually runners leading to new plantlets.

 

Broad leaf swords don't tend to have runners, only narrow leaf (angustifolia) swords do, such as Vesuvius. Broad leaf swords have flower stalks that babies later come off of. The thick pieces of "leaves/runners" you see are actually flower stalks that have broken off. You can tell because they point up towards they surface. Runners tend to hide under the gravel and new plants pop up along the runners - another great example, although not swords, are Jungle Vals.

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I think it's a sword (echinodorus), but I have no idea what variety. I can tell you your plants have come from a mother plant (unless you have that too) because those stick like things are actually runners leading to new plantlets.

 

Broad leaf swords don't tend to have runners, only narrow leaf (angustifolia) swords do, such as Vesuvius. Broad leaf swords have flower stalks that babies later come off of. The thick pieces of "leaves/runners" you see are actually flower stalks that have broken off. You can tell because they point up towards they surface. Runners tend to hide under the gravel and new plants pop up along the runners - another great example, although not swords, are Jungle Vals.

 

 

You are correct. This is one of those times where I'm guilty of hobbyist jargon, but I don't think it matters too much. None of those runner growing swords put out stolons like a strawberry does, but they're still called runners despite the fact they're actually using a flowering stem. Several echinodorus species have been reclassified as helanthiums due to this; for example, bolivianus, tenellus, zombiensis, etc. If you're a hobbyist it's all a bit semantic. Amazon swords will put out runners. Some will grow horizontal, others vertical and flower. Just depends on how much light and whether it roots in the substrate I guess.

 

Helanthium tenellum is a good example of all this. Submersed it will grow these pseudostolons and propagate indefinitely (like in my photo below), but should you grow it emersed they'll flower instead. :)

15968615723_bc0f19ab7f.jpg

Edited by dan in aus
Rewrote and added photo.
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Such valuable information! Thanks a bunch, really! :D So it's melon swords with flower stalks, right?

 

Are these fully immersible plants? Or semi-aquatic ones?

Edited by bagho
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Such valuable information! Thanks a bunch, really! :D So it's melon swords with flower stalks, right?

 

Are these fully immersible plants? Or semi-aquatic ones?

 

Yep! Also, swords are the types of plants that can grow immersed or submerged.

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I'm not convinced it's echinodorus osiris. Submersed the leaves are rounder and lack the distinct point, whilst emergent the leaf is broader and reminds me of a few house plants. From the Copenhagen Botanical Gardens:

Echinodorus_uruguayensis_-_Copenhagen_Bo

Edited by dan in aus
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I have a couple of melon swords and am pretty confident in saying that its definitely not a melon sword.  I'm not an expert though so it could be a variety I'm not familiar with.

 

I do *think* its probably a thai amazon lily (or bua amazon according to the link below), which is not a super common plant as far as I can tell so there isn't a tonne of information on it, however this website has some good pictures for comparison, and a bunch of great info/advice on how to grow them :)

 

https://latzgardening.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/bua-amazon-or-thai-amazon-lily/

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Such valuable information! Thanks a bunch, really! :D So it's melon swords with flower stalks, right?

 

Are these fully immersible plants? Or semi-aquatic ones?

 

Yep! Also, swords are the types of plants that can grow immersed or submerged.

 

 

 

I'm not convinced it's echinodorus osiris. Submersed the leaves are rounder and lack the distinct point, whilst emergent the leaf is broader and reminds me of a few house plants. From the Copenhagen Botanical Gardens:

Echinodorus_uruguayensis_-_Copenhagen_Bo

 

 

I have a couple of melon swords and am pretty confident in saying that its definitely not a melon sword.  I'm not an expert though so it could be a variety I'm not familiar with.

 

I do *think* its probably a thai amazon lily (or bua amazon according to the link below), which is not a super common plant as far as I can tell so there isn't a tonne of information on it, however this website has some good pictures for comparison, and a bunch of great info/advice on how to grow them :)

 

https://latzgardening.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/bua-amazon-or-thai-amazon-lily/

WOW! Thank you so much for so much information! :) So it's Thai Amazon, right? Prolly, that's why the store owner said it's called Bangkok-Amazon. But indeed, there's hardly any information on the plant in the internet, if any.

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Today, I asked the store owner about some specifics of the plant. She said this plant is cultivated in Singapore and Thailand in the summer months, and stops growing completely by fall. It resumes its growth in spring. The oriental farms sell their stocks by fall. She imports a big lot from Singapore or Thailand.

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