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Anubis turning yellow?


MoonPi

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Afternoons..

I bought 2 really nice Anubis plants on January 7th, and now they are turning yellowish, and I've had some leafs come off.

I've wondered if the Oranda is to blame, but I can't be sure.

Any ideas?

What can I do to save them?? Should I be adding anything to the water??

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What kind of lighting do you have and how long do you keep the lights on per day?

Since the anubias roots are in gravel substrate, you'll most likely need root tabs. If the roots were totally exposed to the water (like they would be if they were attached to wood or a rock) then liquid fertilizers would work better.

Seachem flourish tabs should work.

Until you get the fertilizers reduce the photoperiod.

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What kind of lighting do you have and how long do you keep the lights on per day?

Since the anubias roots are in gravel substrate, you'll most likely need root tabs. If the roots were totally exposed to the water (like they would be if they were attached to wood or a rock) then liquid fertilizers would work better.

Seachem flourish tabs should work.

Until you get the fertilizers reduce the photoperiod.

I am using LEDs, and I'm keeping the light on for roughly 12 hours a day.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HSYGFQ/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I did buy the liquid Flourish last night, and added almost a capful last night.

Would taking them out of the substrate be better?

Edited by MoonPi
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What kind of lighting do you have and how long do you keep the lights on per day?

Since the anubias roots are in gravel substrate, you'll most likely need root tabs. If the roots were totally exposed to the water (like they would be if they were attached to wood or a rock) then liquid fertilizers would work better.

Seachem flourish tabs should work.

Until you get the fertilizers reduce the photoperiod.

I am using LEDs, and I'm keeping the light on for roughly 12 hours a day.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HSYGFQ/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I did buy the liquid Flourish last night, and added almost a capful last night.

Would taking them out of the substrate be better?

 

Your light looks like it is in the "low" light range (that's my best guess) which is fine for an anubias.

 

Did you get Seachem Flourish and not Seachem Flourish Excel? The former is mostly a micro fertilizer that contains trace elements and the latter is organic carbon. At this point, you want fertilizer. The Flourish will give you the micro ferts and trace elements you need (anubias need the calcium), but not the macro ferts you might need. I would not yet dose macro ferts yet though. I suggest following the directions below first. If you continue to have problems, then let us know.

 

Yes, you'll need to take the roots of the anubias out of the substrate in order for it to absorb the fertilizer in the water. You can super glue it onto a rock or some driftwood. See other threads on this forum about how to do that (there are some youtube videos on how to glue an anubias to a rock).

 

That said, once an anubias leaf is damaged the best thing to do is cut it off. The anubias plant will not focus energy to repair the damage on a leaf but it will focus energy to try to keep the leaf alive. Are there any healthy looking leaves left on any of the plants? Sometimes new leaves start out yellowish. Cut off any damaged leaves, leaving only the healthy ones. This will allow the plant to focus energy on healthy and new leaves, and not energy on keeping damaged leaves alive. Now if there are not any healthy leaves left, then you can try cutting all the damaged ones off and see if new ones grow back. I think they will. It will just look weird for a while with just the rhizome and roots.

 

With adding micro fertilizers in the water column and a 12 hour photoperiod, you may start to experience an algae growth in the tank. If this happens, reduce the photoperiod to 6-8 hours. I actually suggest reducing your photoperiod in any case to try to prevent too much algae growth and the need for adding other types of fertilizers.

Edited by LisaCGold
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Hi, sorry about your anubias.  How long has the plant been in the tank, and when did you first notice issues?

I see that the plant seems to be dropping leaves, which has happened to me on several occasions.  Sometimes it can happen when plants are moved into radically different environments, and others it's due to plant disease.  Take your plant in your hand, remove any mushy leaves/stems.  Next, take your plant and give the rhizome a good squeeze.  If it's soft, mushy, and brown, then it's not going to live.  If it's firm and green, it's fine; you can put it back in the tank.

 

If you do see that the rhizome is brown, try cutting off the brown bit.  You'll want to snip until just a bit past where you last saw any brown.  If you have massive quantities of expensive plants in the tank; it's better to just throw it out.  I lost probably about 200 dollars in anubias to rhizome rot about a year and a half ago.  It wasn't very fun...  If you only have one or two plants, it might be worth it to try to save.

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Hi,

The plant has been in the tank for 1 week & 6 days now.

When I did the water change today, I cut off one leaf off of one plant, and I cut off a couple of stems off the other.

I wish I saw these posts first. I didn't even think to squeeze the rhizome. One looks really good and green. The other is questionable.

I will pull the other one out of the tank tomorrow. If it's ok and not squishy, I will tie it to a rock. I don't have any glue.

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What kind of lighting do you have and how long do you keep the lights on per day?

Since the anubias roots are in gravel substrate, you'll most likely need root tabs. If the roots were totally exposed to the water (like they would be if they were attached to wood or a rock) then liquid fertilizers would work better.

Seachem flourish tabs should work.

Until you get the fertilizers reduce the photoperiod.

I am using LEDs, and I'm keeping the light on for roughly 12 hours a day.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HSYGFQ/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I did buy the liquid Flourish last night, and added almost a capful last night.

Would taking them out of the substrate be better?

Your light looks like it is in the "low" light range (that's my best guess) which is fine for an anubias.

Did you get Seachem Flourish and not Seachem Flourish Excel? The former is mostly a micro fertilizer that contains trace elements and the latter is organic carbon. At this point, you want fertilizer. The Flourish will give you the micro ferts and trace elements you need (anubias need the calcium), but not the macro ferts you might need. I would not yet dose macro ferts yet though. I suggest following the directions below first. If you continue to have problems, then let us know.

Yes, you'll need to take the roots of the anubias out of the substrate in order for it to absorb the fertilizer in the water. You can super glue it onto a rock or some driftwood. See other threads on this forum about how to do that (there are some youtube videos on how to glue an anubias to a rock).

That said, once an anubias leaf is damaged the best thing to do is cut it off. The anubias plant will not focus energy to repair the damage on a leaf but it will focus energy to try to keep the leaf alive. Are there any healthy looking leaves left on any of the plants? Sometimes new leaves start out yellowish. Cut off any damaged leaves, leaving only the healthy ones. This will allow the plant to focus energy on healthy and new leaves, and not energy on keeping damaged leaves alive. Now if there are not any healthy leaves left, then you can try cutting all the damaged ones off and see if new ones grow back. I think they will. It will just look weird for a while with just the rhizome and roots.

With adding micro fertilizers in the water column and a 12 hour photoperiod, you may start to experience an algae growth in the tank. If this happens, reduce the photoperiod to 6-8 hours. I actually suggest reducing your photoperiod in any case to try to prevent too much algae growth and the need for adding other types of fertilizers.

.

I bought the Seachem Flourish.

I did cut off some leaves and stems, but I didn't see this post soon enough. I'm going to pull the plant back out of the tank and check the rhizome, and take it out of the substrate.

Thanks so much for all the info! [emoji4]

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Hi, sorry about your anubias. How long has the plant been in the tank, and when did you first notice issues?

I see that the plant seems to be dropping leaves, which has happened to me on several occasions. Sometimes it can happen when plants are moved into radically different environments, and others it's due to plant disease. Take your plant in your hand, remove any mushy leaves/stems. Next, take your plant and give the rhizome a good squeeze. If it's soft, mushy, and brown, then it's not going to live. If it's firm and green, it's fine; you can put it back in the tank.

If you do see that the rhizome is brown, try cutting off the brown bit. You'll want to snip until just a bit past where you last saw any brown. If you have massive quantities of expensive plants in the tank; it's better to just throw it out. I lost probably about 200 dollars in anubias to rhizome rot about a year and a half ago. It wasn't very fun... If you only have one or two plants, it might be worth it to try to save.

$200?? WOW! I'm sorry!

So I can cut the rhizome?

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Hi, sorry about your anubias. How long has the plant been in the tank, and when did you first notice issues?

I see that the plant seems to be dropping leaves, which has happened to me on several occasions. Sometimes it can happen when plants are moved into radically different environments, and others it's due to plant disease. Take your plant in your hand, remove any mushy leaves/stems. Next, take your plant and give the rhizome a good squeeze. If it's soft, mushy, and brown, then it's not going to live. If it's firm and green, it's fine; you can put it back in the tank.

If you do see that the rhizome is brown, try cutting off the brown bit. You'll want to snip until just a bit past where you last saw any brown. If you have massive quantities of expensive plants in the tank; it's better to just throw it out. I lost probably about 200 dollars in anubias to rhizome rot about a year and a half ago. It wasn't very fun... If you only have one or two plants, it might be worth it to try to save.

$200?? WOW! I'm sorry!

So I can cut the rhizome?

 

I lost about half of my stock.  My tank was stuffed full of anubias.  I have much less now, but what I do have is very healthy.. :)

 

Does the rhizome seem mushy to you?  It should be firm and green.

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Hi, sorry about your anubias. How long has the plant been in the tank, and when did you first notice issues?

I see that the plant seems to be dropping leaves, which has happened to me on several occasions. Sometimes it can happen when plants are moved into radically different environments, and others it's due to plant disease. Take your plant in your hand, remove any mushy leaves/stems. Next, take your plant and give the rhizome a good squeeze. If it's soft, mushy, and brown, then it's not going to live. If it's firm and green, it's fine; you can put it back in the tank.

If you do see that the rhizome is brown, try cutting off the brown bit. You'll want to snip until just a bit past where you last saw any brown. If you have massive quantities of expensive plants in the tank; it's better to just throw it out. I lost probably about 200 dollars in anubias to rhizome rot about a year and a half ago. It wasn't very fun... If you only have one or two plants, it might be worth it to try to save.

$200?? WOW! I'm sorry!

So I can cut the rhizome?

I lost about half of my stock. My tank was stuffed full of anubias. I have much less now, but what I do have is very healthy.. :)

Does the rhizome seem mushy to you? It should be firm and green.

One is nice and green. The other is developing brown spots. I will try to get a picture.

As far as mushy, I honestly don't know. I didn't think to squeeze it.

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I think that the first one looks a little funky.  Take it out, and give it a feel.  Specifically try to give the brownish areas a little squeeze.  I think that one might be a goner, but I could be mistaken.  It does look like some of the other stems are going to start melting soon.

 

The second one I'd just pull off the melted stem, and let it grow.  If you see it start to deteriorate further, address it then.

 

Do you have kH/gH/pH readings for this tank?  I'm sorry if I missed it before, but it does help to give the big picture. :)

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