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Growing moss on to driftwood in Goldie aquarium


Annie

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  • Regular Member

Hi there!
I have some driftwood pieces that I have never used and I'm thinking I'd like to attempt to grow moss on to them, trying them out in aquarium. 

I have a few questions and would greatly appreciate any advise or tips to learn from you lovely fellow Koko members. 

First question: Best ways to prepare Driftwood and for how long? 

Second question: Best moss to grow that is likely to be most successful in terms of growing & staying uneaten & aesthetically pleasing?

Third question: How much light is required for growing moss?

Fourth question: Best ways/methods to attach the moss & what quantity is required for initial set up? 

If there is any other information you can think of to add please fill me in, I can't wait to hear from you and learn more. 
:thumbup2: 
Thank you kindly!

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Hi Annie,

I have moss growing on diftood both in my goldfish and my tropical tank. I'm by no means an expert but here is what I have done / read.

If you already have fish in your aquarium you will mist likely want to boil or at least soak your driftwoodcseperately before you add it to the tank. It will leach tannins and most likely won't sink immediately. I was a bad girl andvdidnt boil mine. Ibdidnt have fish in the tank so I just tied a big rock to my driftwood and let it settle in.

There are lots of types of moss and it is mainly up to your personal preference which one you choose. Some need more light or Co2 but most are pretty easy to grow. They grow in different directions and have different shapes. The easiest and most famous is java moss. Weeping moss as the name suggests droops down. Flame moss grows up. It's difficult to tell whether your fish will eat it until you try it. Two of my goodies aren't interested. The other one will however pick at in once in a while. It's always good to have a sacrificial plant that your goldfish love to eat and that keeps them distracted. Mine are floating water lettuce.

Light requirements can vary from moss to moss type. Most misses however don't need to much light. Saying that both my main tank and small tropical have strong light. The moss is closer to the light in the tropical and it has grown far bigger. This could also be due to the fish not eating it.

You are going to want to tie your moss down to a piece of wood or stone. ADA has special string but it is expensive. My LFS suggested to use cotton wool because it slowly dusinttegrates. It will take quite a while but your moss will start growing on the wood and then you can remove the string if it's too visible. The moss will come in a pot or bag. It us basically a mass of tiny plant strings. Try to lay them down in one direction and then wrap the string around it.

The greenmachine often mentions moss in their setups and show a good way of doing it. YouTube is your friend.

I hope you have lots of fun aquascaping.

Edited by Dandelion Blue
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  • Regular Member

Hi Annie,

I have moss growing on diftood both in my goldfish and my tropical tank. I'm by no means an expert but here is what I have done / read.

If you already have fish in your aquarium you will mist likely want to boil or at least soak your driftwoodcseperately before you add it to the tank. It will leach tannins and most likely won't sink immediately. I was a bad girl andvdidnt boil mine. Ibdidnt have fish in the tank so I just tied a big rock to my driftwood and let it settle in.

There are lots of types of moss and it is mainly up to your personal preference which one you choose. Some need more light or Co2 but most are pretty easy to grow. They grow in different directions and have different shapes. The easiest and most famous is java moss. Weeping moss as the name suggests droops down. Flame moss grows up. It's difficult to tell whether your fish will eat it until you try it. Two of my goodies aren't interested. The other one will however pick at in once in a while. It's always good to have a sacrificial plant that your goldfish love to eat and that keeps them distracted. Mine are floating water lettuce.

Light requirements can vary from moss to moss type. Most misses however don't need to much light. Saying that both my main tank and small tropical have strong light. The moss is closer to the light in the tropical and it has grown far bigger. This could also be due to the fish not eating it.

You are going to want to tie your moss down to a piece of wood or stone. ADA has special string but it is expensive. My LFS suggested to use cotton wool because it slowly dusinttegrates. It will take quite a while but your moss will start growing on the wood and then you can remove the string if it's too visible. The moss will come in a pot or bag. It us basically a mass of tiny plant strings. Try to lay them down in one direction and then wrap the string around it.

The greenmachine often mentions moss in their setups and show a good way of doing it. YouTube is your friend.

I hope you have lots of fun aquascaping.

this is what I did for my moss trees in my tanks and like said cotton based string such as sewing thread work well for attactching moss
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Hi Annie,

Do you know what type of wood it is or where it came from? Some woods are tannin heavy and do best when soaked or boiled (whatever is easiest for you). Boiling is faster, but for both you just want to keep changing the water until the wood no longer leaches anything.

Whether or not your fish eat the moss will be up to them. Unfortunately when it comes to goldfish no plants are 100% safe. As for attaching the moss there are a few options: super glue and fishing line/cotton thread are the most used, but if there are any crevices you can just force some moss in; it will attach with time. Another option is to blend the moss with yoghurt and paint it on, but this is for a dry start (where you grow the moss sans water in high humidity).

Different mosses requires different things--varying levels of light, nutrients, carbon source. If you're new to plants I would consider java moss. I know a lot of people write it off, but it's very easy to grow and, personally, I quite like the look of it. If you can't find it locally Dave and Robyn at Aquagreen usually have some in stock.

http://www.aquagreen.com.au/

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Thanks so much guys :) Will let you know how I go. I'd like to try the Java Moss, I have got some Java Fern that is going in on weekend. I'll be sure to  post some pictures in here as I progress. Thank you

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