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Some Underwater Garden Photos (Photo Heavy)


Daniel

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I know that feeling, Dan, especially when it comes to fish tanks! :rofl And yes, I meant the one in the video. :) I have a large (but not large enough yet!) sword with a row of bronze crypts in front of it, and that was a part of the tank he talked about. But mine and that one are still worlds apart. :rofl

 

Isn't it a great tank! I normally feel like a lot of those big echinodorus are too big for most tanks, but he's used them well in that behemoth. I would love something big too. Who needs a dining room? :rofl

 

Wow they look amazing! I'm jealous :rofl:

 

Thank you, Mandy. :)

 

WOAH  :goodjob

 

Thank you, Isa. :)

 

I don't have much to add to what everyone else has said. It's beautiful, and I know a lot of work. Great job!

 

Thank you, Rob. :)

 

It's actually not that much work to be honest. Besides feeding fish and dosing fertiliser which takes all of 5 minutes, it really only gets 40-60 minutes maintenance a week. Just a 50% water change (sometimes more), trim the plants and wipe down glass. 

 

Can I hire you?

PLEASE?!

 

Sure thing, Fang. :rofl

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Thank you so much for such thorough responses. :I-Thank-You:

This is my light fixture http://www.allpondsolutions.co.uk/aquarium-1/aquarium-lighting/aquarium-t5-lighting/120cm-t5-fish-tank-lighting-four-tubes.html (instead of the two marine bulbs I ordered it with two tropical) I am completely lost with PAR apart from the basic principle :blink: But luckily there seems to be quite a few adjustments I can make with this particular light fixture, I can slide the stand legs so there's a close/further distance to the water level and take out bulbs/ reflectors/ change bulbs etc.

 

The ammonia leaching in the first few weeks doesn't really bother me as I want to get plants well established in my tank before the fish but I didn't realise it would soften the water. That alone is probably enough reason to go for an inert substrate because I think I have quite a lot to consider (being a complete noob) without having to think about buffering :no:

 

Thanks for introducing me to the estimative index system, it looks pretty fool proof (meaning Millie proof :rofl3 ) and I guess if I encounter algae etc I will just have to fight it out with adjustments. If I follow it then am I right in thinking that the substrate I use doesn't really matter as long as it has a decent particle weight and density for plant roots?

 

( :o <-my face while looking at that tank) Wow, that is gorgeous. Definitely an inspiration for a few years time. I did look at glosso and you're right, it would be the easiest but I would really love something that looked more grassy. Can I ask your reasons against a finer leaf plant? Aesthetically I just wanted a very simple looking tank, almost minimalistic zen but still with some texture and scale...a field in a glass box :) I know goldfish can be pretty destructive when they decide a plant is tasty, but I plan on getting only two fish that aren't grown on yet, no more than 3" body length, so that they couldn't make too much mess in the beginning and feed them quite a varied herbivorous diet in the hopes that they would leave their surrounding intact. Either that or use a plant that could grow at a decent rate so that it wouldn't matter so much if it became an occasional snack. I guess glosso fits the bill there...      

 

Abstaining from using CO2 does seem sensible I guess. I was never going to use it once the goldfish were in the tank. Maybe I should be looking to start as I mean to go on...without CO2 until I have a bit more experience. Might have to read Alicia's tank blog some more to see how she does it. :)  haha, I agree, pearling is so lovely.

 

Thanks for clearing up the DSM, sounds like it's more effort than it's worth for me at the moment. And thank you for being so extremely helpful. I'm starting to think that maybe Glosso would be the way forward, it's not really the plant I was envisioning, but if there's a better chance of it being successful then that's good enough for me. Can always be more ambitious once I know what I'm doing :)

 

 

I'm actually somewhat familiar with that fixture. It was one of the ones I looked at when I was helping Alicia. It will be too much light sans co2, so throttling the amount of bulbs you use will be good. Having all bulbs on will be good for taking photos though. :)

 

There is nothing wrong with an inert sand, it won't turn to mud either. You just have to remember to dose the water column and supplement the substrate by adding root tabs (of course not needed if you use mosses/epiphyte type plants).

 

EI is pretty good, and since it requires large weekly water changes anyway it suits goldfish tanks rather well. Apart from that it is dead simple, everything is just teaspoon based. You can weigh things out if you want to be extremely precise, but you don't have to. At the end of the day it's all about finding what the plants want. I've noticed a lot of my stems seem to like extra potassium. I'm still yet to figure the rotala rotundifolia, which looks rather poor in my opinion. You can't tell in photos, but the leaves are mottled and it grows too fast for my liking. Another thing to consider (unless you happen to be Amano :P ) is plant placement. Hide stems behind things, this way you won't see the stem as they age. The tops always look brilliant when you hack them back and let them regrow, but the rest of the plant looses its leaves and looks rather sticklike. Less light gets to the bottom so the leaves die off. If you look at my row of rotala along the back, it's certainly healthy, but it only has leaves 1/3-1/2 way down the stem. Since it's so dense the leaves on the bottom receive no light and die off—this results in sticks. Of course you can't tell (and you probably wouldn't have known if I didn't tell you) because I have them hidden behind other plants, rocks, a random piece of wood, etc.

 

I suggested a bigger leaf type plant simply because I feel it would hold up better. I've not seen anyone successfully keep hair grass with goldfish (and I've never done it either). That said, lilaeopsis would probably hold up better, but I think helanthium tennellum (previously known as echinodorus tenellus) would be your best choice. It grows well, does low light too and can get of decent size. Unless you run co2 glosso will annoy you and it's clear you know what you want to do, so this plant doesn't fit the bill. It doesn't grow prostrate either without high light and with high light you need co2. So, basically, if you want an easy grass like plant, look at the helanthium. You could also consider the echinodorus species used in the video I posted, but it might be too big.

 

Oh my gosh Dan!!! It is absolutely stunning now!!!!! Like seriously professional looking.... one day I may attempt a fancy planted tankscape but I am too poor so I shall enjoy yours from afar :)

 

Thank you, Haley! :)

 

The tanks are amazing, Daniel, and somehow the corys make me thing of cows grazing. :rofl

 

Thank you, Alex! :) They really are cow like. I'm sure they would moo if they could. :rofl

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I'm actually somewhat familiar with that fixture. It was one of the ones I looked at when I was helping Alicia. It will be too much light sans co2, so throttling the amount of bulbs you use will be good. Having all bulbs on will be good for taking photos though. :)

 

There is nothing wrong with an inert sand, it won't turn to mud either. You just have to remember to dose the water column and supplement the substrate by adding root tabs (of course not needed if you use mosses/epiphyte type plants).

 

EI is pretty good, and since it requires large weekly water changes anyway it suits goldfish tanks rather well. Apart from that it is dead simple, everything is just teaspoon based. You can weigh things out if you want to be extremely precise, but you don't have to. At the end of the day it's all about finding what the plants want. I've noticed a lot of my stems seem to like extra potassium. I'm still yet to figure the rotala rotundifolia, which looks rather poor in my opinion. You can't tell in photos, but the leaves are mottled and it grows too fast for my liking. Another thing to consider (unless you happen to be Amano :P ) is plant placement. Hide stems behind things, this way you won't see the stem as they age. The tops always look brilliant when you hack them back and let them regrow, but the rest of the plant looses its leaves and looks rather sticklike. Less light gets to the bottom so the leaves die off. If you look at my row of rotala along the back, it's certainly healthy, but it only has leaves 1/3-1/2 way down the stem. Since it's so dense the leaves on the bottom receive no light and die off—this results in sticks. Of course you can't tell (and you probably wouldn't have known if I didn't tell you) because I have them hidden behind other plants, rocks, a random piece of wood, etc.

 

I suggested a bigger leaf type plant simply because I feel it would hold up better. I've not seen anyone successfully keep hair grass with goldfish (and I've never done it either). That said, lilaeopsis would probably hold up better, but I think helanthium tennellum (previously known as echinodorus tenellus) would be your best choice. It grows well, does low light too and can get of decent size. Unless you run co2 glosso will annoy you and it's clear you know what you want to do, so this plant doesn't fit the bill. It doesn't grow prostrate either without high light and with high light you need co2. So, basically, if you want an easy grass like plant, look at the helanthium. You could also consider the echinodorus species used in the video I posted, but it might be too big.

 

 

 

I thought my light may be a little too much but luckily that's easily fixed. I'm still not sure how long a photoperiod I should give my plants, I guess that's something I can decide on through trial and error. Though I'm thinking of doing a split photoperiod because of my daily routine, it'd be a shame not to be around for the majority of the time that the tank is lit.

 

Think I have a good plan for the nutrients/ferts now so thank you :) haha, I would never have guessed that any of your plants were nothing short of bushy perfection. Your tank is truly a well considered work of art. :thumb:  

 

That is great news, I really do like the helanthium tennellum, think it has the right amount of wildness :teehee I think that's what I'm going to go for (am secretly delighted that you didn't advise the glosso) Well, I'm going to buy the substrate today I think and get this tank into motion...nothing more depressing than waking up to an empty tank every morning :doh11:

Thank you so much, I feel really fired up to give this aquatic plant thingy a go :teehee  

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I thought my light may be a little too much but luckily that's easily fixed. I'm still not sure how long a photoperiod I should give my plants, I guess that's something I can decide on through trial and error. Though I'm thinking of doing a split photoperiod because of my daily routine, it'd be a shame not to be around for the majority of the time that the tank is lit.

Think I have a good plan for the nutrients/ferts now so thank you :) haha, I would never have guessed that any of your plants were nothing short of bushy perfection. Your tank is truly a well considered work of art. :thumb:

That is great news, I really do like the helanthium tennellum, think it has the right amount of wildness :teehee I think that's what I'm going to go for (am secretly delighted that you didn't advise the glosso) Well, I'm going to buy the substrate today I think and get this tank into motion...nothing more depressing than waking up to an empty tank every morning :doh11:

Thank you so much, I feel really fired up to give this aquatic plant thingy a go :teehee

I suggest starting off with a small photoperiod and increasing slowly from there. Start with 5 hours and don't exceed 8 would be my advice. I run mine for about 6, I think. I can't remember what my timers are set for.

It's all an illusion. :rofl Die off is inevitable unless you're Amano (I have no idea how he grows 4ft bushes of stem plants perfect all the way down). There are ways to keep leaves down the bottom, but it requires more work and isn't needed here (I'm lazy). Basically you pull them out instead of trimming, trim the tops and replant only them. Some species only cope with this method of pruning actually. The more plants you try the more you'll learn. It's definitely a matter of experience reigning king.

Good luck with everything! I'd love to see how you get on. :)

Dan you are an artist. Now come an aquascape my aquarium :P

Thank you, Cat. :) Fly me to the UK and you're on. :rofl Edited by dan in aus
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:tomuch: grazing cattle :) beautiful aquarium :thud

Your thumbs are so green! I'm jealous! I think you and Lis should get together with your beautiful planted tanks :ehh

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:tomuch: grazing cattle :) beautiful aquarium :thud

Your thumbs are so green! I'm jealous! I think you and Lis should get together with your beautiful planted tanks :ehh

 

Naughty Aubrey is naughty. :wa You're as bad as Lisa. :rofl

 

Thank you though. :)

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