Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BrettFish

Cooling tanks for spawning.

Recommended Posts

I know that you're supposed to cool down your goldfish's water in order to breed them in an aquarium. What I can't figure out is how. I don't have the money for a chiller so I'm sort of stuck. Can anyone give me some advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do a large WC and replace the water with cooler water .. . . :idont

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Letting a fan blow across the top of the water can cool it a bit also

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not understand why you should and where it says so?

Goldfish breeders usually hybernate the fish for a couple of months, this will stop spawning untill the fish get into warmer water and 'feel' it is spring again. This way you get an entire group ready to spawn. Unlike during summertime when fish sometimes just keep spawning randomly. The fish need to go into this hibernation period healthy, well prepared and with good reserves.

Maybe it can trigger spawning, but any temperature change can. Also increasing temperature or leaving the lights on at night can trigger spawning if they are ready.

Key is that the fish are ready to spawn and a single drop in temperature would probably not give you the result you are looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah stupid me, i found it!

It clearly says to cool the fish for a couple of weeks.

So this would mean to move them to an unheated room or garage during fall, winter or spring for a hybernation period.

I personally would suggest to be carefull with heavy feeding while hybernating, note that GF are not as healthy or strong during hybernation. I will respond to the sticky when i have read it all, but i would start heavy feeding/WC routine when gradually building up temperature again after a hybernation period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that a good way to do this indoors would be to feed heavily in foods like frozen bloodworms or a spawning/conditioning food like Repashy Spawn and Grow. At this time your fish are going to really need to get all the nutrition they can. (Don't overfeed! 2% of the fish's bodyweight or so per day.) Unplug the heater and let the tank get to room temperature. The best time to do this would be a day or two before a big storm rolls through your area. Leave a window cracked so that the fish get the fullest effect of the change in barometric pressure and drop in temperature that naturally occurs right before a big storm. Add your spawning mops. Plug your heater back in (set to about 3 degrees warmer than the water temperature the day of the storm) and watch for signs of spawning. Spawning should occur first thing in the morning as the sun comes up. :)

Outdoors, you'll have to wait for spring. Everything usually happens on its own after hibernation, like Hinfin said. Just add some spawning mops or floating plants with big root systems and wait. They'll give you what you want all spring and summer long.

So have you decided on what traits you are breeding for yet?

Edited by ChelseaM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that a good way to do this indoors would be to feed heavily in foods like frozen bloodworms or a spawning/conditioning food like Repashy Spawn and Grow. At this time your fish are going to really need to get all the nutrition they can. (Don't overfeed! 2% of the fish's bodyweight or so per day.) Unplug the heater and let the tank get to room temperature. The best time to do this would be a day or two before a big storm rolls through your area. Leave a window cracked so that the fish get the fullest effect of the change in barometric pressure and drop in temperature that naturally occurs right before a big storm. Add your spawning mops. Plug your heater back in (set to about 3 degrees warmer than the water temperature the day of the storm) and watch for signs of spawning. Spawning should occur first thing in the morning as the sun comes up. :)

Outdoors, you'll have to wait for spring. Everything usually happens on its own after hibernation, like Hinfin said. Just add some spawning mops or floating plants with big root systems and wait. They'll give you what you want all spring and summer long.

So have you decided on what traits you are breeding for yet?

As far as traits, I'm not looking to breed a blue ribbon fancy. This is going to be my first breeding attempt so as long as they're happy and healthy, I'm satisfied. So, from what I'm gathering from these post's, would it work to turn the heater for a couple months then drop it back to its original temp to mimic winter? Or am I way off?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winter is quite a bit colder than your ambient room temperature. So no, it wouldn't work.

How I explained it for indoors is made to condition spawning behavior over a matter of days. (Now, because this sounds too good to be true, I have to add the disclaimer that it doesn't always work. Your fish have to be ready for it.) Outdoors, the same process would take months. In the end, though, you only need to get one good spawn to try raising fry for the first time. So spawning could just happen out of nowhere. First things first, though, you need to get the fish into a proper environment. Once they are there, we can design a more complete spawning suggestion for you. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winter is quite a bit colder than your ambient room temperature. So no, it wouldn't work.

How I explained it for indoors is made to condition spawning behavior over a matter of days. (Now, because this sounds too good to be true, I have to add the disclaimer that it doesn't always work. Your fish have to be ready for it.) Outdoors, the same process would take months. In the end, though, you only need to get one good spawn to try raising fry for the first time. So spawning could just happen out of nowhere. First things first, though, you need to get the fish into a proper environment. Once they are there, we can design a more complete spawning suggestion for you. :)

How much room would be needed for just a breeding pair? My fancies are just two inches or so, so I'll be breeding my commons or one of them with my comet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like I said in your other thread, we recommend on this forum to have 20 gallons per fish to start. A 40B (40 gallon breeder, technically holds ~47 gallons) aquarium is a good place to start for two fish.

I think that you might want to think about what you would like to breed for, even though you are just starting out. In the end, you are going to wind up with quite a few babies that need homes. Not many people choose to buy "mutt" goldfish over goldfish that actually fit a type. No, they don't have to be show quality, but it would be better if the fish was true-to-form. If you want to breed to your comet, I would suggest breeding the commons. This way, you end up with lots of beautiful single-tailed goldfish. :) And since you're just starting out, it's sometimes nicer to go with a hardier variety. Fancies generally are hardy, but they just aren't as easy as single-tailed fish. That's my opinion for you to take as you want. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the plan! :thumbup2: I posted a request for a tank on craigslist so I'll see what I can do :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look for more than 1 tank. You'll need to keep momma, daddy, and babies separate until the babies are too big for their parents to eat. Dividers do not work, because goldfish fry need very shallow tanks as they age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And are there any other methods of cooling besides fans and moving the tank?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brett, there are many, many people here with fish that spawn without formal cooling. I wouldn't get hung up on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brett, there are many, many people here with fish that spawn without formal cooling. I wouldn't get hung up on it.

That's great to know! I read that a healthy, high protein diet helps. Is there anything I'm missing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How big should the fry tank be?

I am planning to use a 10-gallon tank. Some people use buckets. It really depends on how many fry you have. If you have hundreds, you will need to increase the tank size - but you should be culling as you go for deformities and undesirable traits, especially if you have a lot of fry. The reason why this is so important is that the poor-quality fry compete for food and space with the high-quality fry - and in some cases, like fancies born with single tails, the defect makes those fish more competitive than the higher-quality, but weaker, fish - so you could end up with a bunch of strong, but low-quality, fish.

When I had fry last time, I took them out of the 10-gallon tank and put them in a pitcher while I did my water changes so that I could use my Python freely. I had the temp set at 75F. This worked well for me because I had less than 20 fry, so they weren't hard to catch. But if you have a lot, it may be better to do the "bucket to bucket" method, where you fill up 2 buckets with water, and switch the fry back and forth, changing the water out of the bucket they were in after moving them. That way, the water is kept at a consistent temperature, which is important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...