Jump to content

Best Water Changers?


Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Ok so some of you know that I want to upgrade my Goldfish's tank from his 20 gallon long tank to a 40 gallon breeder tank :thumbup2: But...My Fiancé doesn't really want me too because then we'd have to change out 20 gallons of water instead of 10 gallons. He doesn't like this idea seeing we use a siphon vaccume hose and a 5 gallon bucket to put the waste water from the tanks in, plus we use 1 gallon water jugs to replace the water in the tanks. That is a lot of time consuming work but I don't mind too much but he does mind. :thumbdown

So... I seen water changers on Amazon and thought of getting one to make changing Dreamsicle's tank water easier and faster. He agreed to let me get a 40 gallon tank if I buy one of these water changers. :bingo:

But what kind is best to use? I seen 3 on Amazon to choose from. Not sure what others are out there. :hummm

Marina Easy Clean Water Changer

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00101BYOO/ref=s9_psimh_gw_p199_d0_i3?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0Y6MNADZXYMBPRD6MXYY&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846

Aqueon Aquarium Water Changer

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000YAJKL6/ref=s9_psimh_gw_p199_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=05V5EHYGAPSMV1WXF2WW&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846

Python No Spill Clean & Fill Aquarium maintenance system

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000255NXM/ref=s9_psimh_gw_p199_d0_i3?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=04EDG5Q54NQ3X421X4ND&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1688200382&pf_rd_i=507846

The thing is, is that I read some of the reviews and they all say that the other kind is bad. Marina says Aqueon and Python are cheap and break easy, and Python says Aqueon is flimsy cheap plastic, and Aqueon says that Python and Marina are bad and that Marina is the best.

So confusing! I don't know who to believe or trust from those reviews! :wall:wacko::help:

Anyone here use these brands of water changers? I'd trust you guys better than those reviews from "strangers" because I "know" you people here :grouphug:thumb:;):hug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I had the aqueon at first, but always had issues with it. In a few months I switched to the Python. I vote Python. They will last a very long time and are built to. They're worth every penny, and the best investment i have made.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I have an Aqueon, but I use Mikey's system now. I don't use the pot and plate for refilling, and I use a bucket in the kitchen sink. I like this better than the water changer. I recently moved, and none of the faucets takes the Aqueon!

I pump the tank water out the door and into my landscaping, and I refill my fish bucket in the sink. I never hook anything up or unhook anything. It's faster and super easy.

Thanks again for this tip, Mikey!!! It saved my bacon when we got here and I couldn't use my water changer! :hug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I love the Python. I used buckets for years at my boyfriend's house, to do water changes on his 3 tanks (which totaled 115 gallons!). Now, I could not imagine doing that again. :)

Be aware that your sinks may not be equipped to screw in a water changer. The type of sinks it works for as is are the ones where the threads are exposed, which I believe is more common in older sinks or basin-type sinks. I don't have this type of sink at my house, so I use the outdoor hose faucet on my patio. Other options involve doing work on your sink faucet so the threading is exposed, or some people here buy a pond pump in addition to the water changer to fill the tank.

Finally, be sure you measure the distance from the sink to the tank. The Python comes in 25 feet and 50 feet. If the distance is longer than 50 feet, you can also buy lengtheners to lengthen it indefinitely. I made the mistake of assuming it couldn't be more than 25 feet from one end of Mario's apartment to the next when I bought him one as a gift, so I had to buy a lengthener. I would have saved money if I'd just bought the 50-foot Python.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Do take a good look at Mikey's pump system. It has two important advantages: 1) Water removal is absolutely safe for your fish. The pump has a fine grill on it and a sponge inside the grill. You have a much higher chance of sucking a small fish into your filter than into a pond pump. Even if you walk away (not recommended), the pump won't suck the tank dry. Python accidents may not be common, but they do happen and the results are not pleasant.

2) If you pump water from a bucket by the faucet, you can dechlorinate the water in the bucket so no chlorinated water goes into the tank. I am, over all, probably the least paranoid experienced fishkeeper here. But I admit to being absolutely paranoid about putting chlorinated water into a tank with fish in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I actually prime my tank as I'm filling up with the pump. We don't have chlorine in our water, but we do have other things that have made my girls act "off" when I've forgotten to prime after a water change. It's really effective and easy to change water with it. I turn my tub faucet up to a pressure where the bucket is not overflowing and wasting water, but also not leaving the bucket empty. :Jig:

I use this to make sure the hose doesn't fly out and make a mess.

J66bYuF.jpg

Best thing I've ever done was buy a pump water changer.

Edited by Chai
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Ahhh yes great info! So now I have to check my faucets to see if I have the screw threads on the outside to see if I can even use a python or Aqueon type water changer :hummm

But the pump idea looks good as well :hummm But with the pump idea, how to you "vacuum" the substrate and/or tank bottom? I've got gravel right now but may change to sand or bare bottom when I can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Ahhh yes great info! So now I have to check my faucets to see if I have the screw threads on the outside to see if I can even use a python or Aqueon type water changer :hummm

But the pump idea looks good as well :hummm But with the pump idea, how to you "vacuum" the substrate and/or tank bottom? I've got gravel right now but may change to sand or bare bottom when I can.

Using Mikey's way with just the pump, you can't vacuum the gravel out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I don't use it to vacuum normally, but you can take off the cover that has the holes to expose the pump intake. Hovering it over your substrate would suck everything up off a sandy substrate. I've used it for that on several occasions and it's pretty neat.

RqOPMJ7l.jpg

The three prongs you see are not the impeller and do not turn. They're the cover/protector of the impeller inside the pump.

Edited by Chai
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Just use gravity ;) take the tubing off the pump and just vacuum it out. when you are all done reconnect the pump and pump out the rest of the water.

Edited by Mikey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Also, if you get a Python or Aqueon water changer, I would suggest using something to cover the end of the tube to prevent injury to your fish. Some people buy the Claw attachment by Lee's. I just took an unused filter bag, cut it into a square, secured it to the end of the tube with a rubber band, and cut 3 ~3/4-inch holes in it with scissors. This works perfectly for me because the holes make it large enough to suck up poop and other debris, but not too large where the fish could get sucked up or injured. [emoji4]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Just seen this written by Goldiegeek on Mikey's pump link:

*When I use this method, I attach a tube to the "suck" part of the pump. Then I attach the siphon to the end of it. I then attach a tube to the "blow" part and put it in my laundry sink. That way I can do a gravel cleaning as well. I noticed that it gives your siphon a little boost. I always say I'm going turbo when I plug the pump in lol. I also have a floor tank. This is perfect as the siphon on its own won't pick up anything. I am so glad that Mikey shared this. It really makes things a LOT easier. Especially if you have multiple tanks.*

So can I do this like Goldiegeek? I don't see a "Suck" and a "Blow" parts of the pump though :idont

Also I just checked my sink faucets, the Kitchen one the threads are inside of the tap and the bathroom one I can not get off! I'd hate to ruin the faucets seeing that I rent. Plus they just replaced the sinks and faucets right before I moved in and that was just a short time ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The intake is what I showed you in the photo, the out is the tube. When you're doing the water change you put the pump in the tank and the hose end in a tub. To fill it back up, you put the pump in a bucket (under your tub faucet!) and the hose end in the tank, secured.

To gravel vacuum (...if you do have gravel) you could just kinda shove the pump under the gravel a bit WITH the cover over the intake that it comes with, and it would do the job. :idont

There's really nothing complicated about this pump, I assure you. :rofl You could even try your own ways of gravel vacuuming but I'd personally just use a hand siphon to clean the gravel when the water level gets lower so I can see what I'm doing easily and get whatever floats around out of my tank. ^_^

Edited by Chai
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Goldiegeek must have an in-line pump. With these, you can attach a hose or pipe to an inlet as well as to the outlet. These pumps can be used outside the pond as well as submerged. The basic submersible pumps have no way you can attach a pipe/hose to the inlet. Chai's ideas are very creative. Siphons work fine for cleaning gravel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

About the python adapter: If you remove the white rubber ring, you will expose the female threads for sinks that have their threads on the outside. If the threads are on the inside, just screw the adapter in like normal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I have the Aqueon and it's been doing it's job. I did have another aqueon prior to this one. Part of the plastic had cracked where you tighten it up on the faucet. With the crack it wasn't working as great because water was leaking out. So I purchase my second one over 18 months or so ago and have had no problem. I don't tighten it up too much now for I was thinking that's what made the plastic crack. (from the pressure of the water perhaps.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...