Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jen

Sand/Gravel mix?

Recommended Posts

79fca330f9bc3bee364c144f5439026c.jpg

This is the variegated PFS that I use. As an ex-graveler I find it a good substrate for me. It's large enough that my gravel vacuum and filter intakes require no extra precautions, heavier than gravel so great for planting in (as I can finally vacuum around my plants without fear of the roots becoming dislodged, all the junk sits on top!), and looks similar to my gravel did.

If you decide to go to a different substrate than gravel this would be my personal suggestion, especially if you find the silt like sands a lot to deal with, or too starkly coloured.

Mine looks a lot like that. I really like the color.
Thank you! I think if I were ever to have a tank goal it would be a Walstrad based biotope, but realistically my ranchu aren't native to anywhere. I'm going to settle for as natural as possible and this sand seemed like a safe option to that end :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a sand/gravel mix now. I had always kept gravel in all my tanks (never had an issue), and wanted to try sand for a change, so I bought CaribSea Super Naturals Moonlight sand. Unfortunately, it presented several problems for me: 1) it got all over my fish and stuck to their bodies, which may have irritated them, 2) it got into my filter, and 3) when the GF would poop, the poop would get coated in sand, which made it too dense to be picked up by my Python or filter - it would just swirl around in the Python gravel vac but wouldn't go up. The poop also rested on top of the sand, and looked really gross, especially because my sand is white. I had to remove those pieces manually - yuck!

I recently added Activ-Flora Lake Gems gravel over the sand, which is a nutrient-enriched gravel for planted tanks. My plants are doing amazing, and the tank looks much cleaner and more visually appealing to me than stark white sand. I guess I'm a gravel girl deep down ... :rofl

I'd like to point out that sand getting 'stuck to the fish' is not problematic in the slightest. It just gets stuck to their slime coat and in no way irritates them. Sand is the carps natural substrate and it's important to remember this. Smaller gravel does concern me because if it is small enough to be ingested it can cause internal issues such as a blockage or tear in the GI tract. A fish will not choke unless the gravel lodges itself in such a way that it prevents the mouth from functioning properly which would hold the gills shut.

I'd say my fish certainly seem to 'enjoy' sand more. They spend more times sifting through it because it's much easier than sifting through gravel. Definitely not condoning gravel as it can be a fine substrate if you're dedicated to cleaning it thoroughly, just giving my information and input. :)

Oh yes, my fish definitely seemed to enjoy sifting through the sand. It was also fun to see them rake it through their gills and spit it out.

As far as irritation goes, I want to clarify that I did not observe any signs of this in my fish even though they were covered in sand. However, I still wanted to mention it because in this recent thread Red thought the sand being stuck to the slime coat was irritating one of her fish: http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/118142-back-to-sand/page-2 She observed flashing and other signs of discomfort, and this behavior stopped as soon as she removed the sand. I don't know if this was a coincidence or not, but it is interesting that the fish's condition improved immediately afterward - unless it could have been caused by something else related to that particular sand, but a lot of people use TMS so I don't know. The sand I had is similar to TMS and by the same manufacturer, but is even finer.

It seems purely coincidental to me. :/ it's just important to not spread around misinformation. A while back someone started claiming that their sand irritated the gills of their fish (which is also untrue). I don't want this to become one of those things. I'm my trying to attack or admonish you in any way. This is just something I like to reiterate
No worries - I definitely want someone to let me know if something I say is incorrect, since that's how we learn! I did not see any comments in that thread disagreeing or saying that it was unlikely that the flashing was caused by the sand itself, so I had figured it was a reasonable conclusion. It can be difficult to distinguish fact from myth in this hobby because so much of what is said is based on people's own observations.

So are you saying that it would still be unlikely that the flashing was caused by the sand even if the sand was somewhat sharp (which seemed to be one of her concerns, along with the fineness of it - but your article said fineness wasn't a problem)? I just read your article and it was very informative - always nice to read something that further explains an issue based on science.

It would be great to have a list of common fishkeeping myths, since there seem to be so many! Seems like I learn about a new one every month.

Edited by *Amanda*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a sand/gravel mix now. I had always kept gravel in all my tanks (never had an issue), and wanted to try sand for a change, so I bought CaribSea Super Naturals Moonlight sand. Unfortunately, it presented several problems for me: 1) it got all over my fish and stuck to their bodies, which may have irritated them, 2) it got into my filter, and 3) when the GF would poop, the poop would get coated in sand, which made it too dense to be picked up by my Python or filter - it would just swirl around in the Python gravel vac but wouldn't go up. The poop also rested on top of the sand, and looked really gross, especially because my sand is white. I had to remove those pieces manually - yuck!

I recently added Activ-Flora Lake Gems gravel over the sand, which is a nutrient-enriched gravel for planted tanks. My plants are doing amazing, and the tank looks much cleaner and more visually appealing to me than stark white sand. I guess I'm a gravel girl deep down ... :rofl

I'd like to point out that sand getting 'stuck to the fish' is not problematic in the slightest. It just gets stuck to their slime coat and in no way irritates them. Sand is the carps natural substrate and it's important to remember this. Smaller gravel does concern me because if it is small enough to be ingested it can cause internal issues such as a blockage or tear in the GI tract. A fish will not choke unless the gravel lodges itself in such a way that it prevents the mouth from functioning properly which would hold the gills shut.

I'd say my fish certainly seem to 'enjoy' sand more. They spend more times sifting through it because it's much easier than sifting through gravel. Definitely not condoning gravel as it can be a fine substrate if you're dedicated to cleaning it thoroughly, just giving my information and input. :)

Oh yes, my fish definitely seemed to enjoy sifting through the sand. It was also fun to see them rake it through their gills and spit it out.

As far as irritation goes, I want to clarify that I did not observe any signs of this in my fish even though they were covered in sand. However, I still wanted to mention it because in this recent thread Red thought the sand being stuck to the slime coat was irritating one of her fish: http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/118142-back-to-sand/page-2 She observed flashing and other signs of discomfort, and this behavior stopped as soon as she removed the sand. I don't know if this was a coincidence or not, but it is interesting that the fish's condition improved immediately afterward - unless it could have been caused by something else related to that particular sand, but a lot of people use TMS so I don't know. The sand I had is similar to TMS and by the same manufacturer, but is even finer.

It seems purely coincidental to me. :/ it's just important to not spread around misinformation. A while back someone started claiming that their sand irritated the gills of their fish (which is also untrue). I don't want this to become one of those things. I'm my trying to attack or admonish you in any way. This is just something I like to reiterate
No worries - I definitely want someone to let me know if something I say is incorrect, since that's how we learn! I did not see any comments in that thread disagreeing or saying that it was unlikely that the flashing was caused by the sand itself, so I had figured it was a reasonable conclusion. It can be difficult to distinguish fact from myth in this hobby because so much of what is said is based on people's own observations.

So are you saying that it would still be unlikely that the flashing was caused by the sand even if the sand was somewhat sharp (which seemed to be one of her concerns, along with the fineness of it - but your article said fineness wasn't a problem)? I just read your article and it was very informative - always nice to read something that further explains an issue based on science.

It would be great to have a list of common fishkeeping myths, since there seem to be so many! Seems like I learn about a new one every month.

I don't want to negate Reds observations and say it wasn't the sand but I'd be willing to bet it was an issue with that batch of sand or something else entirely. I've never noted issues with even very fine sands. I have had moonlight in a few tanks for a few years and I've had fish get covered in it while sifting through it. They seem to enjoy themselves. My point is we shouldn't fear sand or any other substrate, or admonish it, without solid evidence to support a claim. I still think sand is the substrate best suited for goldfish based on their ancestral carps habitat and their current anatomy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought I'd let you all know I put a small amount in. She picks it up, but spits it straight out. Thanks for all the help! :thumbup2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

79fca330f9bc3bee364c144f5439026c.jpg

This is the variegated PFS that I use. As an ex-graveler I find it a good substrate for me. It's large enough that my gravel vacuum and filter intakes require no extra precautions, heavier than gravel so great for planting in (as I can finally vacuum around my plants without fear of the roots becoming dislodged, all the junk sits on top!), and looks similar to my gravel did.

If you decide to go to a different substrate than gravel this would be my personal suggestion, especially if you find the silt like sands a lot to deal with, or too starkly coloured.

Mine looks a lot like that. I really like the color.

This is what I have except in a lighter colour. I almost chose that colour, kind of wishing I had now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...