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Smurfishy

air bubble disease

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It's 3:30am and I noticed my fish not doing well. One in particular that I have had the longest. I have well water and it's happened a couple times before. I'm not site if there is anything I can do to help. I just did a water change. Had to do two back to back due to getting a bunch of icky filter water in the tank after the first change. People in the past doubted me on this, so I took a video of my poor seymora. She has been with me since 2009. I hope she makes it. If you notice the other fish in the video also have bubbles at the base of their tails.

Air bubble disease: http://youtu.be/QlJoAy4WC8s

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Oh gosh, poor little thing :( I truly hope she get better :hug

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She did not make it the night. I have two fish bottom sitting, hopefully they turn out OK.I think they should be fine.

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I'm so sorry for your loss. :hug

I'm also on a deep water well, and this is always a worry of mine.

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Hi Smurfishy - are the 'bubbles' transparent and see-through like real bubble or are they opaque? Sorry but I'm unable to see the video clearly...

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I am so sorry for your loss :(

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Very sorry for your loss.

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They are both. All my fish have them right now in all Thier fins. I was rubbing her Fin with my finger to show that it wasn't something that was on the outside. The fun rays are bent where the bubbles are occupying space.

Hi Smurfishy - are the 'bubbles' transparent and see-through like real bubble or are they opaque? Sorry but I'm unable to see the video clearly...

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Are they blisters on the fins?

I'm so sorry for your loss

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Are there any other symptoms showing in the fins or is it just the bubbles?

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So sorry :(

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the photos you displayed are typical of Gas Bubble Disease. there is no good news here for the fish, unfortunately, since there is no treatment for the actual fish themselves. the only way you can prevent this attack on your future fish is to eliminate the problem within the water supply.

Gas Bubble Disease is oversaturated air in the water. this typically comes from the water source. can be well water, can be tap water. there is equipment out there which can measure the level of oxygen in the water, but to buy it, it's really expensive and i am not sure if a water sample can be taken to anyone for testing. but essentially, your fish's reaction strongly suggests that there is a real issue present.

i mean the following with the best intentions to you and absolutely no offence. it would be wise that you do not keep fish until the matter is sorted. any fish you introduce into this environment will suffer the same fate :( goldfish, koi and tropicals can be affected, i am not sure for salt water fish.

i am sorry for your loss, i hope that you are able to overcome this issue and continue keeping healthy stock.

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Very sorry for your loss.

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Helen, I can appreciate that. Although, it was partially my fualt. Supposedly all you have to do is keep the hose outside the water and the gases are transpersed into the air. I was wicked busy and could not find a good spot to perch it while I busied myself with the kids. I haven't had this issue though in a long time, I thought it cleared itself, sometimes the hose slipped and no adverse reactions. I was able to porch it the second time on my filter that I had just cleaned. My bottom sitting two are now swimming. Hard lesson learned.

Edited by Smurfishy

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so sorry for your loss :(

But greatful for your info ...

as I will be having well water here in florida and it will all be new to me ;)

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Helen, I can appreciate that. Although, it was partially my fualt. Supposedly all you have to do is keep the hose outside the water and the gases are transpersed into the air. I was wicked busy and could not find a good spot to perch it while I busied myself with the kids. I haven't had this issue though in a long time, I thought it cleared itself, sometimes the hose slipped and no adverse reactions. I was able to porch it the second time on my filter that I had just cleaned. My bottom sitting two are now swimming. Hard lesson learned.

I'm very sorry for your loss. :hug

Are you saying this same thing happened once before when the hose went underwater? I have not heard of this before ... my Python goes under the surface of the water to fill the tank all the time, and I have never seen any such problems in my fish or heard of this as a cause of gas bubble disease (not that I know much about gas bubble disease to begin with).

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Do you have a well Amanda? It's prevalent in deep wells or when rapidly heating or cooling well water, or if the seal in the pump of your well has a leak that can introduce air. According to everything I read you keep the hose out of the water and your good. This had happened to me a once or twice before but not in a year or two. I also have a high nitrite level which causes my tanks nitrates to sky rocket.

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Do you have a well Amanda? It's prevalent in deep wells or when rapidly heating or cooling well water, or if the seal in the pump of your well has a leak that can introduce air. According to everything I read you keep the hose out of the water and your good. This had happened to me a once or twice before but not in a year or two. I also have a high nitrite level which causes my tanks nitrates to sky rocket.

Oh, OK - no, I don't have a well; I am on city water. The water here is always 0/0/0 for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. I'm very sorry this happened to you again.

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Do you have a well Amanda? It's prevalent in deep wells or when rapidly heating or cooling well water, or if the seal in the pump of your well has a leak that can introduce air. According to everything I read you keep the hose out of the water and your good. This had happened to me a once or twice before but not in a year or two. I also have a high nitrite level which causes my tanks nitrates to sky rocket.

This can happen on city water too. I know goldiegeek struggles with super saturated gasses and I think she's on city water. I'm on city water and get it from time to time as well. My solution is that every time I fill up the tank I have the hose pointing upwards so that the agitation of having the water cascade down will allow the supersaturated gases to escape. I think goldiegeek allows her water to age, which is apparently just as effective.

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Are the bubbles on tank walls after water changes a huge risk, even if they're only there for a little while after?

Should I be using something to disrupt them? :yikes

I'll keep in mind not to submerge the pump hose during refilling. :scared

Edited by Chai

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Are the bubbles on tank walls after water changes a huge risk, even if they're only there for a little while after?

Should I be using something to disrupt them? :yikes

I'll keep in mind not to submerge the pump hose during refilling. :scared

Honestly, what I know about this I learned from a post GoldieGeek made about some fry that were dying off, so I don't know that much. She mentioned that she had these super saturated gasses and that one of the signs was millions of tiny bubbles coating every surface after you fill up your tank. I don't know if this is the only sign, or if it can also be caused by other things. She mentioned agitation and ageing as the two methods to get rid of them. Since I see the tiny bubbles from time to time I always make sure to agitate my water. Someone else might have some more answers.

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Are the bubbles on tank walls after water changes a huge risk, even if they're only there for a little while after?

Should I be using something to disrupt them? :yikes

I'll keep in mind not to submerge the pump hose during refilling. :scared

Honestly, what I know about this I learned from a post GoldieGeek made about some fry that were dying off, so I don't know that much. She mentioned that she had these super saturated gasses and that one of the signs was millions of tiny bubbles coating every surface after you fill up your tank. I don't know if this is the only sign, or if it can also be caused by other things. She mentioned agitation and ageing as the two methods to get rid of them. Since I see the tiny bubbles from time to time I always make sure to agitate my water. Someone else might have some more answers.
This is so interesting. I had no idea this was even a problem. I've heard of gas bubble disease, but didn't know it was related to bubbles getting into your tank. I have seen bubbles on my fishes' fins after a water change, but they always go away quickly and I have never seen any strange behavior resulting from it. Until today, I had never heard that you should not allow the Python to hang below the surface of the water as it is filling the tank, and I have always done this! At what point/how does it become a problem? Does it have to do with the water chemistry?

Edit: I just looked it up in Fancy Goldfish by Johnson & Hess and found nothing. :(

Edited by *Amanda*

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Are the bubbles on tank walls after water changes a huge risk, even if they're only there for a little while after?

Should I be using something to disrupt them? :yikes

I'll keep in mind not to submerge the pump hose during refilling. :scared

Honestly, what I know about this I learned from a post GoldieGeek made about some fry that were dying off, so I don't know that much. She mentioned that she had these super saturated gasses and that one of the signs was millions of tiny bubbles coating every surface after you fill up your tank. I don't know if this is the only sign, or if it can also be caused by other things. She mentioned agitation and ageing as the two methods to get rid of them. Since I see the tiny bubbles from time to time I always make sure to agitate my water. Someone else might have some more answers.
This is so interesting. I had no idea this was even a problem. I've heard of gas bubble disease, but didn't know it was related to bubbles getting into your tank. I have seen bubbles on my fishes' fins after a water change, but they always go away quickly and I have never seen any strange behavior resulting from it. Until today, I had never heard that you should not allow the Python to hang below the surface of the water as it is filling the tank, and I have always done this! At what point/how does it become a problem? Does it have to do with the water chemistry?

Edit: I just looked it up in Fancy Goldfish by Johnson & Hess and found nothing. :(

I'm a little unclear on those points. I plan on doing some research into the matter later today when I have some time.

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