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Well water?


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  • Regular Member

So in about a month and a half I'm going to be moving to a different state, and at my new home I am going to have well water. I was wondering if I still need to add dechlorinator or anything else to the water to make it safe for my fishies? And is it going to be more difficult to acclimate them to the new water?

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Because it is a well, you'll have to test it before using it to see if there is anything poor for the fish. Also, if you can get a Water Quality Report from the last time the well was tested by the county, you should take a look at it.

My fish thrive on well water due to what I believe to be the higher mineral content. They really seem to perk up compared to city water.

I always add Prime whether I am on well or city water, because it does more than dechlorinate the water.

The difficulty acclimating lies with the parameters, as any move would.

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  • Regular Member

Because it is a well, you'll have to test it before using it to see if there is anything poor for the fish. Also, if you can get a Water Quality Report from the last time the well was tested by the county, you should take a look at it.

My fish thrive on well water due to what I believe to be the higher mineral content. They really seem to perk up compared to city water.

I always add Prime whether I am on well or city water, because it does more than dechlorinate the water.

The difficulty acclimating lies with the parameters, as any move would.

What exactly should I test the water for?
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  • Regular Member

Because it is a well, you'll have to test it before using it to see if there is anything poor for the fish. Also, if you can get a Water Quality Report from the last time the well was tested by the county, you should take a look at it.

My fish thrive on well water due to what I believe to be the higher mineral content. They really seem to perk up compared to city water.

I always add Prime whether I am on well or city water, because it does more than dechlorinate the water.

The difficulty acclimating lies with the parameters, as any move would.

What exactly should I test the water for?

Your API Freshwater Master kit parameters, to start. You need to acclimate if there are any differences. You will need to test both your source that runs through the softener and the one that doesn't, to test for PH issues. Sometimes wells carry ammonia, too, or nitrite or nitrate.

The reason I say to get your well's latest report is because it will tell you if there's a high quantity of sulfur or anything else in the well which could pose an issue.

Edited by ChelseaM
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  • Regular Member

Because it is a well, you'll have to test it before using it to see if there is anything poor for the fish. Also, if you can get a Water Quality Report from the last time the well was tested by the county, you should take a look at it.

My fish thrive on well water due to what I believe to be the higher mineral content. They really seem to perk up compared to city water.

I always add Prime whether I am on well or city water, because it does more than dechlorinate the water.

The difficulty acclimating lies with the parameters, as any move would.

What exactly should I test the water for?

Your API Freshwater Master kit parameters, to start. You need to acclimate if there are any differences. You will need to test both your source that runs through the softener and the one that doesn't, to test for PH issues. Sometimes wells carry ammonia, too, or nitrite or nitrate.
Ok, I'll be sure to do that. Thanks! :D
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I also have well water, and I use Prime. I don't officially have to, but I feel like it's a safety net, *just in case*, you know?

If you're moving, make sure that your new place has a kH/gH test kit, as well.

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Because it is a well, you'll have to test it before using it to see if there is anything poor for the fish. Also, if you can get a Water Quality Report from the last time the well was tested by the county, you should take a look at it.

My fish thrive on well water due to what I believe to be the higher mineral content. They really seem to perk up compared to city water.

I always add Prime whether I am on well or city water, because it does more than dechlorinate the water.

The difficulty acclimating lies with the parameters, as any move would.

What exactly should I test the water for?

Your API Freshwater Master kit parameters, to start. You need to acclimate if there are any differences. You will need to test both your source that runs through the softener and the one that doesn't, to test for PH issues. Sometimes wells carry ammonia, too, or nitrite or nitrate.

The reason I say to get your well's latest report is because it will tell you if there's a high quantity of sulfur or anything else in the well which could pose an issue.

I was talking to my dad about the well water and he said he thinks there is some sulphur in the water. Is sulphur bad for fish? Is there a certain amount of sulphur they can tolerate?
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They can tolerate sulphur alright, but I would get specific numbers for everything to be sure you aren't going to have PH issues and don't have to 'gass off' your water due to any other factors.

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I would never consider keeping a fish in the water from my dad's old well. It literally reeked of sulfur and had enough iron in it to supplement my diet so that I didn't need iron pills for my deficiency. And it was full of lime. A lot of the time we wouldn't even shower in it, and preferred to go to the lake up the road instead.

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Wow, a lot of people here seem to have wells! The only people I know in my area who have wells are people living way up in the Santa Cruz Mountains; everyone else is on city water. Maybe they're more common in other parts of the U.S.? Very interesting; I'm going to go look into this now. [emoji4]

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