Jump to content

Switching from EI to PPS-Pro


marka83

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

I have been wondering about something. In all my tanks, it is 0 nitrates, all the time. Two of my current tanks have no plants and the third has just a couple of anacharis. I am planning to set up a low-tech planted tank (50 gal, 21" deep) with anubias and other low-light plants, CaribSea Super Naturals Moonlight sand, dosing of root tabs and Flourish, and the Marineland Double Light 36" LED. I do a 95% WC weekly, but even when I was changing just 40-50% I had 0 nitrates.

I have read that aquatic plants use more ammonia than nitrate, as opposed to terrestrial plants that predominately use nitrate, but that both are still important. In your opinion, would my continual lack of nitrate be problematic for my plants?

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I have been wondering about something. In all my tanks, it is 0 nitrates, all the time. Two of my current tanks have no plants and the third has just a couple of anacharis. I am planning to set up a low-tech planted tank (50 gal, 21" deep) with anubias and other low-light plants, CaribSea Super Naturals Moonlight sand, dosing of root tabs and Flourish, and the Marineland Double Light 36" LED. I do a 95% WC weekly, but even when I was changing just 40-50% I had 0 nitrates.

I have read that aquatic plants use more ammonia than nitrate, as opposed to terrestrial plants that predominately use nitrate, but that both are still important. In your opinion, would my continual lack of nitrate be problematic for my plants?

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Amanda, Can you remind us, what type of test kit are you using, how big are your current tanks, and number of fish per tank?

When the number of plants in my tank got to a certain population, I noticed problems with the anubias. That is why I started dosing with dry fertilizers, including nitrogen (KNO3). The nitrate levels are now 10-20 ppm. Phosphorus is 1-2 ppm. The anubias problem has stopped and they are doing quite well. Previously the nitrate levels in my tank were around 5ppm. You can read about my adventure in the pinned thread "Dry Fertilizers from Green Leaf Aquariums." Everything I've read so far indicates that a nitrate level of 10-30ppm is ideal for aquatic plants. Mark seems to know a lot about aquatic plants, so I'm sure he will contribute his thoughts.

Edited by LisaCGold
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I have been wondering about something. In all my tanks, it is 0 nitrates, all the time. Two of my current tanks have no plants and the third has just a couple of anacharis. I am planning to set up a low-tech planted tank (50 gal, 21" deep) with anubias and other low-light plants, CaribSea Super Naturals Moonlight sand, dosing of root tabs and Flourish, and the Marineland Double Light 36" LED. I do a 95% WC weekly, but even when I was changing just 40-50% I had 0 nitrates.

I have read that aquatic plants use more ammonia than nitrate, as opposed to terrestrial plants that predominately use nitrate, but that both are still important. In your opinion, would my continual lack of nitrate be problematic for my plants?

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Amanda, Can you remind us, what type of test kit are you using, how big are your current tanks, and number of fish per tank?

When the number of plants in my tank got to a certain population, I noticed problems with the anubias. That is why I started dosing with dry fertilizers, including nitrogen (KNO3). The nitrate levels are now 10-20 ppm. Phosphorus is 1-2 ppm. The anubias problem has stopped and they are doing quite well. Previously the nitrate levels in my tank were around 5ppm. You can read about my adventure in the pinned thread "Dry Fertilizers from Green Leaf Aquariums." Everything I've read so far indicates that a nitrate level of 10-30ppm is ideal for aquatic plants. Mark seems to know a lot about aquatic plants, so I'm sure he will contribute his thoughts.

I use the API drops. Although my fish are still small (2-3.5"), my tanks are fully stocked: 5 in the 55 gal and 3 in the 36 gal. (The 20 gal is just housing a rubbernose pleco.)

I'm just worried that my lack of nitrates will limit my ability to keep aquatic plants. The only time I've ever seen nitrate in my tanks was at the end of the cycling process and when I was doing 15% water changes weekly - back then I was paranoid about changing too much water at once, LOL. Many sites do advocate the less-water-is-more philosophy even for goldfish ... imagine my shock when I came here and heard of people changing 100%! And further shock when I found out for myself that big water changes actually work much better! :-)

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I honestly wouldn't worry about a lack of nitrates in a low light tank. You can reassess as you get going, if you start to see deficiencies etc., but when I was keeping a lower light/low tech tank with just anubias I did not have any issues, and I did not use any ferts. I usually had a 0, maybe 5ppm nitrate reading at water change time and it was never an issue. (I was changing water every 4-5 days at the time with an 80% change, I currently do weekly 80% water changes)

The higher your light is, the higher demand is going to be for nutrients such as nitrate. Keeping lighting on the lower end and keeping plants that are not needy in terms of light/nutrients is going to diminish the need for adding ferts.

But ultimately, it is all trial and error. Get your tank set up like you want it, allow the plants to acclimate and then go from there. If you begin seeing nutrient deficiencies then it is time to re-evaluate what your plants might need ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

But ultimately, it is all trial and error. Get your tank set up like you want it, allow the plants to acclimate and then go from there. If you begin seeing nutrient deficiencies then it is time to re-evaluate what your plants might need ;)

This. The thing I've learnt from trial and error, well, in a high light tank, is that it tends not to be lack of fertilisers that are the cause deficiency anyway. Most of the time it's inadequate distribution of carbon dioxide.

Edited by dan in aus
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I agree with all this advice. Luckily plants aren't crazy expensive when replacing just one if two lost from trail and error. Depending on your holistic setup your needs for certain nutrients will change. I've been changing lighting and co2 levels in my tank because I have algae issues popping up and my growth is were I want it. So I want to slow things down. But in the process I lost all my red myrio, which was the fastest growing plant in my tank. Depending on the plants you keep, they should be pretty resilient to trail and error. I have a few different types of crypts, Amazon swords, and anubias coffeeolia. They all took the change well...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I call this part of my tank the jungle... I am going to change my filter setup because the out flow of water from the hob pushes my swords forward and they are completely shading others... my shubunkin likes to disappear down in there and hunt.

IMG_0173_zps1fedb94b.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'd be worried that I couldn't keep the spots in between the plants clean enough. :rofl3

He's probably in heaven. :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...