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Cutaneous Mycobactariosis


LouiseAnn

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All aquatic biofilms include mycobacteria, and virtually every goldfish is "infected" with mycobacteria. It's just like Staph aureus is abundant on your skin, and probably some of those bugs are methicillin resistant, yet you probably don't have a serious staph infection, let alone a MRSA infection.

But it appears that mycobacteria sometimes mutates to a virulent form that makes fish sick and is often fatal. When a fish dies from a virulent mycobacteria infection, it releases a lot of virulent bugs into the water, resulting in more sick fish. The disease is incurable in fish. These bacteria are highly resistant to antibiotics. Cutaneous mycobacteriosis -- or fish keepers granuloma -- can come from contact with mycobacteria in healthy tanks/ponds as well as sick ones or can be picked up from swimming pools that are not maintained well. It usually occurs on the hands and arms unless one wades or swims in the pond.

Anyone who has skin lesions that won't go away and doesn't have a diagnosis yet should tell the physician that they keep fish. Human mycobacteriosis is rare enough that physicians may not look for it.

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So it is probably in most aquariums? If antibiotics dont work will my uv work?

Im a bit confused.

Everyone in my house is healthy.... So can i only catch it if i have a cut?

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So it is probably in most aquariums? If antibiotics dont work will my uv work?

Im a bit confused.

Everyone in my house is healthy.... So can i only catch it if i have a cut?

It depends on the UV, firstly, but for something that resides mainly IN/ON the fish, there isn't much any sterilizer could do.

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I can, and I did! Thank you! :)

It's so strange that they decided to call it cutaneous, but I do understand what they mean now.

MTb is rather prevalent aqua hobby, so I don't think it's anything you can do to eradicate it. Certainly, you can't treat it, at least at the hobby level.

MTb is the same is Tb in humans. There are a variety of factors which influence how a fish may or may not because susceptible to the disease, unfortunately. The UV may help, but what's clear is that you should avoid that seller -- permanently.

I'm glad you got an answer to this huge problem. :)

Is there anything else I can do for my fish? Or do I just enjoy them until they are all gone and start fresh?

What about my health. Would you recommend getting rid of them completely?

:(

i suggest getting pond gloves to do waterchanges if you have concern for your health.. and for anyone else who does also.

This is the only recent documentation I could find about piscine mycobacteriosis.

https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/getFactSheet/whichfactsheet/231/

If you or anyone develops large red bumps on the body after being in contact with the fish, seek medical attention ASAP.

I have to ask do you meen big red sore bumbs like this?

ysy4u8eh.jpg

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daniel, that is terrible. do you know what the background is of those blemishes?

No they are not bug bites though. They are related to the extreme leg pain ive been having. The doctor is doing blood test and will go from there.

Ps sorry to hijack the thread.

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Its so very ok! I hope you figure out whats happening soon. Sounds terrible. My best wishes for you.

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So it is probably in most aquariums? If antibiotics dont work will my uv work?

Im a bit confused.

Everyone in my house is healthy.... So can i only catch it if i have a cut?

It depends on the UV, firstly, but for something that resides mainly IN/ON the fish, there isn't much any sterilizer could do.

Oh ok.

Alex. So is it no more dangerous than gardening for a seemingly healthy person?

.Now im afraid of my tank.

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There is absolutely no reason to be afraid! :hug

In all that time, WITH fish confirmed to have mycobacteria, you did not develop granulomas on your arms where you come into contact with the water, nor did you have any mysterious ailments. So, I wouldn't worry about it.

You are fine, but if you worry, wear gloves. :)

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There is absolutely no reason to be afraid! :hug

In all that time, WITH fish confirmed to have mycobacteria, you did not develop granulomas on your arms where you come into contact with the water, nor did you have any mysterious ailments. So, I wouldn't worry about it.

You are fine, but if you worry, wear gloves. :)

Haha good point. Argh im so sad.... poor Tiger never had a chance. Guess that meand it was only a matter of time for boofa and orca too. (From the infected lfs)

But my other fish had nothing wrong. Oh I feel so bad for them! I don't want them all to die of this :(

Im never getting any more fish for this tank.

[emoji27][emoji24]

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I have to admit, that as a medical doctor, I myself would be pretty cautious with fish that have confirmed mycobacterium, especially where there have been deaths in the tank. Although transmission to humans isn't common, when it happens it requires prolonged treatment for several months with very strong antibiotics, and can be difficult to eradicate completely, requiring even longer treatment. At the very least I would use gloves, and keep an eye out for breaks in your skin. And I would add no new fish to the tank so that when they have all died you can start afresh.

Yes im sure and yhe doctor agrees. Its not the only symptom I have aswell. Im also lossing blood though my bowls, have have joint pain, swollen limpnodes, cant eat, loss of appetite, fever, night sweets.

Daniel, I'm not sure how the referral process works in the US, but if your primary care doctor hasn't referred you to a gastroenetrologist yet, please make sure they do. From what you've posted this should not be difficult to diagnose, but you will need a colonoscopy, as soon as possible. Good luck getting a speedy diagnosis.

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I have to admit, that as a medical doctor, I myself would be pretty cautious with fish that have confirmed mycobacterium, especially where there have been deaths in the tank. Although transmission to humans isn't common, when it happens it requires prolonged treatment for several months with very strong antibiotics, and can be difficult to eradicate completely, requiring even longer treatment. At the very least I would use gloves, and keep an eye out for breaks in your skin. And I would add no new fish to the tank so that when they have all died you can start afresh.

Yes im sure and yhe doctor agrees. Its not the only symptom I have aswell. Im also lossing blood though my bowls, have have joint pain, swollen limpnodes, cant eat, loss of appetite, fever, night sweets.

Daniel, I'm not sure how the referral process works in the US, but if your primary care doctor hasn't referred you to a gastroenetrologist yet, please make sure they do. From what you've posted this should not be difficult to diagnose, but you will need a colonoscopy, as soon as possible. Good luck getting a speedy diagnosis.

Oh dear. Ok gloves it is. O_o now im scared of my tank again :(

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Still a bit lost. Not sure what to do with my tank :(

Nothing. Continue as you are.

Wear gloves if you worry (not a concern in my mind, but do take care not to expose cuts and such on your arms to tank water.

That's it. :)

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