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Caribsea -- Sunset Gold

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So, in efforts to change up my tank as well as them being a little healthier I'm going to switch from gravel to sand. My progold and hikari are almost the same color as some of the gravel that's currently in the tank (brown) ...

My question is how many twenty pound bags would I need to fill my 55 and my 80?

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Will you be planting in it? If not, here are the following measurements. It is recommended to keep sand at 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thick if not planting in it.

I'll be using a substrate calculator, which are found all over the internet. :)

Non-planted:

55g: 48x13x21in. at a depth of 0.25 inches - 9lbs

80g: 48x18x21in at a depth of 0.25 inches - 12lbs

Note that I used the dimensions for a 75g tank, as I can't find the dimensions of a standard 80 gallon tank.

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Just a warning on sand. It is practically impossible to actually clean it, and you may find your goldfish ingest it. I removed mine because of this.

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Carole, theoretically ingesting sand poses no harm to a goldfish. Why does it concern you that they do?

Edited by ChelseaM

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Just a warning on sand. It is practically impossible to actually clean it, and you may find your goldfish ingest it. I removed mine because of this.

There is no proof that sand is consitently a health hazard to fish.

Gravel collects a lot of waste that can be tough to clean.

Also, I have read many stories of fish choking on gravel.

Also, sand is a natural environment for goldfish.

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I loved sand! Prefer the heavier Caribsea Tahitian Moon sand. Only reason I don't use it now is it was hard on my filters, my 40G breeder is only 16" high, so no matter how high I put intakes, sand was kicked up.... But the goldfish love it, keeps them very busy, and ingesting it was actually great for keeping their digestive tracks cleaned out! Hardly any floating/gulping when I had sand!
Keeping a 1/4 to 1/2 inch is no problem to keep clean, nothing sinks into sand, so filter whisk everything away as easily as bare bottom!

Edited by Red

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Why? :o That is an absolute ton of sand!

I'm on the line now trying to see if I can get 3 bags instead.

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Why? :o That is an absolute ton of sand!

I'm on the line now trying to see if I can get 3 bags instead.

:thumbup2: Sounds like a good idea. Otherwise you will have a lot left over. :o

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Why? :o That is an absolute ton of sand!

I'm on the line now trying to see if I can get 3 bags instead.

I used one 20lb on my 55, but no plants.

Hope it works out for you :)

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Why? :o That is an absolute ton of sand!

I'm on the line now trying to see if I can get 3 bags instead.

:thumbup2: Sounds like a good idea. Otherwise you will have a lot left over. :o

Why? :o That is an absolute ton of sand!

I'm on the line now trying to see if I can get 3 bags instead.

I used one 20lb on my 55, but no plants.

Hope it works out for you :)

Thanks guys... Seems like I'll be on hold forever. I already have to wait two weeks for it .. Ugh. Might just donate some to someone who needs it.

Can anyone direct me to where I can find the alternative set up for the AQ 110? Gonna work on that in the meantime. :(

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Show some picture's when it is finished.

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Show some picture's when it is finished.

Of course. If I ever get the tank fixed.

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Show some picture's when it is finished.

Of course. If I ever get the tank fixed.

I hope everything works out for you with your tank.

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Will you be planting in it? If not, here are the following measurements. It is recommended to keep sand at 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thick if not planting in it.

I'll be using a substrate calculator, which are found all over the internet. :)

Non-planted:

55g: 48x13x21in. at a depth of 0.25 inches - 9lbs

80g: 48x18x21in at a depth of 0.25 inches - 12lbs

Note that I used the dimensions for a 75g tank, as I can't find the dimensions of a standard 80 gallon tank.

That's incredibly helpful, Chelsea. I have always just guessed ... and usually end up buying WAY too much! I recently removed a ton of gravel from each of my tanks, which had previously contained at least 5 in of gravel. I had put 2 huge bags in my 36 gal based on the pet store employee's recommendation that it be "nice and deep"! My gravel is about 1.5 in now and much easier to keep clean.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

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Carole, theoretically ingesting sand poses no harm to a goldfish. Why does it concern you that they do?

My concern was seeing them poop out black sand poop. All they were trying to do was eat. My other concern is impaction.

Just a warning on sand. It is practically impossible to actually clean it, and you may find your goldfish ingest it. I removed mine because of this.

There is no proof that sand is consitently a health hazard to fish.

Gravel collects a lot of waste that can be tough to clean.

Also, I have read many stories of fish choking on gravel.

Also, sand is a natural environment for goldfish.

Keeping fish in an aquarium is not a natural environment. There are no benthic organisms in that sand in our tanks to work out the detritus and keep it healthy. So even if your tank water is clean, the sand is not. So you have fish swimming over a dirty bottom. It creates higher nitrates.

Nope, gravel is not either. So that is why I have eliminated substrate. I have some marbles, but they easy to push around and clean the entire bottom.

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Will you be planting in it? If not, here are the following measurements. It is recommended to keep sand at 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thick if not planting in it.

I'll be using a substrate calculator, which are found all over the internet. :)

Non-planted:

55g: 48x13x21in. at a depth of 0.25 inches - 9lbs

80g: 48x18x21in at a depth of 0.25 inches - 12lbs

Note that I used the dimensions for a 75g tank, as I can't find the dimensions of a standard 80 gallon tank.

That's incredibly helpful, Chelsea. I have always just guessed ... and usually end up buying WAY too much! I recently removed a ton of gravel from each of my tanks, which had previously contained at least 5 in of gravel. I had put 2 huge bags in my 36 gal based on the pet store employee's recommendation that it be "nice and deep"! My gravel is about 1.5 in now and much easier to keep clean.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Pfft. Pet store employees. Useless in a lot of instances. :rofl

I haven't bought substrate in almost a year, but plan on doing it soon, so I was searching for a good calculator and found one that does sand, planting substrates, dirt, etc. and got these from there. I don't remember if it has a gravel option or not. I personally wouldn't use gravel in an aquarium, but a calculator for it would be nice if I ever wanted to use it in a bog filter or something. :)

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Will you be planting in it? If not, here are the following measurements. It is recommended to keep sand at 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thick if not planting in it.

I'll be using a substrate calculator, which are found all over the internet. :)

Non-planted:

55g: 48x13x21in. at a depth of 0.25 inches - 9lbs

80g: 48x18x21in at a depth of 0.25 inches - 12lbs

Note that I used the dimensions for a 75g tank, as I can't find the dimensions of a standard 80 gallon tank.

That's incredibly helpful, Chelsea. I have always just guessed ... and usually end up buying WAY too much! I recently removed a ton of gravel from each of my tanks, which had previously contained at least 5 in of gravel. I had put 2 huge bags in my 36 gal based on the pet store employee's recommendation that it be "nice and deep"! My gravel is about 1.5 in now and much easier to keep clean.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Pfft. Pet store employees. Useless in a lot of instances. :rofl

I haven't bought substrate in almost a year, but plan on doing it soon, so I was searching for a good calculator and found one that does sand, planting substrates, dirt, etc. and got these from there. I don't remember if it has a gravel option or not. I personally wouldn't use gravel in an aquarium, but a calculator for it would be nice if I ever wanted to use it in a bog filter or something. :)

I've always had gravel (since when I was starting out, the same pet store employees told me that was the only option for goldfish ... lol), but am looking into either sand or a dirted tank with Activ-Flora Lake Gems as a cap for my new 50 gal. I'm trying to decide whether I want a TON of plants or not (which would be necessary if I go with the latter option). It's a tough decision and I can't make up my mind!

Speaking of calculators, it would be great if they had one for plants so that you could know, for example, how many plants to buy if you want 75% of the tank floor covered.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

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Carole, theoretically ingesting sand poses no harm to a goldfish. Why does it concern you that they do?

My concern was seeing them poop out black sand poop. All they were trying to do was eat. My other concern is impaction.

Just a warning on sand. It is practically impossible to actually clean it, and you may find your goldfish ingest it. I removed mine because of this.

There is no proof that sand is consitently a health hazard to fish.

Gravel collects a lot of waste that can be tough to clean.

Also, I have read many stories of fish choking on gravel.

Also, sand is a natural environment for goldfish.

Keeping fish in an aquarium is not a natural environment. There are no benthic organisms in that sand in our tanks to work out the detritus and keep it healthy. So even if your tank water is clean, the sand is not. So you have fish swimming over a dirty bottom. It creates higher nitrates.

Nope, gravel is not either. So that is why I have eliminated substrate. I have some marbles, but they easy to push around and clean the entire bottom.

I can understand that, but I have not seen an instance of it myself. Ingesting sand is actually seen as beneficial for digestion, but that is more seen in wild carp, and fancies have a very different digestive tract in terms of shape. However, I wouldn't worry about it that much if you are feeding the fish the right stuff to keep their bowels moving properly.

Goldfish do not have a natural environment. We base their environment on the environment of the carp. However, an aquarium mimics a natural environment to the best of our abilities to do so. Sand is found on the river bottoms that carp feed on. Those river bottoms are swimming with bacteria and heavy with detritus. In the wild, there are tons of bacteria that are there to break down the detritus. In an aquarium, however, we use the gravel vac to remove it instead. Beneficial bacteria live in the substrate to do some of the work, but you are correct in saying there aren't many. However, sand can be cleaned and disinfected easily. Boil, bake, done. Then you just need to make sure it isn't too thick so you can vacuum any bits that feed the bacteria out easily. Always, always be thorough.

I am with Mike in the belief that we can not blame sand for issues that happen in the aquarium without just cause. Sure, something can live in the sand and cause a problem, but with careful attention that is highly unlikely to happen. If it does, like in your case, it can be devastating. But that is not a reason to forego substrate all together. I honestly believe that my fish, after not having substrate for prolonged amounts of time, have lowered immune systems. They're never exposed to the stuff that sometimes builds up, and then when I try substrate in my tanks I wind up with a disease issue no matter what substrate it is. Now, I haven't been able to prove that this is the issue yet, so I cannot say this is fact, but I can say that once you go barebottom, there are plenty of reasons not to go back. It doesn't mean that it is a good idea to demonize all substrates because of this, though. I apologize if you take this poorly, but these are my views on the situation.

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Will you be planting in it? If not, here are the following measurements. It is recommended to keep sand at 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thick if not planting in it.

I'll be using a substrate calculator, which are found all over the internet. :)

Non-planted:

55g: 48x13x21in. at a depth of 0.25 inches - 9lbs

80g: 48x18x21in at a depth of 0.25 inches - 12lbs

Note that I used the dimensions for a 75g tank, as I can't find the dimensions of a standard 80 gallon tank.

That's incredibly helpful, Chelsea. I have always just guessed ... and usually end up buying WAY too much! I recently removed a ton of gravel from each of my tanks, which had previously contained at least 5 in of gravel. I had put 2 huge bags in my 36 gal based on the pet store employee's recommendation that it be "nice and deep"! My gravel is about 1.5 in now and much easier to keep clean.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Pfft. Pet store employees. Useless in a lot of instances. :rofl

I haven't bought substrate in almost a year, but plan on doing it soon, so I was searching for a good calculator and found one that does sand, planting substrates, dirt, etc. and got these from there. I don't remember if it has a gravel option or not. I personally wouldn't use gravel in an aquarium, but a calculator for it would be nice if I ever wanted to use it in a bog filter or something. :)

I've always had gravel (since when I was starting out, the same pet store employees told me that was the only option for goldfish ... lol), but am looking into either sand or a dirted tank with Activ-Flora Lake Gems as a cap for my new 50 gal. I'm trying to decide whether I want a TON of plants or not (which would be necessary if I go with the latter option). It's a tough decision and I can't make up my mind!

Speaking of calculators, it would be great if they had one for plants so that you could know, for example, how many plants to buy if you want 75% of the tank floor covered.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I think that a calculator like that would have too many factors attached. But it would be awesome if it were available!

What would be living in the tank? I would do one or two massive plants with goldfish so that you don't waste a ton of money, but with tropicals a jungle is a fun option!

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Will you be planting in it? If not, here are the following measurements. It is recommended to keep sand at 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch thick if not planting in it.

I'll be using a substrate calculator, which are found all over the internet. :)

Non-planted:

55g: 48x13x21in. at a depth of 0.25 inches - 9lbs

80g: 48x18x21in at a depth of 0.25 inches - 12lbs

Note that I used the dimensions for a 75g tank, as I can't find the dimensions of a standard 80 gallon tank.

That's incredibly helpful, Chelsea. I have always just guessed ... and usually end up buying WAY too much! I recently removed a ton of gravel from each of my tanks, which had previously contained at least 5 in of gravel. I had put 2 huge bags in my 36 gal based on the pet store employee's recommendation that it be "nice and deep"! My gravel is about 1.5 in now and much easier to keep clean.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Pfft. Pet store employees. Useless in a lot of instances. :rofl

I haven't bought substrate in almost a year, but plan on doing it soon, so I was searching for a good calculator and found one that does sand, planting substrates, dirt, etc. and got these from there. I don't remember if it has a gravel option or not. I personally wouldn't use gravel in an aquarium, but a calculator for it would be nice if I ever wanted to use it in a bog filter or something. :)

I've always had gravel (since when I was starting out, the same pet store employees told me that was the only option for goldfish ... lol), but am looking into either sand or a dirted tank with Activ-Flora Lake Gems as a cap for my new 50 gal. I'm trying to decide whether I want a TON of plants or not (which would be necessary if I go with the latter option). It's a tough decision and I can't make up my mind!

Speaking of calculators, it would be great if they had one for plants so that you could know, for example, how many plants to buy if you want 75% of the tank floor covered.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I think that a calculator like that would have too many factors attached. But it would be awesome if it were available!

What would be living in the tank? I would do one or two massive plants with goldfish so that you don't waste a ton of money, but with tropicals a jungle is a fun option!

I will most likely have 2 fancy GF and MAYBE 2 gold dojo loaches later on (still researching their needs). My concern with only having a couple of plants is algae ... or is that not a real issue without the extra nutrients from the dirt? I definitely want substrate, just not gravel - although bare bottom tanks can look cool with driftwood and plants, my fish enjoy digging around in the substrate so much and I enjoy watching them do it (plus what you said about immunity makes sense - same as how some germophobic people can get sicker than other people when they are exposed to pathogens due to limited immune system buildup).

The GF I've kept have never eaten plants, but with new fish, who knows. So, I would stick to the tried-and-true low-tech plants like anubias, java fern, java moss, etc. The way I see it, I could either get a dirted tank and a ton of plants, or a sanded tank with driftwood and a few plants tied to it. I might go down to the beach this weekend to see if I can find a nice piece of driftwood or any cool rocks.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

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I will most likely have 2 fancy GF and MAYBE 2 gold dojo loaches later on (still researching their needs). My concern with only having a couple of plants is algae ... or is that not a real issue without the extra nutrients from the dirt? I definitely want substrate, just not gravel - although bare bottom tanks can look cool with driftwood and plants, my fish enjoy digging around in the substrate so much and I enjoy watching them do it (plus what you said about immunity makes sense - same as how some germophobic people can get sicker than other people when they are exposed to pathogens due to limited immune system buildup).

The GF I've kept have never eaten plants, but with new fish, who knows. So, I would stick to the tried-and-true low-tech plants like anubias, java fern, java moss, etc. The way I see it, I could either get a dirted tank and a ton of plants, or a sanded tank with driftwood and a few plants tied to it. I might go down to the beach this weekend to see if I can find a nice piece of driftwood or any cool rocks.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I would stay away from keeping loaches with goldfish. If they get a taste for your fish's slime coat, then you could have a problem on your hands. Things like that are why I like to try and keep goldfish only with goldfish, and it may be coincidental but I have seen a lot of those types of injuries lately while browsing forums. But that is my personal preference based on others' experiences.

I think a natural beach-themed tank would look gorgeous, especially if you added something like onion plant or some grass-like plant to mimic the sawgrass on the beach. :heart

My theory with the large plants is that they would be the ones taking in all the nutrients. Since they are large, they would need quite a bit of nutrition to survive. Also, with goldies, you never know what they will eat. Even the tried-and-true anubias became a snack in my tank when Clementine was around. I would say go with what you like and do some experimenting to get it how you want it.

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Firstly, I would just like to share with experience with how much substrate I used, and that is usually about 40-50% of the tank volume in pounds of sand. So, a 55 gallon tank would require about 20-25 pounds of sand, which would make this about a 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch layer.

I won't comment on substrate or no substrate in this thread, because this has been gone over ad nauseum. Perhaps what is most telling is that there seems to be large choruses on both sides, which to me, at least indicates that both options seem to work quite well, however you choose. :)

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I will most likely have 2 fancy GF and MAYBE 2 gold dojo loaches later on (still researching their needs). My concern with only having a couple of plants is algae ... or is that not a real issue without the extra nutrients from the dirt? I definitely want substrate, just not gravel - although bare bottom tanks can look cool with driftwood and plants, my fish enjoy digging around in the substrate so much and I enjoy watching them do it (plus what you said about immunity makes sense - same as how some germophobic people can get sicker than other people when they are exposed to pathogens due to limited immune system buildup).

The GF I've kept have never eaten plants, but with new fish, who knows. So, I would stick to the tried-and-true low-tech plants like anubias, java fern, java moss, etc. The way I see it, I could either get a dirted tank and a ton of plants, or a sanded tank with driftwood and a few plants tied to it. I might go down to the beach this weekend to see if I can find a nice piece of driftwood or any cool rocks.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I would stay away from keeping loaches with goldfish. If they get a taste for your fish's slime coat, then you could have a problem on your hands. Things like that are why I like to try and keep goldfish only with goldfish, and it may be coincidental but I have seen a lot of those types of injuries lately while browsing forums. But that is my personal preference based on others' experiences.

I think a natural beach-themed tank would look gorgeous, especially if you added something like onion plant or some grass-like plant to mimic the sawgrass on the beach. :heart

My theory with the large plants is that they would be the ones taking in all the nutrients. Since they are large, they would need quite a bit of nutrition to survive. Also, with goldies, you never know what they will eat. Even the tried-and-true anubias became a snack in my tank when Clementine was around. I would say go with what you like and do some experimenting to get it how you want it.

Really? I thought dojo/weather loaches had been demonstrated to be safe for goldfish. They are listed on Koko's website as being a compatible fish; that's why I started looking into them. But if there have been recent reports of this particular species attacking GF then I will look into this some more. I know there are some other loach species that aren't safe, but thought the dojo loach was.

Great idea about the onion plant. My friend just gave me a bunch of rocks, including a lot of jade, so the "beach" idea sounds nice.

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