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Morgan'sMiracles

What items are entirely necessary for a happy, healthy goldfish?

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I strongly recommend buying a large Aquaclear filter or 2 smaller ones rather than the Aqueons. I have replaced all of my Aqueons with Aquaclears and am sooooooooooo much happier. They come with better media and are set up so that you don't have to rig anything. I would check Amazon and Ebay for a good deal :)

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Sounds like a setup after my own heart! Make sure the cups and pot are sealed all over with a food safe material. If possible, use glass. That way you can also choose a pretty substrate to fill with too. And I like the aqueons a lot, but the aquaclears are also very well recommended!

-on tapatalk-

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What could be used to seal th tea pot and cups? Why do they need to be sealed?

I might get the aqua clears; those are the two I'm trying to choose between.

Oh and also, would changing one bucket of water (~3gal) a day be just as effective as a 80% water change once a week?

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What could be used to seal th tea pot and cups? Why do they need to be sealed?\

If you don't seal the cups and pot, you may leech things into the tank that are toxic or can change the water chemistry. This is why people recommend doing everything 'fish safe' that you put into an aquarium. Your best bet for sealant is Epoxy Resin.

I might get the aqua clears; those are the two I'm trying to choose between.

Whatever you like best. :)

Oh and also, would changing one bucket of water (~3gal) a day be just as effective as a 80% water change once a week?

With the math of doing that, no it would not. Remember, every time you put in new water it mixes with the old water, and only dilutes a portion of the wastes you're hoping to remove. Larger WCs help get rid of more of it at a time, resulting in it taking longer to build back up.

We will have to see your water parameters when you get your test kit, then we can determine how large a WC is safe in your tank to do weekly. Who knows, you may be able to do many small WCs, but then you won't have as much room to be able to skip out on your WCs if you get busy.

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Forgive me, Chelsea, you really do a good job of answering questions, but I just have to disagree with some of your recommendations.

First, while a fishless cycle is preferable to to a fish-in cycle, a fishless cycle seeded with media from the filter of a healthy tank is much, much faster. While it is conceivable that parasites or pathogens to which the healthy fish in the source tank are immune may be transmitted to a new tank through the seeded medium, it is not likely. Only a tiny percentage of microbes are harmful, and those are typically found in/on the host. Any that are floating around are unlikely to stick to filter medium. They are more likely to be transferred by the fishkeeper or by aerosols released from other tanks during that good splashing that aerates the water.

If you don't seed your filter, nitrifiers eventually get into your tank. They come in on dust particles, aerosol droplets, hands or other things you put in the tank -- plants, ornaments, food, etc. Outdoor ponds cycle fast because they are seeded rapidly and repeatededly. Nitifiers are soil microbes, and you can't keep dirt out of a pond. If you have a very clean house, have no other tanks, wash your hands thoroughly before you do anything with the tank, "sterilize" your plants, and keep the tank well-covered, it can take a while to get even a speck of dust with nitrifiers on it into the tank.

Once they get in, nitrifiers reproduce slowly for microbes -- doubling roughly once a day. That still means that in a week, you can have 27 = 128 times as many bugs as you started with. So even if the media from the betta tank has only 1% of the nitrifiers you can easily have a finished cycle within two weeks, as opposed to the two months that is usual for unseeded fishless cycling.

I prefer small daily water changes, in fact all of my tanks/ponds use a continuous drip of fresh water into the tank and overflow of excess water out of the tank. A perfect drip in - drip out system establishes steady state concentration of each of the chemicals in the water. You can adjust the rate of inflow of new water to adjust the steady state concentration of a given substance (usually nitrate) to what you want. A daily water change produces something close to a steady state, with just a slight adjustment with each water change. At the opposite extreme is the large weekly (or whatever) water change. Assuming you have tap water with good parameters, you go from the "dirtiest" water of the week to the cleanest within a half hour, then wastes accumulate for a week.

You are absolutely right that changing 10% of the water daily does not remove as much waste per week as does one 70% change at the end of the week. You really need about a 15% daily change. But even with just the 10% daily change the water never gets as dirty as as the weekly change tank is in the days just before the water change. Missing a weekly water change is much worse than missing a daily change.

Anyone who does only small daily water changes in an aquarium will eventually see the water getting ugly. My pond water all looks crystal clear in the pond, but if I take some out in a white bucket, the water is clearly yellowish. This is from the release of pigments from plant material, the worst of which is the ever-falling live oak leaves. In an aquarium this color typically stimulates a large water change.

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That's what I was attempting to explain, the final paragraph you wrote. I shouldn't post first thing in the morning.

For fishless cycling, I just don't think that taking your time is all that much of a problem compared to potentially releasing pathogens of any sort into a tank that you wouldn't get from the air. I understand that the risk is somewhat minimal, but I also would caution against it to minimize the potential risk.

I admire the steady state system but likely if I had the opportunity I wouldn't use it myself. The weekly cleaning provides more incentive to thoroughly check my fish and pond. Again, preference.

-on tapatalk-

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