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Morgan'sMiracles

How many gallons are needed for two fancies?

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I plan on getting a thirty gallon, and I need to know if I can keep one or two Goldies in there. The breeds I'd be choosing from would be; ryukin, oranda, fantail, veiltail, or black moor. I want to make sure I do this right and my fish get the best lives possible. Thanks!

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I plan on getting a thirty gallon, and I need to know if I can keep one or two Goldies in there. The breeds I'd be choosing from would be; ryukin, oranda, fantail, veiltail, or black moor. I want to make sure I do this right and my fish get the best lives possible. Thanks!

You might be able to do 2 goldfish, but to honest, I would really only keep one.

For 2 goldfish, I would recommend a 40 gallon breeder, or a 55 gallon. Even better is a 75 gallon, where you can really show case the beauty of your fish.

You can see how big two goldfish can get in a 75 gallon by looking at tithra's video. :)

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That's a shame. There is no way my parents would let me get a tank larger than 30 gallons, they are chaffing at even that size. Ah, oh well.

If I made a bad choice and out a second fish in a thirty, how big of a wc would be necessary weekly?

EDIT: I don't plus on doing that, I am only asking to deter myself from it. If I know how much work it will be, I'll be more likely to keep myself from doing it.

Edited by Morgan'sMiracles

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It all depends on size of the fish. Small fish would probably be fine with normal maintenance. But as they get bigger you may need to up it some. Also how much you feed would come into play. I think a few people here have kept 2 in a 29 so maybe they will come by and give their experiences. :hug

Good luck with your tank and choice.

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I wouldn't chance it, if they already don't like the 30g. There may even be a time in the future where a 30g isn't enough room for one, but that could be a generous amount of time from now. I would worry not about the maintenance, but of the quality of life of your fish in regards to personal space. Fancy Goldfish can get as big as their long-bodied counterparts sometimes, so they need some good swimming space and room to turn around because of their wide bodies. When the two fish got bigger, would you be able to provide them that home? If not, just stick with one for now. They do fine alone and enjoy human company greatly. You could even get them to do tricks to keep their minds occupied. :)

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I wouldn't chance it, if they already don't like the 30g. There may even be a time in the future where a 30g isn't enough room for one, but that could be a generous amount of time from now. I would worry not about the maintenance, but of the quality of life of your fish in regards to personal space. Fancy Goldfish can get as big as their long-bodied counterparts sometimes, so they need some good swimming space and room to turn around because of their wide bodies. When the two fish got bigger, would you be able to provide them that home? If not, just stick with one for now. They do fine alone and enjoy human company greatly. You could even get them to do tricks to keep their minds occupied. :)

That's a really good point...I hadn't thought of that. How long, about, would it take for an average fancy to grow to full size? And- I know I'm getting off topic- what sorts of food do you suggest?

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I wouldn't chance it, if they already don't like the 30g. There may even be a time in the future where a 30g isn't enough room for one, but that could be a generous amount of time from now. I would worry not about the maintenance, but of the quality of life of your fish in regards to personal space. Fancy Goldfish can get as big as their long-bodied counterparts sometimes, so they need some good swimming space and room to turn around because of their wide bodies. When the two fish got bigger, would you be able to provide them that home? If not, just stick with one for now. They do fine alone and enjoy human company greatly. You could even get them to do tricks to keep their minds occupied. :)

That's a really good point...I hadn't thought of that. How long, about, would it take for an average fancy to grow to full size? And- I know I'm getting off topic- what sorts of food do you suggest?

Most fancies do their largest growth in the first 2-3 years. After that it just slows down, but never really stops. My Clementine, while she was still alive, grew to 5x her initial size in body length alone (nose to the base of tail) in about a year.

The foods we like best here as staples (that I can remember off the top of my head) are as follows: New Life Spectrum Thera+A 1mm pellets, Omega One pellets, ProGold pellets, Repashy Soilent Green Gel, Hikari Lionhead pellets

Then of course it is important to supplement the diet with things like fresh or blanched veggies, Frozen Bloodworms (a must), Frozen Brine Shrimp, Nori (sushi seaweed), algae wafers, and many more things.

I personally feed a mix of ProGold, NLS Thera+A 1mm pellets and Jumpstart. I supplement with various things, but my fish get Frozen Bloodworms every evening and I alternate between Nori and a soaked seafood flake for usual weekly supplements. The flakes aren't really recommended, but since I have a pond I can afford to feed my fish floating food on occasion. It is most recommended to feed only sinking foods to fancies to avoid swim bladder issues.

Edited by ChelseaM

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Why do you say frozen bloodworms are a must?

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I agree long term 40 breeder.

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Why do you say frozen bloodworms are a must?

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Steve Hopkins has a great article on why they are important for goldfish growth and health that is available on his website. There is also one on the worms themselves. I fully subscribe to it based on my results as well as his. These worms also make a nice laxative, which is important for fancies, as well as being a good moist food to feed.

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I wouldn't chance it, if they already don't like the 30g. There may even be a time in the future where a 30g isn't enough room for one, but that could be a generous amount of time from now. I would worry not about the maintenance, but of the quality of life of your fish in regards to personal space. Fancy Goldfish can get as big as their long-bodied counterparts sometimes, so they need some good swimming space and room to turn around because of their wide bodies. When the two fish got bigger, would you be able to provide them that home? If not, just stick with one for now. They do fine alone and enjoy human company greatly. You could even get them to do tricks to keep their minds occupied. :)

That's a really good point...I hadn't thought of that. How long, about, would it take for an average fancy to grow to full size? And- I know I'm getting off topic- what sorts of food do you suggest?

Most fancies do their largest growth in the first 2-3 years. After that it just slows down, but never really stops. My Clementine, while she was still alive, grew to 5x her initial size in body length alone (nose to the base of tail) in about a year.

The foods we like best here as staples (that I can remember off the top of my head) are as follows: New Life Spectrum Thera+A 1mm pellets, Omega One pellets, ProGold pellets, Repashy Soilent Green Gel, Hikari Lionhead pellets

Then of course it is important to supplement the diet with things like fresh or blanched veggies, Frozen Bloodworms (a must), Frozen Brine Shrimp, Nori (sushi seaweed), algae wafers, and many more things.

I personally feed a mix of ProGold, NLS Thera+A 1mm pellets and Jumpstart. I supplement with various things, but my fish get Frozen Bloodworms every evening and I alternate between Nori and a soaked seafood flake for usual weekly supplements. The flakes aren't really recommended, but since I have a pond I can afford to feed my fish floating food on occasion. It is most recommended to feed only sinking foods to fancies to avoid swim bladder issues.

So bloodworms are a must. How many of the other foods total are necessary? Like, how many different foods should I have on hand?

How big did Clementine get in her lifetime? What happened to her?

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Just read the article. Interesting.

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Most fancies do their largest growth in the first 2-3 years. After that it just slows down, but never really stops. My Clementine, while she was still alive, grew to 5x her initial size in body length alone (nose to the base of tail) in about a year.

The foods we like best here as staples (that I can remember off the top of my head) are as follows: New Life Spectrum Thera+A 1mm pellets, Omega One pellets, ProGold pellets, Repashy Soilent Green Gel, Hikari Lionhead pellets

Then of course it is important to supplement the diet with things like fresh or blanched veggies, Frozen Bloodworms (a must), Frozen Brine Shrimp, Nori (sushi seaweed), algae wafers, and many more things.

I personally feed a mix of ProGold, NLS Thera+A 1mm pellets and Jumpstart. I supplement with various things, but my fish get Frozen Bloodworms every evening and I alternate between Nori and a soaked seafood flake for usual weekly supplements. The flakes aren't really recommended, but since I have a pond I can afford to feed my fish floating food on occasion. It is most recommended to feed only sinking foods to fancies to avoid swim bladder issues.

So bloodworms are a must. How many of the other foods total are necessary? Like, how many different foods should I have on hand?

How big did Clementine get in her lifetime? What happened to her?

Your basics would be your choice of staple food, Frozen Bloodworms, and whatever other supplements you'd like. I like the Nori because as long as you keep it dry it lasts for a long time. I just use a veggie clip to put it in the tank/pond and the fish attack it once they figure out what it is. If it isn't held down by a clip, though, you'd have to soak it because otherwise it will float. The easiest other supplements to get are fresh veggies you can get at your local grocery store. :) Spinach, Kale, and Red Leaf Lettuce are the most popular.

She was over 7 inches including her tail, with her body at a little more than 5 and a half inches, I believe. She died about a month ago from an infection that killed her too quickly before I could save her.

Edited by ChelseaM

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Awwww, that sucks Chelsea. I'm sorry about clementine.

So frozen bloodworms, one or two staple foods,and veggies?

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That's your basics right there when it comes to food. Soon you'll be spoiling a fish just like the rest of us. :)

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That's a shame. There is no way my parents would let me get a tank larger than 30 gallons, they are chaffing at even that size. Ah, oh well.

If I made a bad choice and out a second fish in a thirty, how big of a wc would be necessary weekly?

EDIT: I don't plus on doing that, I am only asking to deter myself from it. If I know how much work it will be, I'll be more likely to keep myself from doing it.

Hi Morgran'sMiracles!

I completely understand the situation you're in. I currently live at home because of my working situation and my mum used to cringe at a 10 gallon. My best advice is to keep pushing and upgrade slowly. Over two years I've managed to go from a 10 gallon to a 45 with no troubles, it's just a matter of warming your parents up to the idea. Once they're attached to your goldie and how nice the tank looks, they'll be more receptive for upgrades.

Truthfully speaking, a 30 gallon could only really house one fancy. Try taking your parents with you shopping. A 40 gallon is not that much bigger than a 30. If your parents are really concerned about space, you can look into getting a tall tank rather than a breeder, but that's a last resort as goldies love the room to swim horizontally.

Hope this helps! Hang in there I feel for you! :hug

EDIT: I should probably clarify the 10 gallon was a beta tank!

Edited by Artsy Goldfish

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How about presenting it this way. A 40B isn't any longer than a 30, but it is wider so it provides more swimming and surface area for the fish, which keeps them healthier. Furthermore, Petco is having its $1 a gallon sale right now, so a 40B is only $40, which is a steal.

Yes, you can keep two fish in a 30, and you are correct that you have to compensate for the smaller volume by increasing the water changes. Increase your weekly water change by 50%. Another way you can increase the volume of per fish is to build a large-volume DIY filter like this one or this one (best picture in post #30). A 30 gallon tank with a 10 gallon filter is a 40 gallon system.

If your tank is small for your fish, I would advise you to take it easy on food. Give a modest amount of a high quality pellet. If you want to feed something else stick with vegetables rather than high protein items like bloodworms (except as a rare treat). Excess protein makes fish produce more ammonia.

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@ArtsyGoldfish My dad doesn't really have a problem with the tanks or the sizes, but my mom... I also happen to have two ten gallon tanks set up with bettas and Cory cats. She doesn't want any more tanks in my room, period. They are worried the floor will break... So until I move out, no way I'll be allowed to get a bigger tank. Thanks for the suggestion, though.

@shakaho A 40B sounds like a viable option, and maybe when I have my thirty and goldfish all set up, I'll start working on bringing them around to that idea. For now, though, I don't want to push things with them... They might change their minds about letting me have a tank at all! What vegetables do goldfish like? Peas, spinach, kale....? Would those be good options?

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Your question has already been answered, but I want to add that I have a 55 and only 2 fish (well, there will be two once my newbie gets out of QT). I wouldn't go more than 2 fish in a 55 even and wish I had a 75!

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It's always best to give extra room if you can :) being under stocked makes for easier tank maintenance and less problems overall.

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And you never know what will happen in future. I have a 90 gal and 3 fish (1 large common, 1 med common, and a 3" BN pleco). I planned to get a 3rd goldfish. Then, last summer, nitrates suddenly appeared in my tap water. I'm on a spring, and there is no way to know where they came from or what to do about them. But the end result is that I'm now reluctant to get another fish, even with all this water, b/c the nitrates go up too high already with 3 fish (when starting with 10-20 in the water). The problem has now resolved, but now the pH is inexplicably going up after water changes. So now I have to do smaller, more frequent water changes. Again: Good thing I only have 3 fish!

A 40 breeder tank would be your best bet. Try to convince your family--it's a great tank.

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Peas, spinach, kale are all good.

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I have a 30g with two fancies and they are fine. I do 50% water change weekly. I have an AC70 hob which exchanges the water 10.7x per hour, and a Fluval C2 (for backup) which adds another 4.25x exchange.

I believe your fish will be healthier with some company. Life should not be lived alone.

Like all other living things I feel they need companionship for optimum health, relieving stress, and overall happiness.

Have fun & good luck :)

Edited by Mrs. Kay

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