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GoldenSpoiledRotten

Pond Upgrade... yeah, that quick. Need advice on liner.

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Should I plumb one of my overflow pipes so it lets out at the bottom, then? All I have is the Hydrostar 265gph pump, and I am not sure if my filter could handle anything higher without overflowing, though I do really want a more powerful pump for the pond and have considered running a second of those pumps to a waterfall box with more biomedia in it, then switching the big filter over to more mechanical filtration since it does an awesome job already. The water has never been more clear a week after a WC with any filtration I've used so far. :)

Would I have to plumb for a current like you mentioned if I have two pumps running on either side?

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I have been thinking about getting some sand for mine. Think it well make fish easier to see.

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You can see the overflow plumbing here

IMG_0227.jpg

The overflow pipe goes through the wall of the pond at the water level. Inside the pond, the overflow pipe goes to the bottom of the pond so when it overflows, the water that comes out came from the bottom of the pond. The overflow does not really contribute much to the flow of water in the pond. That is accomplished by the pump at one end of the pond and the filter at the other. But because the water is flowing that way, the overflow is dumping relatively dirty water.

On the outside, the overflow pipe just has a elbow to direct the flow of the water. You don't want this to be a siphon, so it ends high. :)

Your pump is quite adequate for 150 gallon pond. I have several of these. One of the pieces in the pump set has two outlets which allow you to run both a filter and a fountain. You can use this to run two filters if you want.

If you want to run two pumps, you should put them together, preferably in a prefilter box, to get a nice flow in the pond. Otherwise you get the chaotic water flow of an aquarium with a HOB.

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Hi Chelsea. Did you pic a container or design for one yet? Just curious :)

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I think I will be building from Sharon's examples. I have calculated the price, and I think it's going to be worth the extra $40-$60 instead of spending everything on a stock tank and not having much left over for extras.

It'll use my current filter, but I am still unsure as to if I should plumb the filter into a waterfall box or two instead of just hanging it over the tank. Sure, it might be a little more cash but it will also provide a nicer outflow that will cover more area. :)

I only have until next week to get all the stuff finalized... I am shooting for bare minimum 150g but might increase the size to 5ftx4ft instead of 4ft by 4ft. Every little bit counts. ;)

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Can you explain how you are thinking of using a waterfall box with your filter?

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I mainly planned to put the outputs over the edge of the water box and have the water trickle over the media before overflowing again over the edge of the waterfall. I believe this will work similarly to the way people use lava rock on their waterfalls, only I will use bioballs instead. Is that correct? I plan to cover the top of the box with a removable piece of the 2x4 with liner attached to the bottom as a lid, and setting the box into the side of the tank instead of just on top. I also had thought of using the box's plumbing and hooking up a hose to my outflows and then running it through like regular waterfall plumbing, but am not sure how I would go about that and not overflow the filter.

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Can you give a link to a waterfall you are thinking of?

If you put media in the box and flow water over the top of it, you have the same situation as a deep layer of media in a tank. The flow of water at the top of the media will churn around and will drop debris into the bottom of the box. This is pretty clean water, but not perfect, so with time, mulm will collect in the bottom. Since you are using bioballs instead of gravel, it won't get anaerobic, but you won't get much filtration either.

I strongly recommend you use the plumbing in the waterfall filter, so it can function as an upflow biofilter. A flat rock or tile over the top of the waterfall looks very nice, but putting plants in pots of gravel and setting these in the waterfall looks great too and gives the advantage of phytofiltration.

I got some very interesting medium today from a hydroponics store. It's like this -- very lightweight clay pebbles. I intend to use them instead of pea gravel in plant pots, but it also could be a very nice, inexpensive medium for a waterfall filter.

As long as the water level of the filter is above the water level in the waterfall, the filter shouldn't overflow.

Edited by shakaho

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I'm sure you've posted a picture of your filter, but I can't find it. Could you post it here? I have an idea for how you could make a nice waterfall without getting a waterfall filter box. What size are the outlet pipes on your filter?

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GOPR0354.JPG

GOPR0355.JPG

Here are the two I found.

I have a 1" outflow and a 1/2", I believe. But they both run through 3/4" holes in the pot because of the pipe attachments.

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So pond people... what do you think of this design? I think I could replicate it easily with a square or rectangular shape. There are a few parts to the video, but here is part 1.

Edited by ChelseaM

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Heavy. I guess you could take it apart to move it.

Actually I was thinking of something similar this morning for an upgrade on my lotus pond. The "Lincoln Logs" style has a cute rustic look. You could make it rectangular much easier that that one, The notches have to be cut exactly right or it won't fit together. Also your timbers need to be very straight. That takes a lot of sorting, but usually you can find a guy who'll help you with that. Sometimes they have great sales on landscape timbers at HD/Lowes. That's your cheapest lumber.

Another way of making a take-apart frame is with end-lap joints that you hold together with a pin through holes in the lap. This would be strongest if you glued the laps of each rectangle then used the pins to hold the stacked rectangles together. It's a lot easier to cut laps than notches.

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I was thinking of just doing some 2x6s so it wouldn't be too heavy. I figure it would be tall enough with fewer boards and not require as much support as the plywood design does, and I could make some u-shaped braces with the leftover wood to stabilize the longer sides just that bit more. I don't figure it to be too much more heavy than the plywood, but maybe it would be. The pros of it are that it's going to cost a little less and I won't have to screw anything together if I play my cards right. But the con is that if my liner breaks there isn't even any wood stopping the water from leaking everywhere. I suppose I could put a cheap tarp inside before the underlay for the liner.

Edited by ChelseaM

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I'm not sure what you are planning.

If you are talking about making a topless, bottomless box out of 2x6s, you would need 6 eight-foot 2x6s to make it ~ 4'x4'x16". One pressure-treated 2x6 weighs 17.5 pounds. That's already 105 pounds. Two-inch lumber warps under pressure. That's why when you build a wall with 2x4s, you make it 4 inches (actually 3.5 inches) thick rather than 2 inches (actually 1.5 inches).

When you make a box out of a 2x4 frame covered with plywood, most of what you have is air -- a lot lighter than solid wood.

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The 1/2" sheathing plywood I had planned to use was pretty heavy stuff, combined with 2x4s and the 1x8s I had planned for the frame and benches. If we assume that it is 1.5lbs/sq.ft., we get 48lbs for a 4'x8' piece. (EHow gave me that weight, not sure how accurate that is.) I would be putting the ply on both sides of the frame, plus one big piece on the bottom.

My math sucks, so I am not sure exactly how much each thing will weigh out. I don't even know if I did that math correctly. :rofl I am expecting the thing to be darn heavy any way I spin it.

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So at this point it looks like I have more time than I thought. My Stepdad got it in his head to build me a pond with the front and back being made of the glass from some of our old sliding doors so I can see the fish from both angles. He says it is "For when you bring your fish home and need a place to put them." So I will still be building this pond, but he will have another for me and likely later for him. I am suspicious of his reasoning behind this and believe that it is mainly to give him something to do, not for me. But I won't look a gift horse in the mouth, especially when it involves a 6ft long pond with a viewing panel or two!

Edited by ChelseaM

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Who cares about his motivation. That should be awesome!

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I know it will. I am just suspicious by nature. :teehee I can't wait to see it done.

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White sand on the bottom, or safe paint sealed in would work. White really helps to reflect light back, up and under the fish to keep dark colors dark..

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So I seriously doubt Sean's pond is going to hold. It's already bowing and hasn't been filled for even an hour. But either way I have $400 set aside for a build or a plastic tank, so I am covered.

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You can get an 8' x 30" swimming pool on eBay for $50. No tools required to set up. Holds 639 gallons. Weighs 14 pounds. Easy to inflate and deflate.

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Too much in my yard that can break inflatables. We live under many trees.

I was kinda also hoping to get something moveable, until Sean started this project. He wasted 75 bucks on a liner because I am very scared to put my fish in that the way it is bowing.

Edited by ChelseaM

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Can he add to it to make it a little more structurally sound? Do you have any pics so maybe we could throw some suggestions out there?

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:( That stinks

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