Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
GoldenSpoiledRotten

Pond Upgrade... yeah, that quick. Need advice on liner.

Recommended Posts

What kind of paint should I be using on the outside? Just some waterproof spray paint?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What if you threw in a shower curtain or piece of cloth or painted the inside of your choice of color and then lined that with one of those thin clear painting tarps you use to protect your carpet when painting a wall. Very thin but shouldnt matter since it is inside a tub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not spray paint, for sure. You could go through several cans and that gets expensive. You want an exterior Latex paint. The store brands in Home Depot and Lowes are very good. You can probably get by with a quart and can get it mixed to any color you want. The best tool for painting plywood is a 6" roller. It's fast and easy to get a nice finish. It's easier to handle and clean than the full sized rollers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So... Umm... Here is my list so far, as I don't need some tools anymore due to my boyfriend's awesome grandfather letting me work at his place with him.

Umm... What else do I need?

Edited by ChelseaM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just throwing out an idea.... Instead of using 2x4s and plywood, use 2x8s. Stack 2 of them on top of each other. That will give you a depth of just about 15". Not saying it's a better idea, just something to think about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Jason. :) I am still in the planning stage as this won't happen until the weekend after my exams most likely, so I have 2 weeks to get it right.

I had planned on doing something like the links Sharon posted, but if there is an easier option I am all ears.

Edited by ChelseaM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So... Umm... Here is my list so far, as I don't need some tools anymore due to my boyfriend's awesome grandfather letting me work at his place with him.

Get stainless steel screws.

  • Exterior Paint

  • 2 Sheets of Plywood for covering the frame and flooring.

  • 20 sq feet of Felt or Moisture Barrier for protection/insulation (I think they can cut this for you in the store? Maybe? Which one should I choose?)

I don't understand what this is for. Where are you using it and why? I'm not saying it's wrong, but I can't say what is best unless I know what you want it to do.

  • Pot feet for raising my filter so I can put it inside the pond (Do these look safe to submerge?)

Why are you putting the filter in the pond? I get nervous about setting something heavy on a liner. At least put an extra piece of liner under the filter. Unless the filter is not taller than the water depth, I'd just set it on the bottom. From experience, I can tell you that fish love to hide in a small space under a plant pot. If that space is not substantially higher than the fish, they will eventually break down their dorsal fins. So if you want to raise the filter, either use a solid base of bricks or a stool or something that is tall enough they can swim under easily.

Umm... What else do I need?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it done yet? :rofl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So... Umm... Here is my list so far, as I don't need some tools anymore due to my boyfriend's awesome grandfather letting me work at his place with him.

Get stainless steel screws.

  • Exterior Paint

  • 2 Sheets of Plywood for covering the frame and flooring.

  • 20 sq feet of Felt or Moisture Barrier for protection/insulation (I think they can cut this for you in the store? Maybe? Which one should I choose?)

I don't understand what this is for. Where are you using it and why? I'm not saying it's wrong, but I can't say what is best unless I know what you want it to do.

It is to be my liner's underlay. I wanted some protection for the liner itself from the wood, especially since my liner is only 14.5mil thick. I figured either of those would offer protection, with either the moisture barrier offering protection to the wood in case of a liner leak or the felt offering some insulation and a slight cushion to the bottom and sides. It's my substitute for the Styrofoam.

  • Pot feet for raising my filter so I can put it inside the pond (Do these look safe to submerge?)

Why are you putting the filter in the pond? I get nervous about setting something heavy on a liner. At least put an extra piece of liner under the filter. Unless the filter is not taller than the water depth, I'd just set it on the bottom. From experience, I can tell you that fish love to hide in a small space under a plant pot. If that space is not substantially higher than the fish, they will eventually break down their dorsal fins. So if you want to raise the filter, either use a solid base of bricks or a stool or something that is tall enough they can swim under easily.

The filter is only 12" tall at the spouts. The water depth would be higher than the outputs. I don't want to run the risk of backflow, so I figured setting it on something too small for the fish to get underneath might work, as I worry about breaking down the dorsal fins if I use anything man-made as a hiding place. I did plan on adding 1 or 2 extra pieces of liner where this is going, as well as extra underlay. I almost thought of doing some extra 2x4 attached to the wood base under the liner and underlay, but would be nervous that it could puncture the liner.

I wanted to add the filter inside the pond to keep things compact, so I wouldn't have to worry about the spouts not reaching where they're supposed to or worry about positioning the filter around my pond.

Umm... What else do I need?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you could paint the bottom with krylon fusion spray paint. it is supposed to be aquarium safe.

I do NOT recommend this. I painted a filter intake w/ Krylon Fusion, and followed all the instructions to be found on the internet about letting it cure for a week, etc. before putting it in the tank. Seemed OK until I had to reposition it--took the plastic clip off and paint came off w/ the clip! That was that. IMO NO paint is safe for fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about something like this? http://www.amazon.com/Response-Liquid-Rubber-Sealant-Coating/dp/B005ZFEPRO/ref=sr_1_2?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1397142350&sr=1-2&keywords=spray+sealant

Its a bit more expensive though.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I worry that it isn't fish safe and that it would crack or break if the wood were to give in shape at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I can see you're reasoning there. But a product like that would be a good alternative to pait. It would just require some reasurch to see if it is drinking water safe or aquatic safe.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right. I am still really researching everything, so it's always good to have more ideas. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What most DIYers use under liners is carpet. Every carpet store has a dumpster where the installers dump the scraps left over from the installation. If you go to the store and ask if they have scraps ~ 4ft wide that you need for padding, they will usually either direct you to the dumpster or go out there with you. Select plush carpet if possible. I got some of the looped type, and it is a PITA to cut. After you cut the backing with a knife, you have to take a scissors and cut the loops -- which are tough to cut. With plush, just tip the carpet over, cut to size with your knife, and you are done. If you don't want to use carpet, definitely use the felted underliner from the pond department. It's nice and thick and protects well from slivers. Unless you sand and paint the plywood on the sides, this should be lined as well as the bottom.

The pot feet are expensive and may not raise your filter high enough. Debris will collect underneath. How easy is it for you to lift the filter out of the pond? That's the only way to clean it if it's inside the pond. You would do much better to stack bricks to support the filter, and these are really cheap right now at HD.

ldcastle4 in. x 8 in. Concrete Paver

669cd5e9-bcf0-42b9-b1b2-3e59cf2cd635_300


$0.25 / each
Was $0.42

I seems so much easier to have the filter outside the pond, but it's your choice. Just set it next to the pond on some blocks. If the spouts are not long enough, get some couplers and elongate them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The filter is super simple for me to clean without moving it if I use my Python, so I wouldn't have to do much removing from the pond unless I had to clean underneath it. I really just take the media out and put it in a bucket, pop out the main intake stem, and shove my python down in there and let it do the dirty work, every once in awhile adding a small bucket of old water to stir up the crud or shoving a baby bottle brush into the outflow to get rid of the gunk. Either inside or outside the pond I would likely do this.

I wonder if I could find a small, cheap watercourse on amazon or something and order it. It would allow me to install it into one of the corners of the pond and not have to worry about the tubes being too short as well as not having to worry about keeping the filter in the pond.

Edit: Haha this is starting to approach the cost of the stock tank now. It's going to be worth it though.

Edited by ChelseaM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's way cheaper to just make the outlet pipes longer -- like $0.60.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah it is. I am just excited to be able to 100% design my own fish space from the frame up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably already know the answer to this, but I want a second opinion anyway.

If I used something like this on the floor and used silicone for grout, would I be able to create removable tiles for the pond that wouldn't scratch the liner or poison the fish, do you think?

Edited by ChelseaM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would cost a lot, would be heavy and hard to keep clean, but it probably could be done. Actually some people who want to have rocks on the bottom of their ponds,but don't want rotting debris between them, put a layer of mortar on top of the liner on the bottom of the pond (and sometimes up the sides), set the rocks in the mortar, then seal the concrete. The problem with this is the weight. If you want a heavy pond to be movable, you need a reinforced bottom with casters on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is what I worried about.

I was more thinking of something blue and light for the bottom, so I don't have to do sand. I figured the removable tiles I could do with the silicone would be neat. I don't want to have to have substrate, but after watching Merlot disappear into my pond on Sunday I have to think of something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's your objection to sand? It really makes the fish show up and is as easy to keep clean as bare bottom.

IMG_0377.jpg

With time it gets a pretty green tinge.

a8f22589-9099-49d7-b1c6-25279c6bff49.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mainly because I have had it before and hated it. :( I didn't find it easy to clean at all, but that is the same with any substrate. I also worry that when I go to move the pond I may have to remove the sand which is messy and annoying. And I am not too worried about it getting a smell, but my parents seem to be. :/ It's so annoying dealing with the crap from them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess the main reason my sand stayed clean was the gentle flow across the bottom. You can see in the pictures above that the filter and the fresh water reservoir are both putting water into the pond at one end and the pump and overflow pipe were both taking it out at the other end. This creates a clean-to-dirty gradient in the water, and since the pump and the overflow pipe are at the dirty end, the effectiveness of both the filter and water change are maximized. While the flow is very gentle, I could sit and watch the bits of debris slowly flow toward the pump and overflow. So cleaning just consisted of vacuuming the bottom at that one end. Since sand does not trap debris like gravel, there's no need to stir it up. While you do get a thin biofilm on the individual grains of sand, you don't get the thick (sometimes more than an eighth of an inch) biofilm that develops on a continuous hard surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...