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SweetMamaKaty

Are any Fancies TOO fancy for a beginner?

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While I'm biding my time until SwimFish gets a tankmate, I'm trying to research out really well what type we want. We're really drawn to the looks of Orandas and Black Moors, and I love seeing pics of gorgeous Butterfly and Veiltails...

But I don't want to take on more than I'm capable of caring for properly either. Wen infection, injured eyes, floatiness, torn tails... Our current fish is a Fantail. Is there a list from least to most fancy of the fancies? I'd love to hear your observations on the different types, things to consider, etc!!

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I've only ever had fantails, ryukins and recently branched out to a ranchu.

From my experience, the fantails do seem to be hardier. I've never had a floaty fantail whereas I've definitely had floaty ryukins. I haven't had any wen issues *knocks on wood* but that is one reason I've stayed away from wenned fish for so long.

Black moors often turn orange so be prepared for that. And they can have eye problems/shrinkage.

In the end, though, I think it's a lot of luck and/or genetics. Some ryukins and other short deep bodied fish will not have floaty/SBD not matter what you feed, nitrates, etc while others seem prone to it. :idont

Good luck with you decision. :D

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I agree with Lisa :)

Water quality, large frequent water changes, no pokey objects in tank, feeding SMALL meals are all a good idea no matter what fish you have :)

:goodluck

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All fancy goldfish have their own problems, yes. They all seem to share the same likes for water parameters, etc. though, as well as all having the potential to develop some of the same problems. I too started out with fancies. I don't see them as difficult for a beginner, just overwhelming sometimes. That's more for keepers new to goldfish in general than anything.

My suggestion is to just do some research here on Koko's when it comes to your favorite breeds. You'll likely find yourself deciding what you want based on that. In the end only take what you can handle. Each new breed of goldfish is an adventure. :)

Edited by ChelseaM

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I will say that if you want to ease yourself in to goldfish, single tails are much better to deal with. They are just as fun, too. :)

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I would recommend a strong swimmer with good vision to partner with SwimFish. Maybe an Oranda since you like them? I would avoid Bubble Eyes and Celestials with him.

Edited by jmetzger72

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I would say get whatever you like best because you have plenty of advice on care for each type available to you here on kokos. You only have so much space in a tank so you might as well fill it with your favorite types :) Also, this new pet might be with you for quite a while, so I would just pick what you like best.

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I would agree with Allison and pick a healthy fish I really loved. Every breed has sub-types and (based solely on the anecdotal evidence gleaned from reading this forum) the individual fish with longer, narrower bodies seem less prone to develop certain kinds of problems. Look for a healthy oranda, or fantail, or ranchu or telescope that seems vigorous, and which does not have a body shape at the extreme end of its breed type.

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Great points everyone! Very encouraging, as I was afraid I would hear, 'Oh, you shouldn't really get an xyz..."

But now I also have to fully narrow it down on my own and I want one of each. :D

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Great points everyone! Very encouraging, as I was afraid I would hear, 'Oh, you shouldn't really get an xyz..."

But now I also have to fully narrow it down on my own and I want one of each. :D

:rofl ^^ :bingo:

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I had the worst luck with telescopes in the beginning. That is the only goldfish that comes to mind that was at my LFS.

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Healthy fish with a longer-than-usual body are your best bet. I would stick to fantails, orandas (with small wens), or ryukins to start with. Of course, as Alex pointed out, the long-bodied "pond type" fish are the least demanding.

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Keep in mind that a long-bodied single tailed goldfish will outswim your fantail when searching for food. For that reason it is not recommended keeping them in the same tank with your fantail, although some people do it :)

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Seriously, how far do they have to swim to get to the food? If the comet swims twice as fast as the fantail for the two feet it takes to get to the food, and both swim as fast as they can, how much will the comet eat before the fantail gets there? When I had a tank with three fancies and a comet, the first fish to the food was the pearlscale -- the slowest swimmer. She watched me approach, swam slowly to where I appeared to be going, and was there with her mouth open when I put in the food while the other fish were still dashing back and forth in excitement.

The only fish that may have a problem with competition for food are those with visual impairment -- telescopes, wenned fish with their eyes covered, blind fish -- all of which have to wait until the food is in the water so they can smell it before they can start searching.

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Keep in mind that a long-bodied single tailed goldfish will outswim your fantail when searching for food. For that reason it is not recommended keeping them in the same tank with your fantail, although some people do it :)

I really don't think we recommend this anymore. It has been found to generally not be the truth.

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I agree that fantails are a good starter fancy goldfish. Black moors are very hardy too, and yes, mine did turn completely orange. :-) My healthiest fish ever was (is) a black moor, in fact.

I wouldn't say the fancier varieties such as celestial eyes and bubble eyes are harder to keep per se, but you do have to pay closer attention to sharp objects in the tank and making sure everyone gets enough to eat. However, the same is true for all fish. I have kept both, as well as oranda, ryukin, fantail, telescope, lionhead and ranchu. I like them all; I can't even say I'm partial to any variety!

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

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I would suggest also avoid expensive breeds like Tosakins and Jikins, but that's not really a fish that comes up often and people can afford to buy in the first place. :rofl

Just have fun with choosing your fish and enjoy taking care of them. :)

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I would suggest also avoid expensive breeds like Tosakins and Jikins, but that's not really a fish that comes up often and people can afford to buy in the first place. :rofl

Just have fun with choosing your fish and enjoy taking care of them. :)

This makes total sense. Tosakins cost around $200 and are incredibly rare ... not something I would buy as my first fish (or probably ever), LOL. They are beautiful, but you need a pond to appreciate their full beauty IMO. From the side/in an aquarium, they just look like ryukins. It's the top view that is truly magnificent.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

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I would suggest also avoid expensive breeds like Tosakins and Jikins, but that's not really a fish that comes up often and people can afford to buy in the first place. :rofl

Just have fun with choosing your fish and enjoy taking care of them. :)

This makes total sense. Tosakins cost around $200 and are incredibly rare ... not something I would buy as my first fish (or probably ever), LOL. They are beautiful, but you need a pond to appreciate their full beauty IMO. From the side/in an aquarium, they just look like ryukins. It's the top view that is truly magnificent.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I see! No, I'm still debating with myself if I want to order online or find somewhere I can buy in person less expensively. :D

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I like to do it in person. Also I like ti get them really young so you can watch them grow :)

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I would suggest also avoid expensive breeds like Tosakins and Jikins, but that's not really a fish that comes up often and people can afford to buy in the first place. :rofl

Just have fun with choosing your fish and enjoy taking care of them. :)

This makes total sense. Tosakins cost around $200 and are incredibly rare ... not something I would buy as my first fish (or probably ever), LOL. They are beautiful, but you need a pond to appreciate their full beauty IMO. From the side/in an aquarium, they just look like ryukins. It's the top view that is truly magnificent.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I see! No, I'm still debating with myself if I want to order online or find somewhere I can buy in person less expensively. :D
I've always bought locally. Don't get me wrong, I would LOVE to buy a high-quality fish online, but shipping is so darn expensive that I talk myself out of it every time. There is also something to be said for viewing the fish in person, how it reacts to you, etc. Most of my fish have "chosen me" in the store, and it's fun to go in every week and see what they got in. Some local stores will also take special requests for varieties, colors, etc.

If you intend to keep only one tank with a limited number of fish, then the cost of buying online would be justifiable, IMO. Once my mom moves out of my condo in a couple of years, I plan to get one big tank in the living room downstairs and THEN I plan to buy my dream fish online. I'll also have more experience by then and will feel more comfortable spending more money on fish. Right now I have several tanks and couldn't imagine spending up to $1,000 to stock them all! I'm frustrated because my mom hates fish and won't have a tank in the house while she's here ... especially the size tank I want (100+ gallons). :-(

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Edited by *Amanda*

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I don't think any one type is any harder to keep than any other type. Remembering not to put sharp objects in a telescope's tank isn't something that requires extensive experience or knowledge. Wen issues sound pretty bad but there's tons of other sicknesses and problems that any goldfish could develop such as tumors and floaty-ness. Individual problem fish who are prone to issues such as dropsy would be difficult for beginners (And for everyone no matter how long they've kept fish, really) but you could pick the most "ideal" goldfish possible and it could become sick. You just never know. I don't think it's worth it to try to make that a factor in selecting a fish.

I think you should pick whatever type you want so you get the most enjoyment out of your tank. :)

Edited by Goldenhero

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I would suggest also avoid expensive breeds like Tosakins and Jikins, but that's not really a fish that comes up often and people can afford to buy in the first place. :rofl

Just have fun with choosing your fish and enjoy taking care of them. :)

This makes total sense. Tosakins cost around $200 and are incredibly rare ... not something I would buy as my first fish (or probably ever), LOL. They are beautiful, but you need a pond to appreciate their full beauty IMO. From the side/in an aquarium, they just look like ryukins. It's the top view that is truly magnificent.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

I see! No, I'm still debating with myself if I want to order online or find somewhere I can buy in person less expensively. :D
I've always bought locally. Don't get me wrong, I would LOVE to buy a high-quality fish online, but shipping is so darn expensive that I talk myself out of it every time. There is also something to be said for viewing the fish in person, how it reacts to you, etc. Most of my fish have "chosen me" in the store, and it's fun to go in every week and see what they got in. Some local stores will also take special requests for varieties, colors, etc.

If you intend to keep only one tank with a limited number of fish, then the cost of buying online would be justifiable, IMO. Once my mom moves out of my condo in a couple of years, I plan to get one big tank in the living room downstairs and THEN I plan to buy my dream fish online. I'll also have more experience by then and will feel more comfortable spending more money on fish. Right now I have several tanks and couldn't imagine spending up to $1,000 to stock them all! I'm frustrated because my mom hates fish and won't have a tank in the house while she's here ... especially the size tank I want (100+ gallons). :-(

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Very true, and the ratio of that cost to my experience level is definitely out of whack right now!

I don't think any one type is any harder to keep than any other type. Remembering not to put sharp objects in a telescope's tank isn't something that requires extensive experience or knowledge. Wen issues sound pretty bad but there's tons of other sicknesses and problems that any goldfish could develop such as tumors and floaty-ness. Individual problem fish who are prone to issues such as dropsy would be difficult for beginners (And for everyone no matter how long they've kept fish, really) but you could pick the most "ideal" goldfish possible and it could become sick. You just never know. I don't think it's worth it to try to make that a factor in selecting a fish.

I think you should pick whatever type you want so you get the most enjoyment out of your tank. :)

This makes a lot of sense, thanks!

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Keep in mind that a long-bodied single tailed goldfish will outswim your fantail when searching for food. For that reason it is not recommended keeping them in the same tank with your fantail, although some people do it :)

I really don't think we recommend this anymore. It has been found to generally not be the truth.[/quote

Thanks Chelsea, I have never heard that before. It is so contrary to everything I've read on practically every site on the internet. It always made sense I guess. I still wouldn't combine the single tails with my fancies. Not sure why now hehe. Just old school I suppose. :-) xo

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I've only ever had fantails, ryukins and recently branched out to a ranchu.

From my experience, the fantails do seem to be hardier. I've never had a floaty fantail whereas I've definitely had floaty ryukins. I haven't had any wen issues *knocks on wood* but that is one reason I've stayed away from wenned fish for so long.

Black moors often turn orange so be prepared for that. And they can have eye problems/shrinkage.

In the end, though, I think it's a lot of luck and/or genetics. Some ryukins and other short deep bodied fish will not have floaty/SBD not matter what you feed, nitrates, etc while others seem prone to it. :idont

Good luck with you decision. :D

Lisa... What do you mean by shrinkage?

Good luck SMK with your choice! I bought my first goldie from an LFS with no breed in mind (I didn't know anything about fish keeping! :o) I remember there being hundreds of fishies in lots of different tanks but there was one I kept being drawn to which made me ignore all the others. I don't know why because they all looked very similar. I still have him today :heart

I think maybe the best way to choose a breed if you cant decide is to see them in person and see if you are drawn to a particular fish.

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