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When a moor is not a moor


goldiegeek

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If you want to be stringent, a black moor is a specific line of goldfish developed in England,

You might wanna check your facts on that.

In page 130 of Joseph Smartt's book, Goldfish Varieties and Genetics, the "moor" is a distinct class of goldfish, according to one British goldfish group, while all telescopes are considered moors by another...

This is where some people get the idea that a moor is a telescope, but a telescope is not necessarily a moor.

You may want to read that once moor, I think you are confusing black moor with broadtail moor. Broadtail moors were developed in britain, but black moors development in china predate the goldfish's arrival in England.

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If you want to be stringent, a black moor is a specific line of goldfish developed in England,

You might wanna check your facts on that.

In page 130 of Joseph Smartt's book, Goldfish Varieties and Genetics, the "moor" is a distinct class of goldfish, according to one British goldfish group, while all telescopes are considered moors by another...

This is where some people get the idea that a moor is a telescope, but a telescope is not necessarily a moor.

You may want to read that once moor, I think you are confusing black moor with broadtail moor. Broadtail moors were developed in britain, but black moors development in china predate the goldfish's arrival in England.

I didn't say the the black moor did not have its origin in China, when it was not called a moor, but rather dragon eyes.

I said that the moor was ascribed to a certain strain to black telescope by a certain goldfish society with narrowly defined differences.

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You may be right about the origin of the term Moor but I can't find any proof of that. I pulled out William Innes' The complete aquarium book 1917. It mentions the Moor 30 years before the britts made up their standard. Page 185.

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I think, currently in the United States, the name Black Moor refers to any solid black Telescope. Anything else is a just a Telescope. The one exception would be the black and white Panda which is also labeled a Moor.

Edited by jmetzger72
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GG, your goldfish is great.

One of the things I love about goldfish are the physical changes they go through as they age.

Regardless of whether you can prove it is the text book def. of a moor from a book in 1917, I find it to be the defenition of beautiful.

Definitely a keeper.

:)

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You may be right about the origin of the term Moor but I can't find any proof of that. I pulled out William Innes' The complete aquarium book 1917. It mentions the Moor 30 years before the britts made up their standard. Page 185.

There is this to consider as well. The goldfish came to be appreciated by the Brits long before it became the American ubiquity that it is these days, and it is in those Brit days that these names came up.

The telescopes in China are dragon-eyes, no? The term moor has no meaning there, and doubtfully ever did.

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... a moor is not a moor anymore when they weren't a moor to start off. :)

When you brought the fish home it was already partially orange, so not a moor at all.

I kinda have given up on the "moor" term unless it is a solid velvety black adult fish and just say "Tele."

I've probably seen more moors turning than staying black...

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Your "fish" :) is beautiful regardless of color.

Looks like she still has a while to go with the color change to Orange.

It's been about a year, so very slow. I love it though! Very Halloweeny. lol

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GG, your goldfish is great.

One of the things I love about goldfish are the physical changes they go through as they age.

Regardless of whether you can prove it is the text book def. of a moor from a book in 1917, I find it to be the defenition of beautiful.

Definitely a keeper.

:)

Thanks! That's so nice:) I am also a huge fan of the changes. When I have a "you grew an inch overnight" moment, I'll take a peek at a photo from when they were juveniles and it's just shocking how different they look. I have a ranchu that was almost all black with yellow. Then the black turned yellow as well. Now the yellow is changing to a deeper orange in some spots. It's like I've had three fish with her. lol

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What a beautiful fish!!

This one got me a "photo of the week". She's a doll, too. But all moors are...I mean telescopes...I guess right now she's a mooroscope. I'll go with that:)

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What a beautiful fish!!

This one got me a "photo of the week". She's a doll, too. But all moors are...I mean telescopes...I guess right now she's a mooroscope. I'll go with that:)

:rofl3

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