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tank for angelfish


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  • Regular Member

I do kind of have to disagree with this.

If you ever actually had an angelfish, they do swim left-right-left-right, and not up-down-up-down.

They swim just like goldfish, but due to their height require a minimum height of tank.
"Tall tanks are better for angelfish" generally relates to small tanks, due to the fish's height. Some people keep angels in 20g for breeding, and a 20g tall vs long makes a big difference in height; four inches (10cm) to be precise. The 20L is only 12" / 30cm tall and really does not give the fish much room to move properly

For a large tank like yours, I would still rather go with the longer tank. The tanks you mentioned have a height difference of a whooping 5cm / 2inches, while the LENGTH difference is 20cm / 8inches. The benefit of the larger footprint clearly outweighs the additional 2"/5cm of height, especially if you are planning to keep a group of angels. More possible distance between the fish means less aggression. :)

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Ok I have had angels and while i agree taller vs longer sometimes it not accurate (such as some column tanks. ) but the question here is giving the two fish types here which is better for each fish type. Now if I remember from your other thread you have two angels and two goldfish right? If that is the case I would say given the two types and quantities of fish the goldfish would see more benefit from the bigger longer tank than the angels.

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  • Regular Member

I agree with the above posts. It's not that goldfish only need vertical swimming space, they need both. My experience has been that angelfish do a lot of horizontal swimming as well. So, they need both tall and long tanks, Lol.

A better rule would be that an adult angel need a tank at least 16-18 inches deep.

Now, depending on the size of your tanks and your fish, it may be beneficial to move the angelfish to the taller tank. I would probably keep the angel in the taller tank and the goldfish in the longer one.

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How many of each? Angelfish require 10 gallons for them self. (no you can put one in a 10 gallon tank) BN plecos need 5 gallons each. Red tail sharks can get aggressive and need a lot of room to roam and hide. Neon tetras and angelfish for me always meant angelfish dinner on the go. Sounds like for all those your listing and the fact that some of them need to be in schools you need a 55 well planted or bigger tank.

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Yeah you sound rather heavily stocked. Id just leave them in the bigger tank then. I thought you just had the to angels when I sugested the move. Later on you may need a bigger tank for the goldfish but they will be ok in the taller tank for a while if not longer depending on how they grow.

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  • 4 months later...
  • Regular Member

Have your tetras been with your angels since the angels were tiny? If so, they might be OK. I got mine (angels) when they were the size of a nickel with fins, and they grew up with small tetras in the tank. I have zero issues with my angels trying to eat the tetras (or anything but their flakes and bloodworms), but if you have angels large enough to eat the tetras and try to add them, they will likely think the tetras are a lunch buffet. Generally, if you want to do angels with small tetras you have to get your tank set up, make sure it is at least moderately planted, and get your tetras to their full grown, adult size. Then add the smallest healthy angels you can find, and keep them well fed. They'll go for the easy food source, and don't seem to recognize the small fish in their space as "food". Keep in mind that neon tetras are a natural food source for the angelfish, though, so there is always a risk of one or two of them being interested in the tetras, even if you use the above method of setting up your tank. Also, this may not work at all with some of the more aggressive angel species (p. altum or P. leopoldi)- but it's worked out fine for a few years, here, with the common angels (p. scalare), who are a little more chill than the more wild types- well, unless they're spawning. Then, you see the cichlid in them, for sure. :)

Edited by JamieMonster
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