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jmetzger72

Melafix and Pimafix?

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I touched on this subject in the LTAF thread. But, I would like to expand the discussion. Can those of you who have used Melafix and Pimafix please contribute your reviews (particularly for goldfish). I am considering these products for mild injuries and infections when I would rather not pull out the big guns such as Kanaplex, Metrodinazole, Metro Meds or Medi Gold.

The internet, as usual, is littered with both positive and negative anecdotal reviews. So, it is hard to get a grasp on the reliability of these products. People seem to like them for Betta fin problems in particular. The Cichlid folks also seem to like them. The Discus crowd hates them and I didn't find much feedback from the Goldfish sector. So, where better to ask than here!

Edited by jmetzger72

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I thought there was a reason melafix and/or pimafix weren't recommended here ..... but I don't remember why. Do either of them effect the biological filter?

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I got a telescope 2 months ago from a lfs that had really torn fins after using the melafix and pimafix with aquarium salt the surface water filled with bubbles and the goldfish stayed at the top of the tank as if it couldn't breathe. I ended up sitting next to it for at least an hour and a half scooping bubbles. The medicine did work quickly though.

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I use melafix!! and am using it at the moment!! I have always found it works well for fin damage/rot! I am using it for bad scrapes to stop secondary infection!! so far so good.

I have never had a problem with it affecting biological filter!:-)

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I recently used Melafix for four days (I didn't need to go the full seven days). One of my orandas dislodged a scale and the Melafix appears to have calmed down the skin underneath the scale (the scale is hanging loose now). The other oranda had a couple of small white bumps on their caudal fin. While I was treating the oranda with the dislodged scale, the treatment appears to have worked on this other oranda's small white bumps. I hadn't expected that.

It is a bit weird to see bubbles at the tank surface caused by the Melafix, but the treatment appears to have worked. I did not have any salt in my tank at the time of treatment.

No cycle bump either.

I would use Melafix again.

Edited by LisaCGold

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I thought there was a reason melafix and/or pimafix weren't recommended here ..... but I don't remember why. Do either of them effect the biological filter?

Neither effect the beneficial bacteria.

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The problem with testing the effectiveness of a medication for treating minor injuries is...they often heal with no intervention. I took a miraculous pill that cured my Flu in seven days :rofl

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The problem with testing the effectiveness of a medication for treating minor injuries is...they often heal with no intervention. I took a miraculous pill that cured my Flu in seven days :rofl

And this is exactly why I am hesitant to make recommendations, not knowing whether I am asking people to buy very expensive sugar pills, or not.

Recently, I have had occasion to watch Melafix at work on some wen issues where it wasn't resolved after Metro-Meds. The person tried Melafix as per directions, and weeks later, the problem is still gone. :)

There is also an extensive amount of scientific literature on tea tree oil, so of which is on its ability as an antiparasite.

So, based on this, I will certainly recommend the use of Melafix at least (and sometimes Pimafix), but not as broadly as what the bottles claim to be able to do. :)

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The problem with testing the effectiveness of a medication for treating minor injuries is...they often heal with no intervention. I took a miraculous pill that cured my Flu in seven days :rofl

With regards to the treatment of my orandas using Melafix (see my post above), their problems were present for some time. For Whale, he had the small white bumps on his tail for over a month. I chose to not do any treatment for it during that time. The bumps changed a bit (a little more bumps appeared) during that time. With just four days of Melafix, the bumps are barely there. I can't say for 100% sure that Melafix affected the bumps, but the timing leads me to think that it did. For Jack, I had swabbed the lose scale with HP and for several days after that the skin underneath got aggravated. I started using Melafix right after the swab. Now in comparison to Whale's issues, I'm less sure that Melafix helped Jack but it certainly did not hurt.

I think if the minor injury does not go away on its own for so many days, then I would think about using Melafix.

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Lisa, that is a very sensible criterion, and one that I follow as well. :)

I am glad that Rob brought up his point though, which reminds is all that for all minor issues (and actually the not so minor ones too), look to clean water and changes in maintenance and feeding routines first and then go from there.

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Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so negative about the products. I read that one of the ingredients of Pimafix is clove oil. Is that true?

There do seem to be many positive experiences with Melafix, so I might try it in the future.

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Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so negative about the products. I read that one of the ingredients of Pimafix is clove oil. Is that true?

There do seem to be many positive experiences with Melafix, so I might try it in the future.

I don't think you were being negative, but were reasonably skeptical, as one should be if one were to spend money one something if hopes that it will help the health of a valued animal. :)

I actually missed this the first time I read the info, but there is quite a bit of eugenol in the Pimafix extract. Eugenol of course is the active ingredient of clove oil.

I don't think that the amount contained in Pimafix is enough to cause acute issues as recommended doses, but I don't know about if used chronically.

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Lisa, that is a very sensible criterion, and one that I follow as well. :)

You're the one who guided me on the Melafix adventure! :) Just a side note for readers: Melafix does not work on wen color changes, which is what I originally was using it for. I thought the wen color change was an injury. :teehee

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Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so negative about the products. I read that one of the ingredients of Pimafix is clove oil. Is that true?

There do seem to be many positive experiences with Melafix, so I might try it in the future.

Skepticism good! I didn't mean to respond with any intent to "tell you so." More just like "here is my experience." :)

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Thanks, Lisa, and I didn't think that you were implying anything in your post :)

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Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so negative about the products. I read that one of the ingredients of Pimafix is clove oil. Is that true?

There do seem to be many positive experiences with Melafix, so I might try it in the future.

I don't think you were being negative, but were reasonably skeptical, as one should be if one were to spend money one something if hopes that it will help the health of a valued animal. :)

I actually missed this the first time I read the info, but there is quite a bit of eugenol in the Pimafix extract. Eugenol of course is the active ingredient of clove oil.

I don't think that the amount contained in Pimafix is enough to cause acute issues as recommended doses, but I don't know about if used chronically.

Is it habit forming in goldfish? Do they call it "special-P"?

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I have used Melifix several times and never had any issues with it. I use the full dose on the first day and a half dose on the remaining 6 days.

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Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so negative about the products. I read that one of the ingredients of Pimafix is clove oil. Is that true?

There do seem to be many positive experiences with Melafix, so I might try it in the future.

I don't think you were being negative, but were reasonably skeptical, as one should be if one were to spend money one something if hopes that it will help the health of a valued animal. :)

I actually missed this the first time I read the info, but there is quite a bit of eugenol in the Pimafix extract. Eugenol of course is the active ingredient of clove oil.

I don't think that the amount contained in Pimafix is enough to cause acute issues as recommended doses, but I don't know about if used chronically.

Is it habit forming in goldfish? Do they call it "special-P"?

:rofl :rofl :rofl Are you implying that we are drug dealers to our fish?! :tomuch

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I did a lot of reading and ran into a very interesting post on these two from 2008. As I cannot link to another forum, I'll paste the post here.

**** This is not my post, nor my opinion on either product but instead something I thought was worth sharing and have seen both the side effects and the benefits of on other forums. ****

It was the end of my third day at InterZoo 2006 in Nuremberg, GERMANY. Part of my objective for going there was to obtain information regarding fish medications.

I had the opportunity to speak with people in the (large and impressive) Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Inc. (API) booth. I had a long conversation with their Research Project Manager, including new medication packaging, fish medications in general, and some interesting specifics about Melafix and Pimafix.

API makes and packages Melafix and Pimafix. They come in 'industrial strength' and 'regular strength' concentrations. I've used both in my evaluations.

I asked why there was inconsistent results between users and indeed, even in my own applications of these products. These chemicals are 'natural' organic compounds derived from plants.

I was told that it was quite simple. . .These products (Melafix and Pimafix) only kill some kinds of bacteria. I asked if he meant gram negative or positive and the answer was, "No." What he meant was that, irrespective of gram stain results, the bacteria that is thwarted by these products is a finite group (which is mostly unknown).

They know, for instance, that Melafix wipes out mycobacterium and a few others. What about the other bacteria?

They don't know. One aquarist's fish could have a type of bacteria that Melafix will kill, and another aquarist will have bacteria it won't touch. So one aquarist may say, "It works!" and the other says "It doesn't work." Both can be right.

There is a small downside to their use, which shouldn't be cause for general concern, but nonetheless the aquarist should be on the lookout for this situation:

Both Melafix and Pimafix are organic compounds. The bacteria in the tank water (not necessarily the ones on the fish) these products don't kill, sometimes use the Melafix and Pimafix as food! This means that when you add these medications to a tank (especially a tank that has not been maintained well or one that hasn't had regular water changes) there is a small chance that a bacterial bloom will ensue and take up dissolved oxygen. This could mean that you could see, under such circumstances, your fish significantly increase their respiratory rate.

I was told an interesting tidbit. . .The above affect seems to be happening quite often in Italy and API hasn't been able to figure out why, yet.

The fish may seem to be desperately trying to get oxygen and, in effect, they are. This will of course be adding a significant stress factor to an already stressed, sick fish. If the aquarist has any doubt or concern about this, perform an oxygen test before and during the treatment for monitoring purposes.

API has not done much work at trying to figure out all the bacteria that these two compounds are effective against. They don't seem to want to go much further with it. Since aquarists don't know the exact bacteria that is infecting their fish, it might be a moot point whether it was of value knowing what bacteria it was good for, anyway. It IS selling to aquarists!

However, in the professional arena (public and private aquariums, for instance) where scrapings and identification of infections are performed, not knowing whether Melafix and/or Pimafix will treat the bacteria isn't worth the risk. You'll find they don't use these medications.

The concern with an aquarist using these products is that it might not work. When that happens, the bacteria causing the problem can continue to multiply and adversely affect the fish. Most fish should be able to survive a 'mis-treatment' if they are well fed with the proper nutrition.

In such a case where Melafix and/or Pimafix can't kill that particular bacteria, the fish suffers longer by not having been given a successful treatment. Usually, the fish should not expire by this lost time IF the fish is given the correct antibiotic treatment immediately after a failed Melafix/Pimafix treatment.

But if the infection has progressed significantly and/or it has become systemic and/or the fish has stopped eating, I'd still suggest a known likely effects of an antibiotic over the chance that Melafix or Pimafix might work. Under these circumstances, the wrong choice of medication could mean the fish will expire because it couldn't hold out any longer for the effective medication.

Is Melafix and Pimafix reef safe? Yes -- up to a point. I was told that in its proper final reef-tank concentrations, some corals may retract during the treatment period. This doesn't mean the corals are dead. It usually means they have become irritated by this chemical's presence. So far, I have been assured by API that when this occurs, the coral will survive the treatment and come out again after the treatment, without harm. API knew/knows of no other reef concerns. But, like the bacteria issue, API hasn't tested the product on a wide spectrum of corals, invertebrates, and marine life.

The bottom line is that no aquarist should leap to the conclusion that Melafix and/or Pimafix will or won't cure the fish. No one should promote its use NOR dissuade someone from using them. All anyone can say is that it did or didn't work for them AND they should direct the inquirer to this post so that the aquarist can make up their own mind whether to try it or not.

This post provides current facts of Melafix and Pimafix's sometimes successful use, from the manufacturer's knowledge and experience, so that the aquarist can make an informed decision. Let's try to be level headed. Inquiring aquarists want to know!

Even an aquarist who has had success with the product might find that the next time their fish is infected, the product won't work. This would mean that this next infection was of the bacteria that Melafix and Pimafix can't kill or failed to kill during the last treatment. Regarding this possibility, keep in mind that if it was successfully used once, the bacteria it kills are gone and only 'the other ones' are hanging around. So it would make sense that the next time, there might be a lesser chance of it working.

I asked if there might be strains resistant to the products and so far none have been reported to API. If it is the type of bacteria that it kills, it will kill it. If it not the kind of bacteria it kills, it will leave it alone (or rarely, provide food for the bacteria to live on and further multiply).

I hope this helps those who wonder if Melafix and/or Pimafix will work!

Now to a second feature. . .It seems that in higher concentrations, Melafix is useful to clear up and/or stop tissue degeneration of many corals. Julian Sprung tells how to use this in a dip/bath method in his.

Both these products have no effect on parasites, viruses, and fungi. Just to be clear, these products have no effect on Marine Ich and Marine Velvet.

Source: leebca @reefsancfuary

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I did a lot of reading and ran into a very interesting post on these two from 2008. As I cannot link to another forum, I'll paste the post here.

**** This is not my post, nor my opinion on either product but instead something I thought was worth sharing and have seen both the side effects and the benefits of on other forums. ****

It was the end of my third day at InterZoo 2006 in Nuremberg, GERMANY. Part of my objective for going there was to obtain information regarding fish medications.

I had the opportunity to speak with people in the (large and impressive) Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Inc. (API) booth. I had a long conversation with their Research Project Manager, including new medication packaging, fish medications in general, and some interesting specifics about Melafix and Pimafix.

API makes and packages Melafix and Pimafix. They come in 'industrial strength' and 'regular strength' concentrations. I've used both in my evaluations.

I asked why there was inconsistent results between users and indeed, even in my own applications of these products. These chemicals are 'natural' organic compounds derived from plants.

I was told that it was quite simple. . .These products (Melafix and Pimafix) only kill some kinds of bacteria. I asked if he meant gram negative or positive and the answer was, "No." What he meant was that, irrespective of gram stain results, the bacteria that is thwarted by these products is a finite group (which is mostly unknown).

They know, for instance, that Melafix wipes out mycobacterium and a few others. What about the other bacteria?

They don't know. One aquarist's fish could have a type of bacteria that Melafix will kill, and another aquarist will have bacteria it won't touch. So one aquarist may say, "It works!" and the other says "It doesn't work." Both can be right.

There is a small downside to their use, which shouldn't be cause for general concern, but nonetheless the aquarist should be on the lookout for this situation:

Both Melafix and Pimafix are organic compounds. The bacteria in the tank water (not necessarily the ones on the fish) these products don't kill, sometimes use the Melafix and Pimafix as food! This means that when you add these medications to a tank (especially a tank that has not been maintained well or one that hasn't had regular water changes) there is a small chance that a bacterial bloom will ensue and take up dissolved oxygen. This could mean that you could see, under such circumstances, your fish significantly increase their respiratory rate.

I was told an interesting tidbit. . .The above affect seems to be happening quite often in Italy and API hasn't been able to figure out why, yet.

The fish may seem to be desperately trying to get oxygen and, in effect, they are. This will of course be adding a significant stress factor to an already stressed, sick fish. If the aquarist has any doubt or concern about this, perform an oxygen test before and during the treatment for monitoring purposes.

API has not done much work at trying to figure out all the bacteria that these two compounds are effective against. They don't seem to want to go much further with it. Since aquarists don't know the exact bacteria that is infecting their fish, it might be a moot point whether it was of value knowing what bacteria it was good for, anyway. It IS selling to aquarists!

However, in the professional arena (public and private aquariums, for instance) where scrapings and identification of infections are performed, not knowing whether Melafix and/or Pimafix will treat the bacteria isn't worth the risk. You'll find they don't use these medications.

The concern with an aquarist using these products is that it might not work. When that happens, the bacteria causing the problem can continue to multiply and adversely affect the fish. Most fish should be able to survive a 'mis-treatment' if they are well fed with the proper nutrition.

In such a case where Melafix and/or Pimafix can't kill that particular bacteria, the fish suffers longer by not having been given a successful treatment. Usually, the fish should not expire by this lost time IF the fish is given the correct antibiotic treatment immediately after a failed Melafix/Pimafix treatment.

But if the infection has progressed significantly and/or it has become systemic and/or the fish has stopped eating, I'd still suggest a known likely effects of an antibiotic over the chance that Melafix or Pimafix might work. Under these circumstances, the wrong choice of medication could mean the fish will expire because it couldn't hold out any longer for the effective medication.

Is Melafix and Pimafix reef safe? Yes -- up to a point. I was told that in its proper final reef-tank concentrations, some corals may retract during the treatment period. This doesn't mean the corals are dead. It usually means they have become irritated by this chemical's presence. So far, I have been assured by API that when this occurs, the coral will survive the treatment and come out again after the treatment, without harm. API knew/knows of no other reef concerns. But, like the bacteria issue, API hasn't tested the product on a wide spectrum of corals, invertebrates, and marine life.

The bottom line is that no aquarist should leap to the conclusion that Melafix and/or Pimafix will or won't cure the fish. No one should promote its use NOR dissuade someone from using them. All anyone can say is that it did or didn't work for them AND they should direct the inquirer to this post so that the aquarist can make up their own mind whether to try it or not.

This post provides current facts of Melafix and Pimafix's sometimes successful use, from the manufacturer's knowledge and experience, so that the aquarist can make an informed decision. Let's try to be level headed. Inquiring aquarists want to know!

Even an aquarist who has had success with the product might find that the next time their fish is infected, the product won't work. This would mean that this next infection was of the bacteria that Melafix and Pimafix can't kill or failed to kill during the last treatment. Regarding this possibility, keep in mind that if it was successfully used once, the bacteria it kills are gone and only 'the other ones' are hanging around. So it would make sense that the next time, there might be a lesser chance of it working.

I asked if there might be strains resistant to the products and so far none have been reported to API. If it is the type of bacteria that it kills, it will kill it. If it not the kind of bacteria it kills, it will leave it alone (or rarely, provide food for the bacteria to live on and further multiply).

I hope this helps those who wonder if Melafix and/or Pimafix will work!

Now to a second feature. . .It seems that in higher concentrations, Melafix is useful to clear up and/or stop tissue degeneration of many corals. Julian Sprung tells how to use this in a dip/bath method in his.

Both these products have no effect on parasites, viruses, and fungi. Just to be clear, these products have no effect on Marine Ich and Marine Velvet.

Source: leebca @reefsancfuary

Thanks Cat. I read this also. It was one of the articles that inspired this thread.

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Thanks guys,

This is really good feedback!

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I do not really use it as treatment of "disease".

Instead I use it as replacement for salt in skin-treatment of my fish with recurring dropsy, since I don't feel comfortable exposing them to salt. Always worked perfectly. :)

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As a mostly practical person, this is how I choose whether to use/recommend Melafix or not.

- If it's something I do not need to treat, I do extra WCs

- If it's something that requires my wanting to treat, I use salt. If salt is not an option (in the case of dropsied fish), I will consider either a med or Melafix

- If the meds I have at hand (or can acquire) is not appropriate or not available, I will consider Melafix.

As I said before, there is no question that tea tree oil works. What is a sticking point for me is whether the amount contained in Melafix, or the protocol recommended by API, actually works. There is no reliable data one way or another, and all we are left with are anecdotes and hopes. Given that that's the case, I will always choose something that has better risk profile in my mind.

It's not about not giving this med a chance, but about giving the fish a better chance, as the reef person pointed out. :)

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Lots of really good information in this thread!

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Chai you can as long as it pertaining to the thread and is good information :)

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