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What else can I feed my fish besides flake food? ��


Mr. Fishy

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You could start with things you have as part of your families meals. Our fish receives a small bit of white every time I make a boiled egg, a boiled pea or piece of bean or carrot from your dinner. As long as you take the food before it has been coated in butter, oil, fat or salt (warmed up a bit from the can or fresh or frozen package), most veggies are loved by goldies. Just check the packaging to make sure that nothing has been added before you get to it.

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Please try not to feed your goldfish flakes. There are many reasons why not to, and here are some:

1) they float on the surface of the water, and when the goldfish go to eat it, they gulp some air along with it and it may affect their swim bladder equilibrium.

2) They are very very thin. Once they hit water they begin leeching out their vitamins, your goldfish may not be getting all the nutrients they need with flakes.

3) They swell when soaked, meaning, once the goldfish eats it, it may expand in their intestines and cause digestive upset.

4) Flakes are just bad in general. In most big-brand commercial flakes, the ingredients aren't that great and are full of preservatives.

These points should be taken into consideration with ALL goldfish, especially fancies, their compact bodies put them even higher at risk for floatiness and general swim bladder problems. What kind of fish do you have?

Try and get some high quality pellets from the pet store. If you live by a Petco, they carry Omega One and New Life Spectrum pellet foods, they both very good foods for goldfish.

I also noticed you are new to the forum, so welcome! :hi If you're new to goldfish, please don't hesitate to ask more questions!

Edited by Georgia
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I also feed my goldies Chinese veggies, specifically bok choi (in Cantonese) or bai cai (in Mandarin). I learned this from Tithra's video. I microwave a clean leaf with some water in a bowl for 1 minute, clip it wiht a plastic clip that has a suction cup and attach it to the tank glass. After about 1 day and a half I remove what is left, any longer and the leaf breaks apart and makes a big mess.

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I currently feed my fish a very varied diet with Cobalt Goldfish Flakes as the staple.

Weekdays:

Breakfast- Cobalt Flakes or tiny bite size pieces of Algae Wafers and Spirulina Pellets

Lunch- Frozen Blood Worms or Mysis shrimp

Pre-Dinner- Cobalt Flakes and Spirulina Pellets

Supper- Usually Peas

On weekends they have a Post Breakfast meal of Wardley Tropical fish flakes and a Mid Day Lunch (about noon not 2) of algae wafer. They have a layer of duckweed on the surface and a couple of plants to pick at throughout the day

ALWAYS wiggle flakes under the water and poke them down so they sink, use high quality flakes only (don't use something like Tetra). If it's sold at Walmart and chain pet stores, it's probably not the best, Hikari is debatable. Make sure to give a varied diet, don't feed the same thing over and over again, it's boring. Also feed meatier food like worms more to mi-day and veggies at night, it's been best for me. Pellets are better than flakes but they need pre-soaked so IMO it's similar vitamin loss to flakes.

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my two Ryukins love dried Gammarus fossarum :)

I'm sure they love it, but I would recommend that you move away from anything freeze dried, especially with this breed of goldfish. This is a recipe for floaty issues down the road.

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I got some frozen brine shrimp to feed them today so no more flakes

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Will you be feeding other things besides the frozen (not freeze dried, right?) brine shrimp? Brine shrimp alone is not enough variance in diet.

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Brine shrimp alone is not enough variance in diet.

Just out of curiosity, do we know that this is true? I am curious.

As you know, I feed my fish more variety than most people here :rofl (except Jared), but I do this more because I want to, not because I have to.

I do agree that some variety is good, but the question remains, do we really know that brine alone is not sufficient? Thanks.

Edited by dnalex
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Brine shrimp alone is not enough variance in diet.

Just out of curiosity, do we know that this is true? I am curious.

We know that brine shrimp do not contain any more plant matter than they ate in life, which goldfish need due to being mainly herbivorous. We also know that adult brine shrimp, like the frozen ones, are low in nutrition in comparison to many other foods we feed our fish. Even in our commercial pellets the fish receives a variable buffet of nutrients from many different sources.

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Brine shrimp alone is not enough variance in diet.

Just out of curiosity, do we know that this is true? I am curious.

We know that brine shrimp do not contain any more plant matter than they ate in life, which goldfish need due to being mainly herbivorous. We also know that adult brine shrimp, like the frozen ones, are low in nutrition in comparison to many other foods we feed our fish. Even in our commercial pellets the fish receives a variable buffet of nutrients from many different sources.

There are several comments I need to make here.

1. Goldfish are NOT mainly herbivorous. In fact, they are not herbivorous at all. The diet of goldfish consists of diatoms, green algae, blue-green algae, and then zooplanktons. They will eat what is availed to them, but that is far from them being herbivorous. That's like saying cats are omnimores.

2. Secondly, I'm not sure where you get that these brine shrimp are low in nutrition. They are certainly nutritious enough for many many breeders to feed their young (translates to need to grow) goldfish.

3. Again we are back to this idea that somehow a varying diet is needed. There is no indication that nutrients from many different sources are required. If there are, I would like to see it. There is definitely the requirement that the goldfish has to get enough nutrients, and while I don't know that I would bet that brine shrimp is enough to sustain goldfish in long term, my issue here is that we don't quite know that (do we?) to make such an assertive statement that they are not enough.

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Brine shrimp alone is not enough variance in diet.

Just out of curiosity, do we know that this is true? I am curious.

We know that brine shrimp do not contain any more plant matter than they ate in life, which goldfish need due to being mainly herbivorous. We also know that adult brine shrimp, like the frozen ones, are low in nutrition in comparison to many other foods we feed our fish. Even in our commercial pellets the fish receives a variable buffet of nutrients from many different sources.

There are several comments I need to make here.

1. Goldfish are NOT mainly herbivorous. In fact, they are not herbivorous at all. The diet of goldfish consists of diatoms, green algae, blue-green algae, and then zooplanktons. They will eat what is availed to them, but that is far from them being herbivorous. That's like saying cats are omnimores.

2. Secondly, I'm not sure where you get that these brine shrimp are low in nutrition. They are certainly nutritious enough for many many breeders to feed their young (translates to need to grow) goldfish.

3. Again we are back to this idea that somehow a varying diet is needed. There is no indication that nutrients from many different sources are required. If there are, I would like to see it. There is definitely the requirement that the goldfish has to get enough nutrients, and while I don't know that I would bet that brine shrimp is enough to sustain goldfish in long term, my issue here is that we don't quite know that (do we?) to make such an assertive statement that they are not enough.

1. Algae is plant matter. This is where I get the idea that they are mainly herbivorous. If I said they were completely herbivorous, I would be lying. :( They will eat what is available, but so would any animal in need of sustenance. That being said, their bodies react much better to plant foods than animal ones.

2. Baby brine shrimp are more nutrient dense than their adult versions. That is why I specifically mentioned adult shrimp.

3. If they were enough to be the only nutrient source, goldfish would not have such a varied diet in pond environments, and neither would their carp counterparts in the wild. This is the same with many 'pet' animals, and why we offer them a varied diet in our homes.

Edited by ChelseaM
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1. Algae is plant matter. This is where I get the idea that they are mainly herbivorous. If I said they were completely herbivorous, I would be lying. :( They will eat what is available, but so would any animal in need of sustenance. That being said, their bodies react much better to plant foods than animal ones.

False. Algae, especially the 60%+ diatoms that make up the goldfish diet in the wild, are not plants.

Where do you get that their bodies react much better than animal ones? For me at least, it's the fibrous nature of the plants that help moving things along, but it's also not required. All 14 of my goldfish have been going for MONTHS without actual plant material, and NONE OF THEM are floaty. There is actually more data that fish have more problems processing plants (especially terrestrial ones) than proteins.

2. Baby brine shrimp are more nutrient dense than their adult versions. That is why I specifically mentioned adult shrimp.

True, unless you buy frozen, and they are now gut loaded.

3. If they were enough to be the only nutrient source, goldfish would not have such a varied diet in pond environments, and neither would their carp counterparts in the wild. This is the same with many 'pet' animals, and why we offer them a varied diet in our homes.

This argument doesn't make sense. In the wild, it's not their main diet because it's not abundant enough in that amount. As you and I have both said, they will eat what is available. Just because something is not abundant enough to make it a staple food does not mean that it cannot be a staple food when supply is no longer an issue.

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I want to make it clear that I, like Chelsea, do not recommend that brine shrimp be the sole staple. I just did not think that we hand quite enough to say that they can't be sufficient.

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1. Algae is plant matter. This is where I get the idea that they are mainly herbivorous. If I said they were completely herbivorous, I would be lying. :( They will eat what is available, but so would any animal in need of sustenance. That being said, their bodies react much better to plant foods than animal ones.

False. Algae, especially the 60%+ diatoms that make up the goldfish diet in the wild, are not plants.

Where do you get that their bodies react much better than animal ones? For me at least, it's the fibrous nature of the plants that help moving things along, but it's also not required. All 14 of my goldfish have been going for MONTHS without actual plant material, and NONE OF THEM are floaty. There is actually more data that fish have more problems processing plants (especially terrestrial ones) than proteins.

I get that from watching mine and others' fish eat lots of animal matter and then exhibit unhealthy behaviors such as floating, lethargy or constipation. Unless you have been feeding the fish straight animal proteins as their diet and not allowing them to munch on plants in the tank, then they most likely have been getting plant matter, right? I apologize if I have insinuated that the matter has to come as a fresh plant.

2. Baby brine shrimp are more nutrient dense than their adult versions. That is why I specifically mentioned adult shrimp.

True, unless you buy frozen, and they are now gut loaded.

I have not seen any FBS in any LFS around me that say they are gut loaded, though I haven't been looking. Anything I have seen says very little in the way of ingredients.

3. If they were enough to be the only nutrient source, goldfish would not have such a varied diet in pond environments, and neither would their carp counterparts in the wild. This is the same with many 'pet' animals, and why we offer them a varied diet in our homes.

This argument doesn't make sense. In the wild, it's not their main diet because it's not abundant enough in that amount. As you and I have both said, they will eat what is available. Just because something is not abundant enough to make it a staple food does not mean that it cannot be a staple food when supply is no longer an issue.

I guess what I am trying to convey is that a staple diet should be dense in the nutrients the animal truly needs. I do not believe brine shrimp contain all necessary nutrients a goldfish needs to continue thriving. In the 'wild' of our ponds, they have access to enough of a single organism to sustain them, though they don't just eat that one organism alone.

Hahaha Alex I know you aren't. I am just trying to provide a logical argument to defend my position, as always. It's a good way to learn new stuff. :)

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blanched dandelion leaves are full of lutein-green-yellow color enhancer. daphnia and brine shrimp gut loaded with spirulina. marigold petals and spirulina have zeaxanthin-yellow orange and red color enhancer,without impacting white. foods containing dl-methionine-for wen growth.kens earthworm sticks.spinach is good in moderation,too much impairs kidney function.fresh salmon and shrimp-omega 3. bloodworms and duckweed are my staples.i have problems growing enough duckweed for them and have resorted to growing it out in my other 3 tanks,just to supply their "habit".

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