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greenorchid

NEED ADVICE PLEASE*** thanks*

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Good luck! Let us know how goes! :)

So what is the best cure for fin rot? Triple sulfa , Melafix , or Metro Meds? The metromeds I have doesn't say it's used for fin rot...... I'm considering starting a treatment for the girls because I'm afraid she may lose her pelvic fins.

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I also read that fish that show sensitivity to high usage of salt will be very sensitive to meds.

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Good luck! Let us know how goes! :)

If I put the girls in the sterilite tub with my 70 gallon filter from my 55 - remove filter media and place in 55 tank and use new sponge and put filter in sterilite tub - then I can safely use triple sulfa - right? or should I use metro meds?

The only thing that concerns me in the pic is the redness in the pectoral fin. The black will go away.

Do you have MMs on the way or not?

If this was my fish I would:

Put her on a course of MMs (most likely 14 days) and do a couple of rounds of prazi while on the MMs. Salt is not needed when the fish is on MMs. Is she eating? :idont

If I put the girls in the sterilite tub with my 70 gallon filter from my 55 - remove filter media and place in 55 tank and use new sponge and put filter in sterilite tub - then I can safely use triple sulfa - right? or should I use metro meds?

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The best treatment for fin rot is pristine water. Sometimes salt will be used.

I don't think your fish have been exposed to high usage of salt, either high % or an extended period . . .

Why do you think she will lose her pelvic fins? :idont

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The best treatment for fin rot is pristine water. Sometimes salt will be used.

I don't think your fish have been exposed to high usage of salt, either high % or an extended period . . .

Why do you think she will lose her pelvic fins? :idont

Because they look like this now......

IMG_2746_zps3fdbb15f.jpg

IMG_2747_zps61f6e1bb.jpg

I feel like theyre getting smaller by the hour....

They're like bloody nubs

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I can tell you this...when those fins get eaten to the very end, that will be the end as well. :(

I am sorry, but I am just not comfortable making any suggestions besides clean water at this point, because the suggestions pointed out get blamed to make things worse.

You have also just said that you read somewhere that fish that are sensitive to salt are sensitive to meds. While I don't believe that, and have never had such experience, I will not try to dispute you. What results is that we are now at an impossible juncture. There is a hesitance to treat, and there is definitely dangerous worsening of conditions. :(

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The best treatment for fin rot is pristine water. Sometimes salt will be used.

I don't think your fish have been exposed to high usage of salt, either high % or an extended period . . .

Why do you think she will lose her pelvic fins? :idont

Because they look like this now......

IMG_2746_zps3fdbb15f.jpg

IMG_2747_zps61f6e1bb.jpg

I feel like theyre getting smaller by the hour....

They're like bloody nubs

Update:

Ginger's dorsal fin is up and she is swimming*

Eunice's nubs are much less red , starting to turn white again and she's still swimming - she's very lively and likes to make dips and turns so I had to remove most of my river rocks so she doesn't get stuck - like she did a few times - but everyone is eating and the tank divider is working so far. I'm staying positive - things seem better today than yesterday.

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I can tell you this...when those fins get eaten to the very end, that will be the end as well. :(

I am sorry, but I am just not comfortable making any suggestions besides clean water at this point, because the suggestions pointed out get blamed to make things worse.

You have also just said that you read somewhere that fish that are sensitive to salt are sensitive to meds. While I don't believe that, and have never had such experience, I will not try to dispute you. What results is that we are now at an impossible juncture. There is a hesitance to treat, and there is definitely dangerous worsening of conditions. :(

update above

oh and her belly underneath by her pelvic fins is totally white today - no more red*

Edited by greenorchid

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Fantastic! As I said, we will make suggestions based on what you would like to do.

Fins crossed! :)

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Fantastic! As I said, we will make suggestions based on what you would like to do.

Fins crossed! :)

Check out these pics!!!!!! Her burns are healing* :carrot:
IMG_2812_zps61ed001b.jpg
IMG_2813_zpsfe1a1a42.jpg
IMG_2816_zpsda41ccbb.jpg
IMG_2810_zpsef3c47c5.jpg

The best treatment for fin rot is pristine water. Sometimes salt will be used.

I don't think your fish have been exposed to high usage of salt, either high % or an extended period . . .

Why do you think she will lose her pelvic fins? :idont

She's improving*

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I'm not sure why you say they are burns, because they are not.

But as I said, it's your diagnosis.

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Big picture - She's getting better* :)

Wasn't making jabs - just happy my fish is happier - thought you'd be happy to see her improvement - thats all.

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I'm not concerned about jabs, but more about what needs to be done to help the fish.

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:D

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:D

Today's update:

Both my ryukins have black tipped pelvic fins and on the under part of their tail - so I pretty sure that means they're healing more* :) - just finished a big WC too*

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:D

Hi koko

I remember you questioning if there was metal in my stones in my tank ---- I am using a tank divider now - the aqueon one. it clips on to the top side of my tank with this long paper clip looking thingy that I noticed is rusting a bit now. Should I be concerned about this? Thanks*

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Well yup,

any kind of rust going into the tank can harm them even kill them :o

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Well yup,

any kind of rust going into the tank can harm them even kill them :o

oh my goodness - thank you ......... i have to think of a way to use this divider now without the clips..

Why would a fish company make something for a fish tank that's dangerous to them... ugh.

So should I also do a WC tomorrow morn? Thanks*

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I just took the clips off and I'm trying to figure out a way to support this. Before I saw your response I read this on line and stopped worrying. But now I'll do a water change when I wake up tomorrow. Thank you

If it's a pure iron nail, I don't think it would. Rust = iron oxide. Plant fertilizer has iron in it and is safe for fish. I suppose if you dumped a bunch of nails in it might overdose things, but I doubt dropping a nail in your tank would kill things off.

The old-school way of adding iron supplementation was burying iron nails in the gravel of planted tanks lol...also, as mentioned, driftwood is mostly held on with screws.

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Metal

Symptoms: General illness symptoms, falshing, gasping, reddened gills, erratic swimming. Depending on the metal involved, confusion can set in without other symptoms being obvious.

Cause(s): There are many ways metal can enter the pond. Water from corroded pipes, improper decorations or equipment, nails, screws, coins, and even some medications which contain metallic compounds such as Copper Sulfate.

Generally, fish can handle only the smallest trace amounts of certain metals in the water. Metals bind to gills and other tissues, effectively stopping proper functioning. One or more organs can become affected at a time. Iron seems to affect the primarily the gills, lead the nervous system, and copper can affect the whole body, especially the liver.

To further guard against introducing metals into the tank, make sure that everything you use in and to do with the pond is metal free and in good condition. Plants and rocks from polluted sites may contain metal contaminants. Old equipment may degrade and release metals into the water. For example, cheap nets can develop rust which will be introduced into the water every time you use it

Metals can accumulate in the organs of aquatic life, causing a variety of physiological problems, ultimately leading to disease outbreaks and death. High levels of one or more of these heavy metals cause rapid death of fish and amphibians without obvious symptoms of disease or tissue damage.

Safe Metal Limits:

Copper 0.014mg/l More toxic in soft water

Zinc exacerbates toxicity

Combined both are dangerous

Zinc 0.01mg/l Synergistic with copper

0.15mg/l In hard Water

Cadmium 0.03mg/l

Chromium 0.10mg/l

Lead 0.01mg/l In soft Water

4.00mg/l In hard Water

Silver 0.03mg/l

copper continous: <.006mg/l

fish kill: >0.3.7mg/l in soft water, >.6-6.4mg/l in hard water

iron continous: <.1mg/l

fish kill: >0.5mg/l

magnesium continous: <0.01mg/l

fish kill: >75mg/l

lead continous: <0.02mg/l

fish kill: >1.0-31.5mg/l

Copper is the most poisonous of the bunch.

Although Copper is used in marine fish medicine quite frequently, in fresh water it's a different story. Copper accumulates in the fish's systems and is toxic at most any level in fresh water.

Even the lowest levels of Copper cause toxic changes in the fishes nervous system, gills, liver, kidneys, and the immune system. Fish exposed to copper over an extended period of time become dull, darkened and lethargic. At this initial stage of copper toxicity, gill lesions consist of the blunting of the gill lamella (significantly reducing the hemoglobin/O2 exchange). The gill filaments initially become severely hyperplasic (huge mucus buildups) and evolve to severe capillary congestion (telaglactisis) With continued exposure the fish become indifferent to any form of external stimuli -- the fish is basically suffocating to death.

I found this on line - thanks for letting me know! - I did a water change this morning.

Ginger broke free.....still trying to find another way to support the top of the divider.

I'm so shocked a fish company would make something that could harm fish ! - thanks again*

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I just used a needle and thread and sewed through the top edge and taped string to the top edge of tank - works great - my fishies thank you*

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Suction cups are also an alternative. Just run that thread through the hole of a suction cup and you'll be fine. I also wonder why the company would even think of adding metal parts...

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Suction cups are also an alternative. Just run that thread through the hole of a suction cup and you'll be fine. I also wonder why the company would even think of adding metal parts...

:idont

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the screws used for driftwood are galvanized.they will not rust.

I recently had issues with my brand new (got it in late December) galvanized stock tank losing its coating after an air stone was run on the bottom of it. I'm not sure of galvanized metals anymore after that. I could just be paranoid though.

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