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Tiny Brown Worms


Balaylee

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I turned my filter off to do my water change. When I went to turn it back on when I was done tons of tiny wriggling brown worms shot out of my filter all over the tank. I was horrified. Obviously my fish started eating them which caused me to walk away from disgust. I just wanna know if these are harmful or not. I started treating my fish for flukes today. Those couldn't be worms related to flukes could they? I wont be able to get any pictures because they are too small.

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Probably just oligochaeta (segmented worm like an earthworm). Harmless and eat detritus. I bet they are all up in your substrate. As long as there is something organic breaking down you will have them. Likely introduced into your tank through live plants.

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Probably just oligochaeta (segmented worm like an earthworm).? Harmless and eat detritus.? I bet they are all up in your substrate.? As long as there?is something?organic breaking down you will have?them.? Likely introduced into your tank through live plants.?

Or nematodes

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Probably just oligochaeta (segmented worm like an earthworm).? Harmless and eat detritus.? I bet they are all up in your substrate.? As long as there?is something?organic breaking down you will have?them.? Likely introduced into your tank through live plants.?

Or nematodes
I thought they where white.?

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

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Some things don't come in a rainbow of colors. I did not know they came in others. I was just under the impression the little white stringy worms you sometimes see if you overfees was them.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

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Some things don't come in a rainbow of colors. I did not know they came in others. I was just under the impression the little white stringy worms you sometimes see if you overfees was them.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

Considering that both nematodes and oligochaetes are a phylum and a sub-phylum in the animal kingdom that comprise tens of thousands of species (15,000+ for roundworms, and 4000+ for oligos), it stands to reason that they will come in a variety of colors. Perhaps not bright pink or purple, but then again, I wouldn't count that out either. :)

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Some things don't come in a rainbow of colors. I did not know they came in others. I was just under the impression the little white stringy worms you sometimes see if you overfees was them.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

Considering that both nematodes and oligochaetes are a phylum and a sub-phylum in the animal kingdom that comprise tens of thousands of species (15,000+ for roundworms, and 4000+ for oligos), it stands to reason that they will come in a variety of colors. Perhaps not bright pink or purple, but then again, I wouldn't count that out either. :)

I thought nematode was a species name not large encompassing categories of species. That was because when I ask what they where when I got what I had that was the answer given.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

Edited by Daniel E.
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I (and sometimes my best friend Google :rofl) am always happy to try to provide an answer, if I am able. It's not a problem. :)

I think this just goes to highlight there while the internet is such an amazing learning resource, it's rife with contradictions, inconsistencies, and inaccuracies.

There was a time when someone really pushed the idea that these worms are oligochaetes, and they may very well could be, but they just didn't have enough information to go out on such a limb. Yet, they did it anyway.

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I (and sometimes my best friend Google :rofl) am always happy to try to provide an answer, if I am able. It's not a problem. :)

I think this just goes to highlight there while the internet is such an amazing learning resource, it's rife with contradictions, inconsistencies, and inaccuracies.

There was a time when someone really pushed the idea that these worms are oligochaetes, and they may very well could be, but they just didn't have enough information to go out on such a limb. Yet, they did it anyway.

The reason why I mentioned oligochaeta is because in my experience the little red ones that thrive in aquaria thriving in substrate and in filtration happen to be segmented. Nematodes are smooth skinned. Don't rule out either one until you put that little critter under a microscope.

Check the top inch of your substrate that is pushed up against the glass. Do you see little red dudes? Are there little translucent tubes they seem to be living in? If this is the case you have oligochaeta. Which are indeed harmless and likely helping you out. They are there because there is organic matter that they are aiding in breaking down. Just a piece of biodiversity that come with adding live plants to your tank.

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Even without seeing them, I would guess insect larvae. Some bug laid eggs in your filter. Fish love insect larvae, whether they be bloodworms (which are not worms), mosquito larvae, fly larvae or whatever.

Planaria look like this, they are flat and most often are seen gliding on a surface.

http://raven.islandwood.org/kids/stream_health/Images/planarian2.jpg

Nematodes look like this, with a smooth surface of uniform thickness.

http://www.oscarfish.com/images/stories/Wiki/2-nematodes.jpg

https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ44pose4_xc7opMVs8ueKgGHUpSB-phcNvoYdMc_kbWN5A99hs

Aquatic oligochaetes may be the skinny red aquatic earthworms,

http://www.ecospark.ca/sites/default/files/currents/images/AquaticEarthworm.jpg

or may be microscopic or near microscopic worms like this:

These little worms are one of the things you see if you look at a scraping from an aquarium or filter. They are really ugly, but perfectly harmless eaters of debris and bacteria.

Edited by shakaho
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Would prazi kill these things?

Not really. Prazi is mostly effective against flatworms (Cestodes) and doesn't really do much against roundworms or annelids. It won't do much to insect larvae.

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Hot linking.... its not allowing hot linking :(

?

What is hot linking?

I actually have no idea, but when I click on the link you provided, it says hot linking not permitted.

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I assume the other links work? I did them all the same way. I tried to just put the pictures in the post, they all appeared on my draft, but it wouldn't post. Maybe all my redoing messed something up.

Does this work? http://www.oscarfish.com/article-home/healthdisease/122-worms-in-tank.html

The picture is in this article.

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Hot linking.... its not allowing hot linking :(

What is hot linking?

I actually have no idea, but when I click on the link you provided, it says hot linking not permitted.

http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotlinking

Linking to photos that are not allowed to be shared on other site (images)... I dont allow hotlinking either... meaning photos on Kg arent allowed to be linked to else where.

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