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Very Cold Tap Water?

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I normally do 2/3 water changes weekly on my 45 (US) gallon tank. It houses two ~3 inch goldfish.

Since moving into a new place this summer, I have brought a water hose through the nearby bathroom window to replace the water I've removed using buckets. (At the previous house, I used reservoir tubs to ensure exact temperature matches, but here there is NO SPACE.)

The water hose method works out well: I add a capful of Prime (capful is for 50 gallons), and fill the tank up slowly, because I cannot control the tap temperature of the hose.

The temperature of the tap has seldom been more than 5 degrees Fahrenheit away from the tank temperature (which I allow to fluctuate with the seasonal room temperature of 65-75 degrees). Since the water comes in so slowly, and the difference isn't great, the change is not jolting to the fish.

My problem:

Lately, it has been VERY COLD. The tap water is around 40 or 50 degrees F, and the tank is around 65-68 degrees.

For the past 3 weeks, I have been filling the tank up EXTRA SLOWLY, and replacing about 1/3 to 1/2 of the water. I have been also been fasting the fish every 3rd day.

But is that okay? The water quality remains around 10 ppm nitrates before each change (I have moss balls), just like when I was changing 2/3 of the water weekly.

What is the best thing to do in this situation?

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Is the water hose you are using connected to a cold water tap only…like an outside faucet? If not, could you turn on the hot and the cold and get the temperature close then turn them off…attach your hose…and turn it back on to the same temperature that you liked before you attached the hose? Am I making any sense??? Hope that helps!! Good luck!

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I have always adjusted the tap temperature to match the tank. It's not been a problem ever. :)

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It says "brought a water hose in through a nearby window so I am assuming it is an outside tap. How about filling a 5 gallon bucket with hot water from an inside tap and mixing it in with the cold?

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Is the water hose you are using connected to a cold water tap only…like an outside faucet? If not, could you turn on the hot and the cold and get the temperature close then turn them off…attach your hose…and turn it back on to the same temperature that you liked before you attached the hose? Am I making any sense??? Hope that helps!! Good luck!

Yes, it IS an outside tap! There's no way to change the temperature on this outside tap. The temperature is whatever the ambient temperature is; it is NOT connected to any water heater.

And the hose will not connect to an inside tap (where I would be able to change the temperature). I have already bought and tried 2 different connectors, and they did not fit to the sink faucet.

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It says "brought a water hose in through a nearby window so I am assuming it is an outside tap. How about filling a 5 gallon bucket with hot water from an inside tap and mixing it in with the cold?

What would be the best time to dump in the hot water? When the tank's halfway refilled with cold?

I have considered this before but I worried about making even more potentially shocking temp-changes, like if a fish is in the path of the dumped in water.

Both fish seem to get a kick out of riding the moving water and position themselves below the stream on purpose.

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There is no access to an inside tap?

A huge, fast, drop in temperature can be really problematic, and it can even lead to dropsy, so this is something to be avoided.

If you were to do something like DP suggested, then you will need to monitor your tank temp and add so that the temp does not go over or under by 3 degrees each way.

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There is no access to an inside tap?

There's a shower stall, a little sink, and a kitchen sink 20 or 30 feet away. Upstairs is a bathtub faucet, the only feasible way to fill the 3 gallon bucket.

CONCEIVABLE OPTIONS:

1) Weekly 2/3 water change: I could pour in quite hot CUPS of water from the bathroom sink while cold water is dribbling in from the garden hose? While watching the thermometer closely?

2) Bi- or tri-weekly 1/4 (or smaller) water change: Dribbling in cold water from garden hose, watching thermometer closely?

3) And after Christmas, I could buy a Python, and control the temperature from then on. How compatible are they with bathroom sink taps?

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3 is of course best, because it will save you time. They should be compatible, or you can get adapters for this at Home Depot or another hardware store. :)

I like 2 better than one, but 1 may be more pratical/doable. :)

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I can't attach my python to any of my indoor taps either, at least not any that will reach the tank. So I use the outside one as well. If there is a notable difference, which usually only happens in Summer, I run the water very slowly so the temperature creeps up really slowly rather than quickly getting warmer. Most of the time it's within 1-3 degrees of my tank temp though

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I do something similar - many times most of the year. I take the fish and the snails out of the tank and place them in a sterlite container with a couple of buckets of tank water. Empty the tank. Fill the tank with the cold water hose. Add a bucket or two of warm/hot water. Let it all sit for 30-60 minutes with filter running and lights on.

Then, I add the prime, the fish and the snails back in the tank.

This is my routine for my 'large' changes (every 2 weeks). The weekly change is 50% with buckets (water is removed with a pond pump out an open window) and refilled with buckets.

I would love a python but my 1880 house with WWII plumping presents some challenges.

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I do something similar - many times most of the year. I take the fish and the snails out of the tank and place them in a sterlite container with a couple of buckets of tank water. Empty the tank. Fill the tank with the cold water hose. Add a bucket or two of warm/hot water. Let it all sit for 30-60 minutes with filter running and lights on.

Then, I add the prime, the fish and the snails back in the tank.

This is my routine for my 'large' changes (every 2 weeks). The weekly change is 50% with buckets (water is removed with a pond pump out an open window) and refilled with buckets.

I would love a python but my 1880 house with WWII plumping presents some challenges.

This seems like a great option! It would give you time to tinker with the temperature without affecting your fish!

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At my house the water only flows hot for about 5 minutes, then it turns cold. This happens when I am pumping a large amount of water over a period of time, such as in the bath. I imagine it would also happen if I were using a Python, since it would be a continuous flow rather than the short, small bursts of water it takes for me to fill one 2.5 gal bucket at a time.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Edited by *Amanda*

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A python uses the same type of sink attachment that a hose can use. You should be able to unscrew your aerator on your sink, take it to the hardware store and match up an adaptor that will allow you to use a standard hose or python etc. Once you do that you can mix your cold and hot water for the right temp when filling the tank.

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I do something similar - many times most of the year. I take the fish and the snails out of the tank and place them in a sterlite container with a couple of buckets of tank water. Empty the tank. Fill the tank with the cold water hose. Add a bucket or two of warm/hot water. Let it all sit for 30-60 minutes with filter running and lights on.

Then, I add the prime, the fish and the snails back in the tank.

This is my routine for my 'large' changes (every 2 weeks). The weekly change is 50% with buckets (water is removed with a pond pump out an open window) and refilled with buckets.

I would love a python but my 1880 house with WWII plumping presents some challenges.

This seems like a great option! It would give you time to tinker with the temperature without affecting your fish!

Yeah, I might have to do this! Take them out of the tank and "mix" the water to the right temperature. Chippie always acts like I've abused her for a week or so whenever I move her, but she will have to get used to it.

Yesterday's water change went horribly:

The Python I bought hooked up to the sink only partially, so it dripped. I drained ~80% of the tank using a 3 gallon bucket, my usual method.

But while refilling it, I somehow forgot that the plumbing in the bathroom was INSTALLED BY IDIOTS. If the water runs for "too long," it floods. Volume apparently doesn't matter.

After around 6 gallons of drips had gone down the sink, the bathroom FLOODED from underneath the sink cabinet. Everything under the sink, toilet paper, paper towels, "feminine hygiene" products, all ruined. Scattered cat litter (the litterbox is in there) turned to sludge. Argh.

So, I filled the rest of the tank (~70%) lugging a bucket with 2 gallons at a time (to avoid spilling) from the upstairs bathtub faucet. Ugh.

Before next Sunday, I will buy a sink adaptor with threads, see how it goes. It sure would be nice to not need to carry any buckets at all!

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I would just like to put this out there :).

What about a 264gph pond pump from harbor freight and then some tubing? That is my method since my pluming is too old and floods like yours with the python. I just run the tubing out of a window to drain my tank, and then get a bucket in the sink/tub and match the temp. I put the pump in and the tubing into the tank and turn it on. I made a tip about it :). Let me see if I can find it.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/113508-easy-water-change/page-2#entry1617123

Edited by Mikey

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I was just going to mention Mikey's thread. This is the method I am adopting once my new pump appears.

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We are going to have to start calling it "The Mikey Method!" :rofl

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The "Mikey method" is what has made water changes relaxing and more frequent. :nana

Two 95%s a week? Yes please!

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Yesterday's water change went horribly:

The Python I bought hooked up to the sink only partially, so it dripped. I drained ~80% of the tank using a 3 gallon bucket, my usual method.

But while refilling it, I somehow forgot that the plumbing in the bathroom was INSTALLED BY IDIOTS. If the water runs for "too long," it floods. Volume apparently doesn't matter.

After around 6 gallons of drips had gone down the sink, the bathroom FLOODED from underneath the sink cabinet. Everything under the sink, toilet paper, paper towels, "feminine hygiene" products, all ruined. Scattered cat litter (the litterbox is in there) turned to sludge. Argh.

So, I filled the rest of the tank (~70%) lugging a bucket with 2 gallons at a time (to avoid spilling) from the upstairs bathtub faucet. Ugh.

Before next Sunday, I will buy a sink adaptor with threads, see how it goes. It sure would be nice to not need to carry any buckets at all!

OMG!!! This is horrible!! What a mess!!! I hope the next time goes much better!

I would just like to put this out there :).

What about a 264gph pond pump from harbor freight and then some tubing? That is my method since my pluming is too old and floods like yours with the python. I just run the tubing out of a window to drain my tank, and then get a bucket in the sink/tub and match the temp. I put the pump in and the tubing into the tank and turn it on. I made a tip about it :). Let me see if I can find it.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/113508-easy-water-change/page-2#entry1617123

Mikey - I am ready to do my first big water change on a 29 gallon…I was planning on using the python to drain the water out through the window using gravity so I won't waste tap water during the draining. Will that work?? Or will it take forever??

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Yesterday's water change went horribly:

The Python I bought hooked up to the sink only partially, so it dripped. I drained ~80% of the tank using a 3 gallon bucket, my usual method.

But while refilling it, I somehow forgot that the plumbing in the bathroom was INSTALLED BY IDIOTS. If the water runs for "too long," it floods. Volume apparently doesn't matter.

After around 6 gallons of drips had gone down the sink, the bathroom FLOODED from underneath the sink cabinet. Everything under the sink, toilet paper, paper towels, "feminine hygiene" products, all ruined. Scattered cat litter (the litterbox is in there) turned to sludge. Argh.

So, I filled the rest of the tank (~70%) lugging a bucket with 2 gallons at a time (to avoid spilling) from the upstairs bathtub faucet. Ugh.

Before next Sunday, I will buy a sink adaptor with threads, see how it goes. It sure would be nice to not need to carry any buckets at all!

OMG!!! This is horrible!! What a mess!!! I hope the next time goes much better!

I would just like to put this out there :).

What about a 264gph pond pump from harbor freight and then some tubing? That is my method since my pluming is too old and floods like yours with the python. I just run the tubing out of a window to drain my tank, and then get a bucket in the sink/tub and match the temp. I put the pump in and the tubing into the tank and turn it on. I made a tip about it :). Let me see if I can find it.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/113508-easy-water-change/page-2#entry1617123

Mikey - I am ready to do my first big water change on a 29 gallonI was planning on using the python to drain the water out through the window using gravity so I won't waste tap water during the draining. Will that work?? Or will it take forever??
I use gravity too :). It shouldn't take too long. It takes maybe 20-30 minutes for me, but then again, I have a 55. ;)

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I use gravity too :). It shouldn't take too long. It takes maybe 20-30 minutes for me, but then again, I have a 55. ;)

Cool beans! :greenbanana:

I misread your post earlier and thought you were using the pond pump to remove the water…not put it back in… :hide:

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I would just like to put this out there :).

What about a 264gph pond pump from harbor freight and then some tubing? That is my method since my pluming is too old and floods like yours with the python. I just run the tubing out of a window to drain my tank, and then get a bucket in the sink/tub and match the temp. I put the pump in and the tubing into the tank and turn it on. I made a tip about it :). Let me see if I can find it.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/113508-easy-water-change/page-2#entry1617123

I read the thread, but I don't know if "The Mickey Method" is the best choice for me; since Mikey has sand that he says stays clear of poop and debris, and I have river rocks that get poop stuck around them and NEED to be suctioned.

It's too bad that old plumbing (or stupid plumbing) plus Pythons causes floods and leaks. I don't want to risk it again; I am going to return the Python.

This Sunday, I will try the "removing the fish and mixing hot and cold water method" and see how it goes. Maybe say a little prayer for the hardwood flooring that lines the path from the upstairs bathtub to the tank..

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That's why you use gravity and tubing to act like a python to suck up the poop. ;)

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