Jump to content

Growth?


stiglitz

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Hi, hmmm. I don't think I've read anything like that before.

A lot of us do use heaters when the weather gets colder though. I use a heater in my tank because I turn off my heater at night time (for me) and I don't want my fish tank to fluctuate too much in degrees. I have my tank heater set at 74. Others might set it a bit higher and others a bit lower. :)

A lot has to do with the fish genetics. Also, Do you have an appropriate size tank for him to grow in? Do you feed him a balanced diet of foods?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

If you have 1 comet, I think if you have him in a 20 long (or a 20 high which is okay, but the 20 long will give him more swimming room) with an aquaclear 70 and keep up with weekly water changes, you should see some definite growth in a month to a few months :). This is just me, but I like to keep my tank between 72-75. But, keep in mind, you will need to upgrade his tank ;) a 40 breeder should be good but preferably a 55 or 75 gallon when he is bigger, or better yet, a pond!

Edited by Mikey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Cooler water results in slower growth which continues for a longer time. The temperature of the water has little, if any, effect on the ultimate size. Cooler water and slower growth probably increase life span. Some report that goldfish in tropical waters are showing signs of aging when cold water fish are just reaching prime reproductive age.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Well, if you think about it in terms of metabolism, heated water will speed up the metabolism, but you would also need the correct tank size and correct food. Speeding up the metabolism of a fish will mean you need to feed them whole ingredient food, a variety of it, multiple times a day. This also takes into account the size of the tank and the filter as well. Colder water slows the metabolism making digestion slower making growth slower. But honesty, most of the time people just use heaters to keep the temp of their water consistent so it doesn't fluctuate. I wouldn't suggest putting a goldfish in water that is super heated. Just my opinion :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

You didn't mention how old he is, or if he is in a pond or tank, but I only use a heater for fry, not adult fish. But I live in central coast California, where we practically don't have seasons - the temp is pretty much the same all year round.

I grew my first batch of fry with no heater and they grew very slowly. Eventually they all died, but I'm not sure if it was related to the temp or if it was just flukes. The two I have from my second batch are being kept in a heated (~75F) 10 long and are growing much faster, and appear healthy. They are about 2 1/2 months old now. I keep fancies though, not comets.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

There are other factors that trigger growth in goldfish, and temperature is not the most prominent.

Food, space, and water parameters play a big role in growth. But, as mentioned, consistent warmer water leads to a sped-up metabolism which leads to a shorter life.

Please provide more info on your setup\age of your fish so we can better determine and predict his growth rate. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Lots of space and a varied diet of high quality foods. I feel like Pro Gold contributes to good growth if your fish don't get floaty on it. As for the heat, just keep it consistent (in the 72 range is usually good).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi, hmmm. I don't think I've read anything like that before.

A lot of us do use heaters when the weather gets colder though. I use a heater in my tank because I turn off my heater at night time (for me) and I don't want my fish tank to fluctuate too much in degrees. I have my tank heater set at 74. Others might set it a bit higher and others a bit lower. :)

A lot has to do with the fish genetics. Also, Do you have an appropriate size tank for him to grow in? Do you feed him a balanced diet of foods?

If you have 1 comet, I think if you have him in a 20 long (or a 20 high which is okay, but the 20 long will give him more swimming room) with an aquaclear 70 and keep up with weekly water changes, you should see some definite growth in a month to a few months :). This is just me, but I like to keep my tank between 72-75. But, keep in mind, you will need to upgrade his tank ;) a 40 breeder should be good but preferably a 55 or 75 gallon when he is bigger, or better yet, a pond!

Well, if you think about it in terms of metabolism, heated water will speed up the metabolism, but you would also need the correct tank size and correct food. Speeding up the metabolism of a fish will mean you need to feed them whole ingredient food, a variety of it, multiple times a day. This also takes into account the size of the tank and the filter as well. Colder water slows the metabolism making digestion slower making growth slower. But honesty, most of the time people just use heaters to keep the temp of their water consistent so it doesn't fluctuate. I wouldn't suggest putting a goldfish in water that is super heated. Just my opinion :D

Okay, sorry for the lack of information! Hopefully this answers all of your questions:

1 comet goldfish in a 55 gallon tank. Filtration is one Aqueon 55/75 HOB filter, and a SunSun HW-302 canister filter. I do 75% water changes every Friday and then 25% every Monday. He is about 1.5 inches and I've had him for 5 days now. I feed him Omega One pellets as a staple, and as treats I feed spirulina flakes, Omega One seaweed, Emerald Entree, Bloodworms, and fresh greens.

I live in Seattle, Washington and it gets pretty cold here. Regardless, I think I'll give him a heater so the temp can be consistent. Thanks for all of the useful information :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi, hmmm. I don't think I've read anything like that before.

A lot of us do use heaters when the weather gets colder though. I use a heater in my tank because I turn off my heater at night time (for me) and I don't want my fish tank to fluctuate too much in degrees. I have my tank heater set at 74. Others might set it a bit higher and others a bit lower. :)

A lot has to do with the fish genetics. Also, Do you have an appropriate size tank for him to grow in? Do you feed him a balanced diet of foods?

If you have 1 comet, I think if you have him in a 20 long (or a 20 high which is okay, but the 20 long will give him more swimming room) with an aquaclear 70 and keep up with weekly water changes, you should see some definite growth in a month to a few months :). This is just me, but I like to keep my tank between 72-75. But, keep in mind, you will need to upgrade his tank ;) a 40 breeder should be good but preferably a 55 or 75 gallon when he is bigger, or better yet, a pond!

Well, if you think about it in terms of metabolism, heated water will speed up the metabolism, but you would also need the correct tank size and correct food. Speeding up the metabolism of a fish will mean you need to feed them whole ingredient food, a variety of it, multiple times a day. This also takes into account the size of the tank and the filter as well. Colder water slows the metabolism making digestion slower making growth slower. But honesty, most of the time people just use heaters to keep the temp of their water consistent so it doesn't fluctuate. I wouldn't suggest putting a goldfish in water that is super heated. Just my opinion :D

Okay, sorry for the lack of information! Hopefully this answers all of your questions:

1 comet goldfish in a 55 gallon tank. Filtration is one Aqueon 55/75 HOB filter, and a SunSun HW-302 canister filter. I do 75% water changes every Friday and then 25% every Monday. He is about 1.5 inches and I've had him for 5 days now. I feed him Omega One pellets as a staple, and as treats I feed spirulina flakes, Omega One seaweed, Emerald Entree, Bloodworms, and fresh greens.

I live in Seattle, Washington and it gets pretty cold here. Regardless, I think I'll give him a heater so the temp can be consistent. Thanks for all of the useful information :)

Sounds good!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Sounds good!

That sounds like your goldfish is in heaven. ;) nice setup!!! :thumbs:

Thanks! I'm keeping a log on him. Taking pictures every Friday as well as measuring. Hopefully in a month I'll see something. Even half an inch would make me happy :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I just find that it's so interesting that people are so paranoid about natural temperature fluctuations over the course of the day. This is normal, and isn't bad for the fish. I really see very little reason to keep a heater in a goldfish tank, unless your house is in the 50s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I just find that it's so interesting that people are so paranoid about natural temperature fluctuations over the course of the day. This is normal, and isn't bad for the fish. I really see very little reason to keep a heater in a goldfish tank, unless your house is in the 50s.

It sucks to put your hand in a cold tank? :P

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I just find that it's so interesting that people are so paranoid about natural temperature fluctuations over the course of the day. This is normal, and isn't bad for the fish. I really see very little reason to keep a heater in a goldfish tank, unless your house is in the 50s.

It sucks to put your hand in a cold tank? :P

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

:tomuch: and I do that often!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Supporter

Thanks! I'm keeping a log on him. Taking pictures every Friday as well as measuring. Hopefully in a month I'll see something. Even half an inch would make me happy :P

oooh! perhaps we will be fortunate enough to stumble across those pictures too? hint hint.. :D

(perhaps not EVERY Friday... but the runner up would be nice :P )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I just find that it's so interesting that people are so paranoid about natural temperature fluctuations over the course of the day. This is normal, and isn't bad for the fish. I really see very little reason to keep a heater in a goldfish tank, unless your house is in the 50s.

I agree. Diurnal changes in light and temperature are normal for all organisms on the planet. Therefore one expects constant light, darkness, or temperature to produce stress, not well-being.

Here is the abstract of an old paper that compared the growth of goldfish fry under stable temperatures and daily temperature fluctuations:

Peculiarities of fish growth in relation to temperature fluctuation.
Abstract (summary)

The growth rate, biochemical composition of the body and blood parameters were studied in juvenile common carp, Cyprinus carpio , a hybrid between silver carp and bighead, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix x Aristichthys nobilis and goldfish, Carassius auratus , under fluctuating and stable temperatures. Temperature fluctuations and stable temperatures. Temperature fluctuations accelerated growth of all species, and blood parameters. Water content decreases, relative content of fat-free residue in dry matter decreases, and proportion of lipids increases. The hemoglobin content and erythrocyte count are significantly higher in fishes exposed totemperature fluctuations than in the control.

I never found the full paper, so I don't know what temperature ranges they tested. At constant temperatures, goldfish will grow faster in warmer water, up to the upper 80s F. In a later paper, they said that goldfish grew faster in warm day, cooler night cycles than they did at a constant temperature equal to the warm-day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

You definitely don't need a heater for goldfish, but lots of people have them for various reasons. I have a heater stable at 21*C (70*F), and they are lot more active than when the temp would dip down to 12*C (54*F). But them main thing to consider with temperature is that you are feeding them appropriately - As Scurrie mentioned, colder water= slower metabolism = they need less food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
  • Regular Member

Well, if you think about it in terms of metabolism, heated water will speed up the metabolism, but you would also need the correct tank size and correct food. Speeding up the metabolism of a fish will mean you need to feed them whole ingredient food, a variety of it, multiple times a day. This also takes into account the size of the tank and the filter as well. Colder water slows the metabolism making digestion slower making growth slower. But honesty, most of the time people just use heaters to keep the temp of their water consistent so it doesn't fluctuate. I wouldn't suggest putting a goldfish in water that is super heated. Just my opinion :D

she is exactly right in my opinion

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Supporter

Also thought I should mention that there are other things that affect fish growth that we can not control like genetics. If it is in the fish to get to 14" or more its possible to make it but if its not and its max size is 9" then no matter what we do we cant make it 14". Just like people with a proper diet we can better reach our potential but if you DNA says 5' under normal circumstances thet person will not make it to 6'. Anyway just thought id through that out there. I wish you the best of luck.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My commons and comets markedly slow down when the water is in the mid 70s to high 80s (summer), and are much more active when the water is in the 60s. They look like they are conserving energy / going dormant when the water is too warm. Commons and comets are cold water fish, so I try to keep the water cold.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My commons and comets markedly slow down when the water is in the mid 70s to high 80s (summer), and are much more active when the water is in the 60s. They look like they are conserving energy / going dormant when the water is too warm. Commons and comets are cold water fish, so I try to keep the water cold.

I try to keep mine cold, too. My tank is in my basement, which is usually around 64-68 in the winter, and around 70 in the summer. I don't care about the fluctuations, because, like Alex said, they are natural in the wild. Mine are very active as well. I see many more benefits keeping your tank cool rather than keeping it warm.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My commons and comets markedly slow down when the water is in the mid 70s to high 80s (summer), and are much more active when the water is in the 60s. They look like they are conserving energy / going dormant when the water is too warm. Commons and comets are cold water fish, so I try to keep the water cold.

It makes a big difference what temperature the fish are adapted to. My fish are at their peak of activity during the four months that the pond temperature is in the low to high 80s, and boy do they eat. The first year I had my pond I was concerned when all my fish were laying on the bottom one day in the fall. It lasted about three days until they got used to water temps in the 70s. As soon as we'd have a few days that were cool enough to lower the water temperature, they were on the bottom again. Right now, the water is in the high sixties, and their behavior is normal, but they are a little slow and eat less.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...