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Do you put part of the cord underwater in internal filters?


ladybug

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I'm sorry. :hug I didn't mean to be rude.

But in all honesty, if you want a fish while in college, I think your best bet would be a Betta fish. With a goldfish in a 5.5 gallon tank, you will be needing to do huge water changes daily which takes time hour of your day that you could be studying. I'm not trying to be rude, but that's just my opinion; I'm sorry if it sounds rude. :(

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Welcome Ladybug!

I also want to remind members that since she is a student in college, the tank and filter might be the best she can afford at the moment.

A 5.5 gallon is not the end of the world. Just keep up on daily water changes, especially now that the tank will start cycling. Do you have access to a test kit or someone that can test the water for you? These test readings will help determine how much water you need to be changing or how often. And I would also buy some water conditioner by Seachem, called Prime. It will help detoxify the water should you get really busy with school. It is not a substitute for water changes though ;)

About your filter. I have had several internal filters where the cord starts at the bottom of the filter. So the cord is at least 4 inches in the water. It never caused an issue. Also, I believe that you can position the filter to either give you a spray or no spray. If it is possible to rotate the spray bar so that the water goes up to the surface to create some surface agitation, that would be ideal. However, it might make some noise that would keep you and your roomie awake. I know that the sound of trickling water drives me crazy when I try to sleep.

I hope you are not putoff by the members here. This really is the best forum out there, we just get kinda crazy because we love these darn fish so much.

Spelling is not my friend

Edited by ashlee18
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I'm sorry. :hug I didn't mean to be rude.

But in all honesty, if you want a fish while in college, I think your best bet would be a Betta fish. With a goldfish in a 5.5 gallon tank, you will be needing to do huge water changes daily which takes time hour of your day that you could be studying. I'm not trying to be rude, but that's just my opinion; I'm sorry if it sounds rude. :(

Mikey, she has already had the fish for months. I don't think another fish is an option now ;)

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I have a similar filter and have the cord slightly under the water so it should be fine! I don't have the spray bar trickling because I just can't sleep with it so it doesn't matter if you don't. You might want to in the summer though when it's hot, maybe just in the daytime. :)

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I did not mean to sound 'preachy,' but helpful. Sorry that you felt that way.

Let me reiterate here that I am also a college student. It takes me awhile to save for things, so I understand your position. It's also taught me to be resourceful in the things I do for the fish. There are quite a few DIY projects that this forum has introduced me to that help a lot in terms of budget. I think my favorite is using a clear Sterilite tub for a tank. I understand that you may not have much floor space right now, but it's something to think about. I have a 116 quart one for a quarantine tank and it's great to be able to set up as I need it. It's even better that it only cost me about 20 bucks.

I agree with Ashlee18 about the test kit and Prime being what you aim for right now, followed by some cheap quilt batting or filter padding to use as filter media to replace the cartridge with. Cartridges get really expensive and don't facilitate cycling because you throw them away. Since your tank is new, cycling is going to be the first thing that you should worry about.

Welcome to Koko's, the best place where crazy fish people gather on the internet.

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:welcome

It looks like you're in good hand as far as your questions go, sometime we Kokonuts need to be reminded that getting a good set up for a fishy doesn't happen over night and that a bombardment of help is sometimes overwhelming! :krazy: Things should calm down now that we've been reminded! :teehee It's not that we want to be preachy or know-it-alls we just want to help and are excited to help. :oops:

My only advice is babysteps :) As long as you keep up on your water changes your little finned friend should be alright for now. I wish I would have had someone grab my hand and have me set up my tank slower :P I wouldn't have as much fishy debt :rofl But really take your time! Use the 5.5 gallon for as long as you're comfortable and then maybe get a sterilite tub! It's not the prettiest thing in the world but it will be so helpful and healthy for your fishy :)

I would also agree that first on your list would be that water test (I recommend saving for the API master test as it will last you forever and has everything you need) and Prime (this will also last forever because you don't need very much especially for that little tank!) :)

Good luck!

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This is why I hate conglomo pet stores. They sell these tiny outfits with a goldfish. Then the person gets the fish home and everything is fine for a few weeks. Then the fun begins.......Upside down, white spots, red fuzz, white fuzz, bottom sitting, shredded fins, etc, etc, etc.........

Poor fishies........I mean I feel bad for the person...as they are unsuspecting.........but I feel much worse for the fish.

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Ladybug, firstly welcome to the forum!

the API freshwater master test kits are $20 on amazon with free shipping, so this might be a cheaper option for you :http://www.amazon.com/API-Freshwater-Master-Test-Kit/dp/B000255NCI

Also, have a look on craigslist for second hand tanks. For one fish, even if you can upgrade to a 10 gallon, you'll have an easier job, but as Ashlee said, 5.5 gallons is not the end of the world. Just be diligent with water changes and definitely try and get a test kit as soon as you can.

Ideally you'll want to get your fish into a minimum tank size of 15 gallons, preferably 20 gallons per goldfish, but whilst they are small you can definitely maintain one a 10 gallon. I'm currently doing so myself with a little goldfish until he's big enough for the pond :)

Edited by Narny105
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