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rickibarnes

Clamping, surfacing hanging, pineconing, white spikes, red gills

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He is a cutie. :). And that is great about the medicated food. :lol2. Did you get everything Helen said? And maybe he looks different since he is more pine coned then yesterday. :idont

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Please do not do any more salt dips. It makes the fish pinecone more.

Is there an expiration date on the Epsom salt.

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Yep, got the salt dip thing. I only did the dip before because I didn't know it was bad for him in this case.

I didn't think there was an expiry on the Epsom salt, but on closer examination I see it's kind of stamped into the box. Seems to be January 2013, which I guess answers that question.

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OK, I must have misread your post above. I thought you did another one today, since Helen helping you. Sorry . . . :D

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Ha no - I am already in paroxysms of guilt over having inadvertently made it worse. Though I'm hoping the fact that I didn't kill him is an indication that he is pretty tough and therefore might pull through!

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We always treat fish in ways that help them heal themselves. Goldfish themselves have immune systems and our job as owners is just to provide a helpful healing nudge with care. :)

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I'm just looking to see if I can find a medicated gel food recipe - a site search of Koko's doesn't seem to turn one up? Can I just go ahead and Google for it, or is there one that you guys would consider to be recommended?

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have you got the meds yet, hun?

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I just want to give you a friendly Hello and to say, that I'm sorry your adorable fish is sick at this time.

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Thanks 4prettyfish :)

Helen, no not yet - I am just waiting for the vet to call me back and confirm whether they will sell me some without examining the sick animal! How do you usually get your hands on it - I presume nobody actually takes their fish to the vet?

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I don't know if he's going to be able to eat, even if I do get the meds and make the gel food in time. He has been listing for a while now, not really able to swim at all this morning, and has just ended up completely on his side :(

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i have a supplier ;):)

re the gelfood, we will just keep it simple. you can make this at home or work. all you need are a few veggies and some gelatine. i make the mediacted gelfood with peas, spinach, some carrot, garlic, sometimes i add sardines from can that are in springwater (the Brunswick brand, available at coles) or tuna in springwater. whichever has less salt or you can use one or two cubes of bloodworms. i prepare all that by softening the veggies (discarding the water) and then blending it all together. i use the water that i have boiled the spinach with to make the gelatine. once i have a measure of how much food i have, then i add the metro, blend again so that it forms consistancy and i allow it to set.

you will need to weigh your fish :) here's a vid on how to do so:

the Metronidazole dose is 1 gram for every 100 grams of food, then your fish needs to be fed 1% of it's bodyweight in food each day for a minimum of 14 days.

Ricki, you can make more food as this can be fed as the staple diet. having more than bloodworms and a pea from time to time can only do him some good. a food as i have explained above, because of the pea & spinach content will also help your fish to be regular, the garlic will offer probiotics and the bloodworms/sardines/tuna will offer protein. if you make a nice batch, then you just need to separate 100 grams or 200 grams to medicate and the rest can just be reserved & frozen for regular feeding once the course of medicines is complete and he has recovered.

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Thanks for that recipe, though it's looking less and less likely that he will live long enough to eat any of it.

The vet has rung back and I can go and pick up the Metronidazole at 11.00, but I don't know if he is even going to make it until then..... :(

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aawww :( i was just typing my reply to you. i am so sorry :( :(

because Metronidazole is just about the first thing we run to when we see bacteria/infection in goldfish, i would adivse you to still go to collect it from your Vet if you see yourself continuing in this hobby, it is always a good fish med to have hanging around & because bacteria is a fast moving problem, having this at hand is really helpful. it also has a very long shelf life.

if you decide to buy another fish, we can guide you through QT with salt and Praziquantel routines and hopefully, this won't happen again.

now, the best thing is to sterilize everything to ensure any parasite/bacteria does not remain. you can put your applesnail in a tub with an airwand/stone whilst you do all this. he's fine to stay in there for a few days. you will need to sterilize the pants too. this will get rid of all the unwanted snails also.

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Thank you for all the help. I don't know how I feel about getting another fish yet (although I had already decided to still go and get the medication, if that says anything). I am very discouraged by the tank of death at the moment.

I didn't realise that people quarantine all fish - I have seen it mentioned before but I figured it was just for fish being introduced into a tank that had other fish already. Maybe that would make a difference. Do you have to have a second tank for quarantining, or if you only have the one fish could you do it in the main tank?

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I am sorry for your loss. :hug

Don't be discouraged, just make sure you clean, clean, clean. That is the most important thing to do right now. Once everything is all set back up, do a fishless cycle if there is nothing left in the tank and get another goldfish. Don't be hard on yourself, dropsy is very hard, but possible to treat. Hoping all will go well from here. :bighug

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I'm so sorry :(

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Sad to check in and read about your fish. Sounds lie, you did your very best. I can't imagine not having fish....I'd honor his memory and start over. It sounds like you are just as devoted tomfishkeeping as everyone here.

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Thanks for the sympathy everyone, it does help.

Part of the reason I'm getting discouraged is the ridicule I'm getting here at work. I don't want to make that sound like I'm being bullied or anything - we are a very small workplace and it's more like a family, really. But everyone else here is a sceptic to all the new techniques I've been learning ("I've had two fish is a tank a third of the size of that one, and they've been going for 4 years!" is the sort of thing I'm hearing (and true, I have to admit)) and the prevailing opinion seems to be that I'm actually causing this to happen by over-managing it.

I don't believe that, but it's a hard position to maintain when the last two fish I've had each lasted less than two weeks, and the one before lived for a few years in a bowl then died shortly after being put in this tank! Is there any chance there could be some truth behind the tank of death nickname - i.e. that the tank I have is somehow killing them itself? It is a product that is manufactured in China by a Chinese company, though presumably it still has to meet Australian standards.

Is there any reason why an all-in-one tank like this one (built-in filter, attached hood with built-in light) is less suitable for fish keeping?

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Don't let there comments being you down. You should hear the ones I get. :o. As for the fish in the bowl that you transferred into the tank, was the tank cycled? If not, and you didn't test the results of the tank or did water changes to keep the ammonia down during cycling, that would most likely be the culprit as to why the first fish does. After you got the second fish, I'm not sure how you cleaned the tank, you could have started the cycle over again. So this time, we will give you all the help you need to set up a good home for the next fish :). We are here for you. :hug

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hun, i can vouch for the fact that the quality of goldfish is degrading :(

all this inbreeding and aside from parasites where the numbers are growing, but diseases are more and well, the lifespan of our goldfish is becoming shorter :(

truth of the matter is now, many years back, breeders were more interested in culling larger number of fish for the sake of a few who would grow strong and bring big profit. nowdays, as long as they have all the fins, even if a bit wonky, they are good for mass onsell to retailers.

so, our loving fancy fish are dropping in quality and those breeders who are sticking to their guns & producing a fine line are charging big bucks for their stock.

all we can do is try to give them the best of what we can understand to offer them and hope for the best :heart

we're not here to convince you either way, just to offer our opinion and help you to decide what is best for you. goldfish require a lot of dedication as they are really dirty where it concerns waste. that does need weekly cleaning and the majority of their water changed each week. we also understand that in your size tank, it's borderline enough for 1 fancy goldie (not a singletail).

if you think the maintenance routine can fit into your work schedule, that's great. but do keep in mind that the lifespan of a fancy goldfish is between 3-5 years and in that time, you're bound to experience health problems with it even if you do provide the essentials with a religious maintenance routine.

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Sometimes people are just unlucky. My boss kept a betta in a small bowl for probably about a year or more with no heater, no plants to hide in, no lid and no water conditioner used! (She now has a different one in a proper tropical tank). I brought one in a heated cycled 21 litre tank and he jumped out of it within 3 months. I brought a new one and he also died most likely from parasites in less than 3 months :(

Don't let what people say get to you, the best of us can lose fish very quickly even when we do everything right. It's hard when you see people doing everything wrong and their fish is fine. But you have to remember you are doing the right thing and offering these fish the best lives they can have :)

I also agree with Helen about the quality of fish and fish shops going way down, it makes me so sad.

I am so sorry for the loss of your fish, I went through nearly the same thing at the start of the year with one of my goldfish, it's horrible.

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