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Snail Bio-Load?


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What is the average bioload for snails?

Here are the types I am looking into.

Which one is has the smallest bioload?

Apple

Nerite

Ramshorns

Trumpet

Also, which one is less likely to escape?

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I would say Nerite.

Apple Snails are big waste producers.

Trumpets can multiply quickly and therefore their output increases quickly.

I believe the same of ramshorns, but am not sure.

I've had no issues with my Nerites trying to escape so far. They are pretty good if you leave a little out-of-water space at the top of the tank.

Make sure you have at least a couple of gallons your goldfish aren't taking up before you think of snails. ;)

Edited by ChelseaM
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I would say that individual ramshorns have the smallest bioload. I had one and never detected any Am increase at all. The difficulty with ramshorns is, as Chelsea said, that it is hard to have just one as they breed prolifically.

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So far on the forum a single nerites seems to be able to eat the diatoms in a 20 gal tank. Any snail that that has an easy time laying eggs will increase the waste in the tank. I would say those are the apple (mystery).

Providing lots of hiding spaces 'should' prevent snails from roaming. I know that surface plants prevent my pond snails from leaving as it helps them walk the surface of the water.

I honestly don't know if there is a correlation between 'too small of space' and snails who try to escape. As snails get larger they so need to be fed independently from tank mates. Most people use a breeder box for this purpose.

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I would think the smaller the snail the smaller the bio-load,I traded out my 3 mystery snails for the smaller version of nerites (horned variety) and see no impact on the ammonia or nitrates ever :) and they are wonderful little algae eating machines :)

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I know that this is kind of gross but when my nerite snail does his business, he goes to the top of the tank glass to do it where there is no water. When I do a water change a just get it off with a tissue so I don't think my snail affects my water quality at all!

Edited by CoralPeachy
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I know that this is kind of gross but when my nerite snail does his business, he goes to the top of the tank glass to do it where there is no water. When I do a water change a just get it off with a tissue so I don't think my snail affects my water quality at all!

Actually, this is not true.

Besides pooping out wastes, aquatic snails, like fish, also respire/excrete ammonia. So, snails will most definitely affect your water quality.

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I know that this is kind of gross but when my nerite snail does his business, he goes to the top of the tank glass to do it where there is no water. When I do a water change a just get it off with a tissue so I don't think my snail affects my water quality at all!

Actually, this is not true.

Besides pooping out wastes, aquatic snails, like fish, also respire/excrete ammonia. So, snails will most definitely affect your water quality.

Oh, I didn't know that!

Edited by CoralPeachy
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