Jump to content

Lighting to grow a green carpet


Mikey

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Hello :). I was wondering what type of lighting I need to grow a green carpet. I have low lighting on my tank (:() I only have a total of 30 watts. I would like it around the 80's or higher. Does anyone have any recommendations? I have a 55 gallon with (2) 24 inch full hoods. The tubes are T8 18 inch. Thank you :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

What type of plants do you wish to grow? I know you want a lush "green carpet", but there are many different types of carpeting plants, and they all have different requirements—granted some are fairly similar. Generally you will also want some sort of Co2 system; however, not all carpeting plants require it. They will, however, do best with Co2. The growing medium (substrate) you choose should be taken into consideration too. I suggest having a read over this article.

There are many solutions as far as lighting is concerned. I find it's best to either know what you want to grow first, or choose lighting first and work around that. Choosing plants first is your best bet though, because it allows you to tailor your equipment to suit your needs. It's all about working smarter, not harder. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Daniel,

I think Mikey wants an algae "carpet," like the one the thread that has so inspired him. :)

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/111541-my-chinese-friends-their-goldfish/?fromsearch=1

Oh I see, thanks, Alex.

Mikey, I would heed Watson's advice, he appears to be the expert at this. I'm thinking T5HO too, although if you have a good reflector, there's no reason a T8 fixture can't generate more light to grow green algae.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hey Mikey, for best results, I would go straight to the carpet expert, Watson.

However, one time I got lucky. After scraping all the dusty brown algae on my glass walls, I changed my lighting schedule. Two weeks later, my algae was green hair algae. After I scraped the green stuff off, it came back brown again. I'm not entirely sure how that happens, but you could try tinkering with your lighting schedule. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Daniel,

I think Mikey wants an algae "carpet," like the one the thread that has so inspired him. :)

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/111541-my-chinese-friends-their-goldfish/?fromsearch=1

Oh I see, thanks, Alex.

Mikey, I would heed Watson's advice, he appears to be the expert at this. I'm thinking T5HO too, although if you have a good reflector, there's no reason a T8 fixture can't generate more light to grow green algae.

My tank is directly in front of a window. I was thinking of buying plant lights and leaving my blinds open. That should be enough light, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hey Mikey, for best results, I would go straight to the carpet expert, Watson.

However, one time I got lucky. After scraping all the dusty brown algae on my glass walls, I changed my lighting schedule. Two weeks later, my algae was green hair algae. After I scraped the green stuff off, it came back brown again. I'm not entirely sure how that happens, but you could try tinkering with your lighting schedule. :)

I have it on 12 hours a day 7 days a week :). And I am seeing a tiny bit of green algae but that's it. Watson said the nitrates and everything need to be low, which they are all 0 thanks to my bamboo :). So if I get the higher output plant lights and leave my blinds open, that should be enough I hope. :rofl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

You may end up with a tank full of green water, if you leave your blinds open. Watch for temp fluctuations also.

I don't mind green water, my fish do though. :rofl. And I have a heater to stop fluctuations for the most part :).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11248157&f=PAD%2FpsNotAvailInUS%2FNo



The sun baking on your tank might heat the water too much. A heater won't help you there.

true. But it has been there for 3 years and I haven't seen any heating differences . :o



Yea a tank in direct sun is not a good thing. You always want indirect or filtered light (through a blind) to cut down on temp fluctuations caused by sunlight.

I could do that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The window might have been there the whole time, but I don't know that you were purposely opening the curtains, to let the sunshine into the tank. I think a fully open curtain is a bad idea, right near a tank, that's all. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The window might have been there the whole time, but I don't know that you were purposely opening the curtains, to let the sunshine into the tank. I think a fully open curtain is a bad idea, right near a tank, that's all. :(

I'll have my blinds down :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...