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Fluval Stratum


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  • Regular Member

So I bought a bag of Fluval Stratum for shrimp a while ago and today I finally put it to good use. I mixed it with the gravel already in my tank because I can't afford to cover the whole bottom with the substrate but after rearranging my plants, I read the back of the bag and it stated "do not use for cichlids, goldfish, koi or any other fish that would actively dig at the substrate."

Help! I don't know how bad it is for them or how to take it out if it is bad. The goldfish have also been in a huge tub for 3 hours now but I'm very wary of putting them back in the tank because it is extremely cloudy.

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  • Regular Member

I tried looking around for more info to see what's actually in the substrate, or what the substrate is, and was not successful.

The only thing I can tell you is that if they explicitly stated that this is not meant for diggers, then you should remove it all, as goldfish are definitely going to be digging (and eating) the substrate.

I'm sorry. :(

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If you wanted the substrate for planting, you could try removing it, placing it in a container, planting the container and then putting a thick layer of sand over the top so the goldfish do not dig into the substrate.

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Fluval plant stratum is plant soil. It is no different from, for example, ADA Aquasoil. Of course there are proprietary chemical/nutrient differences between the two soils; however, they are still very similar. Anyway, I digress. The main reason it is not recommended for diggers, is because these fish have a tendency to muddy up the water. Over time the fired pellets turn to mud. Diggers, however, invariably dig and stir up the mud—I don't know about you, but I certainly don't find muddy water appealing. These substrates are designed for use in heavily planted tanks. In these tanks the substrate is almost invariably left alone. Thus, the mud is incapable of dirtying the water.

It should be noted that plant substrates have a tendency to soften water. Most aquatic and marsh plants grow best in soft water. Manufacturers, therefore, add water softening properties to their plant soils.

To put your mind at ease: there are NO chemicals in the substrate that will poison your fish. If this were the case it would not be sold for use with any fish. That said, you may want to monitor you pH for fluctuations.

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