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Algae in the pond


LoriF

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Well, I set up the pond two months ago and some of the fish are in there. The pond is in shade most of the day but gets sun in the late afternoon. Now it is getting really green. There is about 1700 gallons of water with a pump that pulls 6000 gals. per hour and goes through one 32 gal. can full of sponges and scratchy pads and then falls back into the pond. I also have water continuously trickling into the pond at about 30 gallons per day. What can I do about the algae? It certainly isn't bothering the fish at all but it would be nice to see them.. Will it go away by itself or do I need to do something about it?

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I think the important message here is that whatever you do, algicides should not be considered at all.

I think the "easiest" solution might be a UV, but I think that shakaho has some very good reasons for why that should not be considered first.

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How many plants do you have growing in there? A heavily planted pond will outcompete green water algae (to which I forget the technical name of). You can also do a large water change but those can be quite difficult.

How heavily stocked is your pond?

What is your feeding regimen?

Algacides have a horrible habit of affecting your cycle. Plus since they are basically chemicals, they may kill more than just the algae (plants and insects)

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I'm not even thinking of adding any kind of chemicals. Right now I only have two large lillies and two large papyrus, not a lot considering the volume of water. Oh, there is also lots of duckweed. I had scooped a bunch out but maybe I should have left it all in there. I had wanted to set up a bog filter but haven't gotten around to it yet. Maybe that will help. Is it just a mater of everything establishing itself? I have fifteen fish in there right now. My plan was to eventually have twenty at the most. They are all orandas except for one black more and two fantails.

Edited by LoriF
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The first thing to do is wait. I've never had green water, but it is very common to have green water in a new pond and also to have green water in the spring. Once you get a population of surface-growing algae established, the planktonic algae should subside.

Sun is irrelevant. Plenty of us have ponds in full subtropical sun and never get green water. Unless you are going to change all of the water every other day or so, water changes won't help. None of the crap people want to sell you to put in the water will help, so don't put anything in your water except dechlor and a little fish food. Don't remove any algae that is growing on surfaces.

Some things that might help include aeration, particularly in your filter. An airstone in the bottom of your filter can stimulate the growth of microorganisms that can help clear your water.

A fines filter, in the form of a dollar store laundry basket filled with quilt batting through which the water from your filter passes before it goes back in the pond frequently clears green water. This could be in a second filter, but I suspect it works better if the fines filter is open to light.

If your filter is upflow, so the filtered water goes out a spout near the top, you can put plants in pots of gravel in the top of the filter. This is the most efficient way of having plants compete with the green water algae. You can also have plants in a basket of gravel into which the filter dumps. It's important that the water goes through the gravel, rather that just flowing over the top.

Edit: If you can get duckweed growing in the pond (without the fish devouring every speck of it) it can compete effectively with the green water algae.

Edited by shakaho
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Yes the filter is upflow, I'll have to see what kind of plants would appreciate more shade as the filter is in a shaded area. Maybe some of those black elephant ears or something. I do believe that the fish are devouring the duckweed as it doesn't seem to be growing as fast as it once was and everyone's belly's seem to be quite fat. Thanks for all of your suggestions. I'll have to get to work on getting more plants into the pond and see how that goes. One thing for sure, the fish seem to be all very happy in there. They could care less about the green water.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Plants.

Pretty much end of story.

Get a good balance of plant lifein your pond and the algae will lessen greatly.

Also as mentioned maybe a fines filter.like a sand and gravel filter.

If your pond is only new inc filter then algae blooms will occur. It can take a few months for correct bio to establish in the filter.

And a year or two for a decent carpet algae to take hold.

I was told some ponds can take 2-4 years to establish a balance.

Aslong as its not string/angel hair algae it shouldnt be a big issue.

If its angel hair algae id be ripping it out as I can to keep on top of it as that stuff can tangle an drown your fish if it gets out of hand.

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Also is your pond inground or above etc?

Water run off from your garden/yard can cause issues too.

If its inground and runoff water can access it then maybe a channel diverting runoff away from pond is needed or a raised lip around pond to stop run off entering the pond.

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