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Need more colour!


Elle456

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I am redoing my fish pond and Just found out I have 4 comet goldfish ranging in size from 10-30 centimeters, I also have a boat load of guppys and I'm looking for more colour in the pond I don't want to over stock it though, my local fish shops don't have a lot to offer but will other types of goldfish work? And what size should I aim for? Thanks

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First of all, GORGEOUS pond! I can't wait to see it stocked and running.

I am not one of the pond experts, so I don't have much to add. I wouldn't recommend keeping goldfish with guppies, though... the goldfish will eat small fish when they get larger, and the guppies will be likely to become a quick snack.

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The guppys are mainly kept as food haha I don't care for them much but when I moved here the fish were already here and I don't think the previous owners fed them because they won't eat anything I put out and I've tried different brands and types of food but the guppys just keep breeding so I don't mind that their being eaten, I've got about 7 days left before I put the fish back in their home and I'm so excited!

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Four comets are really all the fish your little pond can handle. The fish are really very colorful, and the best way to add more color is put some beautiful plants in there. You can put in a small water lily and/or make stands on which you can place pots of land plants with the bottom of the pot submerged.

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I have had fantail guppys before and they all look like female versions of the fantail guppy but again I didn't buy any of the fish so I don't know, my interest in fish has only just begun and I plan on developing my knowlage everyday

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How big can comets really get in cm please, my two white ones are around 25cm each my large gold and white is 30 cm and small gold and white is around 10-15 cm I don't know their ages

Edited by Elle456
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30cm, or 12 inches each, on average.

[edit] When stocking an aquarium with them we recommend at bare minimum 20 gallons (75l) per fish and if it is available 40 gallons (151l) per fish. At 20 per fish the tank often needs an upgrade quickly.

Edited by ChelseaM
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A lady at my local fish store said my pond most likely holds 1500 liters based on te same dimensions I gave above, so that should mean I could hold more then four fish.

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That sticking guide is also based on 10x filtration. How much filtration does the pond have?

That stocking guide is also based on 10x filtration. How much filtration does the pond have?

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I don't know what the pump was but I plan on getting a bigger one or one suitable for the size before fish go back in, is it true the pump needs to pump the total amount of litres in pond per hour?

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If your pond were rectangular and a full 45 cm deep, 50 cm wide, and 300 cm long, it would hold 674 l (178 us gallons) filled to the top. Unless I misunderstood, the 50 cm is the greatest width, and since much of the pond is very narrow, I would estimate the actual volume is no more than 2/3 of that or 450 l. You may do your own calculations here. The best way to determine the volume of an irregular pond like yours is to fill it with water, measuring what you put in.

The minimum water for one comet in a pond with good filtration and regular water changes is 75 l. 120-150 l. per fish is preferable, and a minimum if you don't have filtration.

From the body form of your larger comets, they appear to be mature, but not old. These are average-sized fish for which stocking guidelines are designed. Their eye damage strongly suggests they have suffered from a poor environment and thus I think they will not get much longer. However older goldfish do increase in size, getting "taller" and thicker, and the amount of waste produced by a fish depends on it's mass, not its length. Your smaller fish will still grow.

I'm amused about the answers you got for how long a comet can get. The question can't be answered without determining what are you calling "length." Most people use the total length (tl) which is from the nose to the tip of the tail fin. This is not a useful measurement for goldfish, since the tail fin can be anywhere from 1/5 to twice the body length. Thus we prefer to use the standard length (sl) which is from the nose to the base of the tail fin.

The Guinness record for the longest goldfish is held by a common with a total length of 47.4 cm. That would correspond to a standard length of 38 cm. (15 inches). Comets are usually smaller and slimmer bodies than commons. The longest comet have I seen a measurement for had a tl of about 16 inches (40 cm). It had a rather short tail for a comet and probably had a sl of 11-12 inches (~30 cm) . I am sure there are larger.

Your pump should claim to turn over twice the volume of your pond per hour. You are correct that the pump should turn over the volume of the pond each hour, but the l/hr claimed is under conditions of no resistance -- no pipes, no filter, and no lifting the water above the top of the pond. You can use a pump that turns over up to 4x the pond volume per hour, but don't go less than 2x with your small pond.

All of these guidelines are based on having an external filter with a volume at least 1/10 the volume of the pond. The best and least expensive filters are those you build yourself. In your lovely garden setting, a bog filter like the one I built here, would be perfect. You can surround the container with rocks to make it fit into the landscape.

If you want to buy a filter, you need to be aware that the pond size these are supposed to filter is greatly exaggerated. A filter may say it is suitable for ponds of up to 3000l. That means that it is useless for a pond of more than 3000l even if that pond has no fish. Filtration is primarily for the fish, so a fishless pond needs virtually no filtration. My recommendation that you divide that volume by 10 since you have fish, so the filter would be good for a fish pond of up to 300l.

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Update on my pond!!

Finally finished and fish back in, of course the day after I finished we had a big wind and it blew heaps of dust in it :( but I'm so happy!!

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My fish stand out so well in here! Today I saw some chasing going on if anyone could give me tips in breeding in a pond, I have a smaller tank indoors I could transfer to, but I have no idea on how to move eggs safely.

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