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Gonna have an empty 110 soon... Help fill it? :D


Mernany

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So, currently I have my two older goldfish in my 110, yes, all alone. My baby goldfish are QT in my 20 gallon untill they are big enough to handle the power of the filter. Now I'm going to get a 55 gallon from a friend here soon and all four will turn that tank into my goldfish tank!!! Yay!

So to get to my point, I will have an empty 110 gallon tank that I'm looking to turn into a community tropical tank! I have a few questions though if anyone is able to help...

First off I should say that I plan on planting this tank and using rocks and driftwood and the such...

First question, I love Anglefish. They are amazingly beautiful! But I have read on here that they can be semi aggressive...I would love to have some... Are they better in groups? I've read the tank should be "separated" into territories? Would that help at all?

I would like there to be "action" at all levels if that makes sense? As in fishies that like the bottom, middle, and top of the tank. How would you stock like that?

What are some good types of fish? Or how would you stock a 110 gallon?

What should the pH be like? I also have a heater so I can get the temperature up easy :)

I don't want to overwhelm myself like crazy and then kill all my new fish so what's the best way to start this process....?

Thanks in advance for all the advice and help!

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Angelfish are fine in community tanks! There are 3 varieties in the aquarium trade, only 1 of them is a complete terror to tank mates, and they are actually really rare to find. They are the P. Leopoldi variety, or "dwarf angelfish". They are pretty aggressive, and shouldn't be kept with docile, slow moving fish. Another variety in the trade is the P. Altum variety, or "wild type" angelfish. They CAN be a bit on the aggressive side with other fish, but they are also kept successfully in community tanks, as well. The kind you will most likely be getting is the P. Scalare variety, as they are the most common in the hobby. Unless they are spawning, or you happen to get a jerk of a fish- they are usually pretty docile, and the majority of any aggression would be inter species (and even that is pretty mild, for the most part). I even keep mine with female bettas and a pair of dwarf gouramis (also "semi-aggressives")- there are ZERO aggression issues whatsoever, and they have lived together for a year.

If you get a spawning pair of any kind of cichlid, though, even the mellow ones like angels, you might end up with them killing tank mates to protect their spawning territory and fry. In a 110 gallon, this may not even be an issue, as they have a lot of space. There are things you can do to lessen the chances of this.

Don't get a large group. While angels are social fish, and do much better in the presence of their own kind, it is recommended to get breeding pairs that you get a group of 6 or more. I have a trio, and they do just fine. It is enough to school (which they do), but there were no pairs that formed, so they are super mellow.

Give them a lot of pockets in the foliage and hardscaping that they can define a territory if you do happen to get a pair. This will reduce the chances of terrorizing the entire tank, and just chasing wandering fish out of their area.

If you end up with a spawning pair, you should rehome them together, if they are terrorizing your tank- or get them a 40 gallon tank of their own to be the sole inhabitants of. Splitting them up is an option, but also a little mean, IMO... it is better that they stay together, and are just removed from the tank.

I absolutely ADORE my angelfish, and highly recommend them for community tanks. They are very large, graceful, and lovely "centerpiece fish". If you are going to house them with neon tetras, or any small tetras- get those schools established first, then add baby angels to the tank. They grow RIDICULOUSLY fast, so they won't be small long. Angels are notorious eaters of smaller fish, if they aren't raised with them. Mine live with neons and xray tetras, and don't even give them a second glance, since they grew up with them, and don't see them as a food source. Neon tetras are their natural food source in the wild, so, you have to be careful with this stocking, and make sure to set it up the right way. Established small fish, baby angels after they are established, and well fed angelfish significantly lessen the chances of the neons, or other small fish (tetras, guppies, etc) becoming food- I haven't lost 1 yet, and it has been a year, maybe even a little more.

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If I had an available 110 gallon tank, and I wasn't going to turn it into the freakin' sweetest goldfish aquarium in history (which is what i'd probably do!) I'd stock it with fresh or brackish water puffers. Either a single Fahaka puffer, or 3 Green Spotted puffers would be how I'd go. But I have a serious weakness for da puffs.

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Wow thanks Jamie! That's what i needed to hear because i think they are amazingly gorgeous fish! I kinda hope i don't get a spawning pair because i have no idea what to do with the babies O.o I'd probably get three of them then...

I'd really like some very colorful fish. Like blues, yellows and reds so they will pop in the tank so it's nice to see that there is a lot to choose from! Just have to do some research on types of foods and other things needed.... This ifs exciting and a challenge all at the same time!

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You're welcome! Another tip- if you're going to try to stock bettas and angels in the same tank, do it the opposite way of how you would add fish if housing with tetras. Have larger, established angels, and then add your betta(s). The bettas might try to harass a small angelfish, due to them being slower moving and etc., but they stay away from the big ones, for the most part. Femals bettas do well with angels- a male betta would need a lot of plant cover to stake a territory, to even consider this stocking choice. In a 110 gallon, you should have minimal problems, if you wanted to go for it, though. In a smaller tank, the problem you may run into would be the betta being their usual amount of territorial, and starting a fight with the angels- since the angels are cichlids, they usually won't back down in a territorial dispute, if provoked. Hence the having lots of areas that can be claimed as territory. From my experience, female bettas are easier to establish peacefully with angels than males- but, I had a few really psycho males, when trying to keep them with angels. Other members here & on a few other forums successfully keep angels and male bettas, in larger, well planted tanks, without any issues. I don't recommend angels with the fin nipping barbs, or the more aggressive fin nipping tetras. It never works out well, and the nippers terrorize the large, slow moving angels... some of them get killed by the angels, and the angels sometimes don't last long, themselves, due to not being really long lived in stressful situations. They are a more delicate fish.

I really like the omega one super color flakes and shrimp pellets for my community tank as a staple, and added frozen foods (bloodworms, tubifex worms, etc) a few times a week. My angels went from dime sized in body to half dollar/silver dollar in less than 6 mos with these foods. It keeps my lady bettas, electric blue dwarf gouramis, and creamsicle lyretail mollies nice and brightly colored, as well. :D

Have you thought about doing a discus tank? I LOVE my angels, but if it is bold color & graceful swimming you want, discus (who are "cousins" of angels) may be something to look into. A 110 gallon tank could be quite the discus display!

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Have you thought about doing a discus tank? I LOVE my angels, but if it is bold color & graceful swimming you want, discus (who are "cousins" of angels) may be something to look into. A 110 gallon tank could be quite the discus display!

Now THAT would be awesome! I love discus but have never kept them because their care needs sound overwhelming. But a 110 gallon tank with big discus? Stunning!!!

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Oh man..... I think I love the Discus even more!! Hmmmm okay, I've been looking all day today and I'm going to throw out a possible community of fishies...

First one is the beautiful Checkerboard Discus. They are peaceful and fit in the pH zone of my water :) These guys would be the star of the show! I would either have to find a mated pair or get a school of 5+ I'd probably go for a pair...

Next the Boesemani Rainbow fish. Also peaceful fits in the pH zone. These are colorful, hence the name, I'd get five or more of them for their school.

Next, some Topsail Platies. Peaceful, in the pH zone. I would also have 5+ of these.

Last would be one little Zebra Pleco. Peaceful but I don't know about pH level for them...

What do you think?

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Look into the temp requirements for each of those species to make sure they are compatible. Discus require very warm water when compared to a lot of the other fish species. Discus do best in larger numbers, are very social, and it is recommended to keep them in schools of 6+. You will want to keep them in this recommendation, if you want to see the best activity from your discus. Kept in smaller numbers, they can hide a lot, and be pretty shy. In schools of 6, they will even hand feed, with time. Most ppl keep them as a species only tank, and they really thrive this way. Careful selection of tank mates, though, and I think you could have some other fish in there.

The rainbow fish may be a little too boisterous for discus. Rainbows are listed as peaceful, but I have also seen they have a reputation to bully other fish- discus are easily bullied, and shy. They also do not do particularly well with larger, fast moving fish.

As an alternative, have you seen the pearl gouramis? They are a small, very peaceful, slow moving gourami variety that are really pretty. Maybe 4 of those? Info on the pearl gouramis: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/profiles/pearl-gourami/#fullPicture465

Another alternative are the congo tetras. They have the same kind of shimmery rainbow effect going on as the rainbow fish, but are a very peaceful and shy, schooling tetra. They could be kept at 80 degrees, and need the same super clean water as discus. Here is their info: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/profiles/congo-tetra/ the pic on there doesn't nearly do them justice, though... scroll down to their pic on this page and look, instead: http://aquaverse.in/about-us.php?id=129

Bloodfin, rummynose, neon, and/or cardinal tetras would also be compatible. Any of the peaceful tetra varieties would work- be careful with tetras, though. They look cute, but some of them are absolute nightmares and pretty aggressive, ind of like barbs. Harlequin, Hengels, or Lambchop rasboras could also make suitable tank mates.

Personally, I would not try to keep mollies/platties with discus. They can get pretty pushy and boisterous, and there is a possibility they will eat all of the food, when keeping a large number of them, even with the size difference. My 2 mollies are the most aggressive fish in the tank- and that is comparing them to bettas, gouramis, and angels. Discus aren't super fast eaters, and mollies/platies are. That, and they are super high waste producers for their size, and won't help with keeping the bioload down in the tank, maintaining the pristine water discus need. You could give it a try, and it may work... but, I wouldn't do this match, personally.

Just a heads up, looking for a mated pair of discus will probably run you in the hundreds of dollars for just the 2 of them. If you just go to a really good, clean, and reputable LFS, you could get your entire colony of 6 for the price of a mated pair, and very well might end up with mated pairs from your choices. They will get sassy when spawning, but not as bad as angels or aggressive cichlids. Give them plant cover, and they should do fine.

Edited by JamieMonster
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I really like the pearl Gourami's! Pretty! I will have to take a look at the others when I'm not on my phone.

So with the discus'... would it be okay to have the six of them in the 110 gallon and have the other schools? It wouldn't be too much? And the zebra guy is okay? I think he's cute... :)

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Beyond common, bristlenose, or rubberlip varieties, I am not really all that schooled on plecos! Although, I do love them all. LOL. Is the zebra a smaller variety, or one of them that gets to 2 feet long? I keep a common plec with my angelfish, and they do fine. The zebra plec with discus would need to be researched, though. Some of the more aggressive plec species can latch on to them to munch their slime coats, apparently. Not saying you couldn't, it would just need to be researched. :)

What kind of filtration do you have on your tank? It will need to be heavily filtered, like for goldies, to keep discus. Not a super strong current, though. They are a little tricky. A cansiter filter with the spray bar pointed at the tank wall behind where it is mounted would work well.

Using the baseline guide from aqadvisor, 6 discus, 4 pearl gouramis, 12 small 1 1/2- 2" species tetras (cardinal, bloodfin, etc), or 8 4" congo tetras, and 1 zebra pleco would put you at 92- 95% stocking for a 110 gallon tank.

As long as you have good filtration, I think you would be just fine, with this stocking level. The temps between the discus and congo tetras is borderline. You'd have to keep the tank at 81, which is the bottom end for discus, and top end for congos. It could be done, though. Some of the other tetras might work better to add in a nice school for some motion in the tank.

Cardinals, glowlights, and neons look pretty striking in a large shoal. You could do a school of 20 neons in that tank, and keep the stocking level at 94%, with the 6 discus, 4 gouramis, and 1 pleco. That would be a very impressive, and shimmery shoal, with a lot of nice movement. Neons look particularly fantastic next to the bright green of planted aquaria. They kind of get made fun of as little kids' fish- but they are lovely, and a lot of bang for the buck in very large groups. They tend to be fairly tight shoalers, too, so you'd get a nice, large swoop of movement when they swim through the tank. The tank temp would be 82-83 degrees for these fish, and is in their comfort zone for all species.

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EDIT: aqadvisor is wonky. I just went in and readded the stock levels for the 20 neons, 6 discus, 4 moonlights, and a zebra plec, because that seemed weird to me, & it was like 110%... still do-able with heavy filtration, but slightly overstocked. Do 2 water changes a week, and you should be OK, since tetras are small. With 12 neons, it would be at 98% stocking level, and with 15, it would be at 100%. I hate it that you get different numbers when using that site, sometimes. I know its just a general guideline tool, but, it's still a pain. You really have to keep an eye on parameters with discus, though. They are a high maintenance, experienced caregiver fish.

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Fish will absolutely prefer different levels in your tank!

My neons prefer the lower part of the center third of the tank (75 gallon), if that makes sense. Harlequin rasboras like the top third, but not the very surface - that's the home of guppies, green fire tetras and my lone pencilfish. Blue ram cichlids (Mikrogeophagus ramirezi) spend most of their time within 4-6" of the bottom, while corydoras cats busy themselves between the stems of the plants at gravel level. Rainbowfish duel with the currents in the top half, while my pearl gourami spends most of her time in the bottom half. (With occasional visits to the surface for a bubble...) My green zebra lace angelfish is usually just about dead-center between the gravel and the waves.

Most of those fish are out in the open most of the time, but the black phantom tetras and emperor tets tend to lurk among the foliage, periodically making a surprise appearance.

Your 110 is going to be _awesome_!

~Bruce

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Oh I'm looking forward to seeing what you decide on and get. Looking forward to seeing your 110 tank completed.

Also, seeing your 55 goldfish tank w/all four of your goldies in it.

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Forget the community Get an Oscar or two and a common pleco and maybe a couple JD's.

I saw some of those at the pet store today.... they have a huge tank with three of them and OMG they are huge and almost scary....

Beyond common, bristlenose, or rubberlip varieties, I am not really all that schooled on plecos! Although, I do love them all. LOL. Is the zebra a smaller variety, or one of them that gets to 2 feet long? I keep a common plec with my angelfish, and they do fine. The zebra plec with discus would need to be researched, though. Some of the more aggressive plec species can latch on to them to munch their slime coats, apparently. Not saying you couldn't, it would just need to be researched. :)

What kind of filtration do you have on your tank? It will need to be heavily filtered, like for goldies, to keep discus. Not a super strong current, though. They are a little tricky. A cansiter filter with the spray bar pointed at the tank wall behind where it is mounted would work well.

Using the baseline guide from aqadvisor, 6 discus, 4 pearl gouramis, 12 small 1 1/2- 2" species tetras (cardinal, bloodfin, etc), or 8 4" congo tetras, and 1 zebra pleco would put you at 92- 95% stocking for a 110 gallon tank.

As long as you have good filtration, I think you would be just fine, with this stocking level. The temps between the discus and congo tetras is borderline. You'd have to keep the tank at 81, which is the bottom end for discus, and top end for congos. It could be done, though. Some of the other tetras might work better to add in a nice school for some motion in the tank.

Cardinals, glowlights, and neons look pretty striking in a large shoal. You could do a school of 20 neons in that tank, and keep the stocking level at 94%, with the 6 discus, 4 gouramis, and 1 pleco. That would be a very impressive, and shimmery shoal, with a lot of nice movement. Neons look particularly fantastic next to the bright green of planted aquaria. They kind of get made fun of as little kids' fish- but they are lovely, and a lot of bang for the buck in very large groups. They tend to be fairly tight shoalers, too, so you'd get a nice, large swoop of movement when they swim through the tank. The tank temp would be 82-83 degrees for these fish, and is in their comfort zone for all species.

I think that I like the combination of the 6 Discus', the 8 congo tetras, the 4 pearl gouramis, and the zebra pleco. IT would put me at 70% it looks like. The pleco is a little guy he'd get like 3 inches and I've read that he's pretty shy, really love driftwood, and seems to leave the discus' alone.

Thanks for the filtration advice I've been reading about the discus and how people do 25% water changes everyday.... That's a lot of water... But then other places have said that with good filteration lots of plants and maybe two of the zebra guys (I mean it is a huge tank...) it would be less water changes.

Fish will absolutely prefer different levels in your tank!

My neons prefer the lower part of the center third of the tank (75 gallon), if that makes sense. Harlequin rasboras like the top third, but not the very surface - that's the home of guppies, green fire tetras and my lone pencilfish. Blue ram cichlids (Mikrogeophagus ramirezi) spend most of their time within 4-6" of the bottom, while corydoras cats busy themselves between the stems of the plants at gravel level. Rainbowfish duel with the currents in the top half, while my pearl gourami spends most of her time in the bottom half. (With occasional visits to the surface for a bubble...) My green zebra lace angelfish is usually just about dead-center between the gravel and the waves.

Most of those fish are out in the open most of the time, but the black phantom tetras and emperor tets tend to lurk among the foliage, periodically making a surprise appearance.

Your 110 is going to be _awesome_!

~Bruce

Ah! That sounds awesome!

Oh I'm looking forward to seeing what you decide on and get. Looking forward to seeing your 110 tank completed.

Also, seeing your 55 goldfish tank w/all four of your goldies in it.

Hehe I'm excited for my goldfish babies to be together :D

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Decently planted tanks work well for discus, and do mean less water changes. They like amazon sword plants a lot, like angelfish do. Honestly, I do think they get a little bit of exaggeration when talking about just HOW much maintenance they need. I have researched keeping them for a couple of yrs now, and am waiting for the free tank space to get some. Most places I have referenced don't say they need a back breaking maintenance routine- but are a fish for experienced keepers. Everyone I know that have actually kept them seem to agree with that standpoint, and that some of the info out there is a bit exaggerated beyond their actual needs. You won't have to do daily 25% changes. LOL- heavy filtration, yes.. they will be fine with 2 25% changes a week, or 1 50%. Just make sure to REALLY match your water temps- they are pretty temperature sensitive. To pair them with the congos, you'll have to keep the tank at about 81, which will be fine for both species. They're technically borderline compatible with tank temp, but they would both do fine at 81 degrees.

I think it will be a gorgeous tank, with the fish you are talking about. Lots of color, and nice movement. Can't wait to see pics! :D

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Decently planted tanks work well for discus, and do mean less water changes. They like amazon sword plants a lot, like angelfish do. Honestly, I do think they get a little bit of exaggeration when talking about just HOW much maintenance they need. I have researched keeping them for a couple of yrs now, and am waiting for the free tank space to get some. Most places I have referenced don't say they need a back breaking maintenance routine- but are a fish for experienced keepers. Everyone I know that have actually kept them seem to agree with that standpoint, and that some of the info out there is a bit exaggerated beyond their actual needs. You won't have to do daily 25% changes. LOL- heavy filtration, yes.. they will be fine with 2 25% changes a week, or 1 50%. Just make sure to REALLY match your water temps- they are pretty temperature sensitive. To pair them with the congos, you'll have to keep the tank at about 81, which will be fine for both species. They're technically borderline compatible with tank temp, but they would both do fine at 81 degrees.

I think it will be a gorgeous tank, with the fish you are talking about. Lots of color, and nice movement. Can't wait to see pics! :D

You are like my new tropical fish friend :rofl You seriously rock Jamie! I think I will start up on that combo when the 55 gets up and running.

The plan is I'll plant first and let the plants grow and get strong. Then get the littler fish first and bring in the beautiful discus fishies last :) The pet store in town has the congos and pearls I believe (I'm proud to say I have a really good pet store... I constantly see them doing water changes and I watched them save a giant goldfish who's owner brought it in swimming upside down! I trust them to have good fish and advice) I would have to get the tigers and discus online... For now I'm going to be saving for the new filteration I would need and also saving for the decor (so excited for that part!)and the expensive discus :krazy::yikes

I've got a pretty strong routine already with my goldfish of course so it sounds like I would just have to be as stricked with my water changes and water tests on my tropical friends as well!! I will keep everyone posted as the journey begins! :tbanana

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Decently planted tanks work well for discus, and do mean less water changes. They like amazon sword plants a lot, like angelfish do. Honestly, I do think they get a little bit of exaggeration when talking about just HOW much maintenance they need. I have researched keeping them for a couple of yrs now, and am waiting for the free tank space to get some. Most places I have referenced don't say they need a back breaking maintenance routine- but are a fish for experienced keepers. Everyone I know that have actually kept them seem to agree with that standpoint, and that some of the info out there is a bit exaggerated beyond their actual needs. You won't have to do daily 25% changes. LOL- heavy filtration, yes.. they will be fine with 2 25% changes a week, or 1 50%. Just make sure to REALLY match your water temps- they are pretty temperature sensitive. To pair them with the congos, you'll have to keep the tank at about 81, which will be fine for both species. They're technically borderline compatible with tank temp, but they would both do fine at 81 degrees.

I think it will be a gorgeous tank, with the fish you are talking about. Lots of color, and nice movement. Can't wait to see pics! :D

You are like my new tropical fish friend :rofl You seriously rock Jamie! I think I will start up on that combo when the 55 gets up and running.

The plan is I'll plant first and let the plants grow and get strong. Then get the littler fish first and bring in the beautiful discus fishies last :) The pet store in town has the congos and pearls I believe (I'm proud to say I have a really good pet store... I constantly see them doing water changes and I watched them save a giant goldfish who's owner brought it in swimming upside down! I trust them to have good fish and advice) I would have to get the tigers and discus online... For now I'm going to be saving for the new filteration I would need and also saving for the decor (so excited for that part!)and the expensive discus :krazy::yikes

I've got a pretty strong routine already with my goldfish of course so it sounds like I would just have to be as stricked with my water changes and water tests on my tropical friends as well!! I will keep everyone posted as the journey begins! :tbanana

YAAAAYYY!!! Always glad to help, my friend!

You are going to want a very cycled, and very stable tank for both the congos, and the discus. Having the gourami for your first addition would be your best bet, and do a fishless cycle, with your plants, and using cycled filter media from an established tank- let that run, even after looking fully cycled for a few weeks before adding the congos- I would add them in 2 groups of 4. When ready for your discus, probably add them 2 at a time, so you don't shock your filter, even in that large tank.

Online is a good place to look for discus- I have seen ppl listing them on Craigslist, as well. Ebay seems to be a good place to look, for a little bit less $$$- just make sure to ask A LOT of questions re: how they are cared for, and ask to see pics of their tanks that the fish are kept in. Discus can be prone to a few diseases, which adds to their expense, if you have to treat them right away.

I'm totally having fun with this- can't wait to see your tank! :D

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Wow thanks Jamie! That's what i needed to hear because i think they are amazingly gorgeous fish! I kinda hope i don't get a spawning pair because i have no idea what to do with the babies O.o I'd probably get three of them then...

Keep a pleco in the same tank. Whenever my pair spawned, the pleco would eat the eggs off the spawning surface over night :lol

In a 110g tank you can keep even a common pleco if you are into big fish. If not, you could a few of the smaller growing varieties in that tank, and you can be quite sure that no angelfish offspring will occur :)

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Yikes! I was reading this great thread and drooling about planning such a set up, that I forgot I was draining the tank. Next thing I know, fluffy was splashing to let me know that the water was getting too low! :blink:

I've really enjoyed reading about your plans and look forward to seeing the pics.

Mj

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

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Forget the community Get an Oscar or two and a common pleco and maybe a couple JD's.

I saw some of those at the pet store today.... they have a huge tank with three of them and OMG they are huge and almost scary....

Not scary. They are like having a wet puppy. Only less trouble. lol

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Yikes! I was reading this great thread and drooling about planning such a set up, that I forgot I was draining the tank. Next thing I know, fluffy was splashing to let me know that the water was getting too low! :blink:

I've really enjoyed reading about your plans and look forward to seeing the pics.

Mj

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

Yikes! I was reading this great thread and drooling about planning such a set up, that I forgot I was draining the tank. Next thing I know, fluffy was splashing to let me know that the water was getting too low! :blink:

I've really enjoyed reading about your plans and look forward to seeing the pics.

Mj

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

LOL - I have to get the kids from school, and making lunch for everyone and laundry .. had to set a timer for it all, cause I was so involved in reading this post! Jamie you ROCK!

I cant WAIT to see this finished tank. I am super jellious. I think in need a 100 gal tropical tank now ..........

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