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Are my snails..Apple snails?


dankriscurly

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Got these 2snails (Marisa cornuarietis)

But are they also part of the Apple snail family?

I notice some algae growing on their shell and I remove it using some filter wool to do it..

I hope im doing it the right way...

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Btw how do u feed snails?

I had them for 10weeks and I never feed them specialize snails food & thought they will get frm the driftwood/plants and I notice they are very active thru-out my 5x2x2ft goldfish tank..2013-02-24234530.png

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The local snail lady (there but for the grace of ....) sells these. They have a genus and species name that is different from that of apple snails but she every now and then lumps them with the apples when she describes their needs and habits. They eat vegetable matter - your plants, some algae/algae wafers, vegetables.

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Hello :) They look like a type of ramshorn, but I don't know what kind. :/

I'm no snail expert, but I know they need a cuttlefish bone for calcium, and you can supplement their diet with veggies, repashy, ect. :)

Another member with snail experience will chime in. :)

Edit: Sniped by Susan :P

Edited by teleSC
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Yep- teleSC is right. Those are ramshorn snails, and not a member of the "apple family". Keep an eye out for eggs, as those guys can reproduce heavily. They usually only do this, though, when being fed a lot, and can overpopulate your tank if being overfed.

They will eat your dying and decaying plant leaves, avfuchs, algae, food scraps that the fish miss, and etc, but also enjoy fresh veggies such as cucumber and zucchini (you can wedge slices of these fresh veggies under a rock or piece of drift wood at the bottom of your tank, or clip them to the side with a "veggie clip"). Calcium supplementation is also a good idea when keeping snails. Just keep in mind that the more you feed, the more eggs they can lay, which will eventually hatch. Snails don't require heavy feeding, so supplementing the stuff already available in the tank that they will eat with fresh veggies once a week should do the trick!

Good luck with your snails- they are quite lovely!

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But I don't think they are ramshorns either. Their name is Marisa cornuartietis. What we call posthorns (but look like your ramshorns) are Planorbis corneus. I agree that they look more like ramshorns but Heidi (snail lady) seems to think that they have needs more like apples.

Sorry this is funky font. I copied the latin names from Heidi's information.

Edited by motherredcap
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They are technically Ampullariidae family (which is the "apple snail" family), unlike most other ramshorns who are of the planorbidae family... but, these guys lay clear egg clutches under the water, unlike most of the "apple snails" who lay the brightly colored clutches above the water line. The jury is also out as to whether these variety are asexual (like "ramshorn snails"), or defined gender (like "apple snails")- some sources say they are defined gender, some say "unknown", so hard to say, there. I don't keep this particular variety of snails, I keep the pomacea diffusa variety of the Ampullariidae genus (mystery snails), but I have also had blue and pink ramshorns, in the past.

This is one of those instances where its kind of in a gray area- they are technically in the apple family, but share many characteristics with the common ramshorn snail varieties. I'm not sure what, exactly, makes them in the Ampullariidae family over the Planorbidae family (it could be something as simple as the number of shell whorls, or general internal shell structure- the taxonomy of a species can be weird like that, and definitely NOT my forte)... but, they are kind in the middle. Somewhere when they trace their origins back with the linnaean classification- they found they stemmed from the ancestors of apple snails over the more common ramshorn snails. They, apparently, share characteristics with both, though.

I'd treat them more like ramshorns, due to the clear, under water egg clutches that are hard to see and remove, and the fact that their gender may be asexual- like the Planorbidae ramshorns, and can lead to tank overpopulation quickly if you don't keep an eye on them. I'm not POSITIVE that these guys will overbreed, like the common ramshorn snails can, but due to the eggs being harder to find and remove than most apple snail varieties- it is probably best to err on the side of caution, and make sure to not overfeed your tank.

Regardless to their classification, many freshwater snail species require pretty much the same kind of care, so you should be good to go with using the general guidelines for snail care for these guys as you would for common ramshorns, or one of the common "apple snail" varieities (which is about the same for both of them). If you would need to treat one of them for illness, that is where you'll have to look into specifics for care. ;)

http://applesnail.net/content/species/marisa_cornuarietis.htm

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Interesting Jaime. Heidi is a local snail enthusiast who has a Norwegian language snail page. I suspect that Heidi feels these are 'defined gender' snails.

I have found a few other sources who also feel they are defined gender. I won't speak, myself, as to if they are or not, just simply based on the fact that there is information saying "yes" and information saying "don't know" about the topic. Add to that the fact that I have never kept them, personally, so I can't give any input from an informed point of view as to which is accurate- so I just say "don't know personally, but some experts think they are".

I would definitely trust the Snail Lady's word over mine. I am far from a snail expert- just a nerdy girl, who finds some snails adorable, enjoys keeping and caring for them, and has too much free time to read a bunch of stuff about them. LOL. :hug

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Truthfully, Heidi is just a nerdy woman, who finds ALL snails adorable. She's got some super-crush on these orange bodied ones (they are sort of neat) and tank after tank of snailies.

Orange bodied ones... rabbit snails, perhaps? Look like giant mayalsian trumpet snails, in shell shape, with orange bodies and kind of adorable, marginally rabbit-like, faces?

rabbit snails= http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=145625

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Researched it out! Ok, these guys are members of the Ampullariidae because they have a opurculum (trap door that can seal the shell opening), and most importantly because they have both a gill and a lung, that makes respiration both fully submerged, or while fully out of the water possible. Apparently, it is the gill/lung combo that is the determining factor to the Ampullariidae family. This genus is also, apparently, the largest in all of the snail species, and has 6-8 branches, depending on the source you are looking at. Common ramshorn snails of the planorbidae family only have a lung, and breathe by gathering air pockets with skin folds in their foot, and then storing it in a special pocket inside their shells.They also lack an opurculum, which makes them unable to be out of the water for any considerable amount of time without drying up. There are also 2 other varieties of the Ampullariidae genus that lay eggs below water, but these are not often seen in the aquarium trade, unless someone happened to just catch wild ones and chuck them in their tank. These other 2 varieties have the traditional apple snail shape, though, and not the disc shape, which is unique to the marisa variety of the Ampullariidae snails. A couple more of the sources I just looked into also said the "gaint ramshorns" of defined gender, so that will help with population control.

Interesting to learn that these are an apple snail variety, as I have always seen them sold and listed as "Columbian Ramshorns", and lumped in with the planorbidae species snails. I can see why they are, as they do share characteristics of both species. Thanks for clearing that up, MRC. :D

p.s. many of the sources also said these guys are voracious plant eaters, as well, others said they will only eat delicate plants- so, watch your plants to make sure, if you have them in a planted tank. :)

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Truthfully, Heidi is just a nerdy woman, who finds ALL snails adorable. She's got some super-crush on these orange bodied ones (they are sort of neat) and tank after tank of snailies.

Orange bodied ones... rabbit snails, perhaps? Look like giant mayalsian trumpet snails, in shell shape, with orange bodies and kind of adorable, marginally rabbit-like, faces?

rabbit snails= http://www.plantedta...ad.php?t=145625

Yes, Jaime, those! They are sweet looking.

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Aww- cute. No worries, it is totally normal for them to not move much when introduced to a new environment. Congrats on the new snaily friend! :D

I wonder if Apple snail have this habit of digging up a hole in gravel and rest inside?

Both my Apple snails did that...

strange ??

Edited by dankriscurly
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Aww- cute. No worries, it is totally normal for them to not move much when introduced to a new environment. Congrats on the new snaily friend! :D

I wonder if Apple snail have this habit of digging up a hole in gravel and rest inside?

Both my Apple snails did that...

strange ¿?

The ramshorn shaped ones, or the mystery snails that you just got?

I keep mystery snails. None of mine have ever dug out a space in the gravel, but I have heard a couple of times where others have described this kind of behavior from their mystery snails. I wouldn't consider it to be "normal behavior", myself, but I have heard of ppl who have had snails that did this, so it isn't necessarily abnormal, either. To my understanding, it usually means they are hiding. It makes sense for them to hide for the first couple of weeks in a new tank, so I really wouldn't worry too much, as long as they are coming out a little (sometimes, this will mostly be when the tank light is off, until they get used to the tank).

There are a few species of snails who regularly burrow into the gravel to live there, but mystery snails are not some of them.

The ramshorn shaped apple snails- well, this could very well be normal for them. I am not familiar with they way they behave at all. :)

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Oh its e 2 yellow Apple snails I just bought today...they are rather active with my lights on too..I have yet to see them climb up the glass tank but only on the gravel..

I have 2x ramshorn and 2x apple snails

Im not sure if I shld feed them any special food at all?

I heard of people feeding pleco disc pellet or cabbage. ..

I do have a driftwood and ferns in my tank for them though....

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