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Ghost Shrimp Help


Artemis

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I have 3 ghost shrimp in with my 5 goldies, 2 females with eggs and 1 male. The females' eggs are black and unfertilized. I don't want them to become eggbound. Will they be fine if they don't lay?

Edited by Artemis
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Ghost shrimp will not last long with goldfish. 2 scenerios will happen- #1, the goldfish will likely eat them. #2, the shrimp will be so terrified of the potential of being eaten by the goldfish, they will never come out of hiding, and will starve. I had #2 happen in my tank, since I added the shrimp when the goldfish were tiny babies, and they didn't recognize the shrimp as a food source, and I kept the goldies very well fed to avoid curiosity. Several of my shrimp starved because they would not leave a plant, and couldn't get to food. I had to move them to the 10 gallon tank, where they are flourishing. Since my goldies were very young, they didn't eat the shrimp. Seeing my goldfish now, grown to much larger, I seriously doubt that arrangement would last, and they would probably end up eating the shrimp, even with being raised with them. They would decide to chew on one, discover they are tasty, and that would be it.

As far as the breeding goes- you should get a larger colony, if you want babies to survive. About 3 males and 6 females. The eggs should be green or clear for palaemonates ghost shrimp (the kind that can breed in fresh water), if you have a different ghost shrimp species, you might not have successful breeding take place. Some ghost shrimp require a transition from fresh to brackish and back to fresh.... others require fresh to brackish to full marine and then back to brackish and back to fresh at very specific points in development for successful breeding. Even with paleamonates variety, you aren't going to see many babies survive, and you'll need to have a "dirty" tank and have a lot of java moss, or other heavy, fluffy plant cover to see it happen. They aren't prolific breeders like some of the other freshwater ornamental shrimp varieties.

EDIT- the eggs are on the outside of their bodies- they won't become egg bound. ;)

Edited by JamieMonster
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Ghost shrimp will not last long with goldfish. 2 scenerios will happen- #1, the goldfish will likely eat them. #2, the shrimp will be so terrified of the potential of being eaten by the goldfish, they will never come out of hiding, and will starve. I had #2 happen in my tank, since I added the shrimp when the goldfish were tiny babies, and they didn't recognize the shrimp as a food source, and I kept the goldies very well fed to avoid curiosity. Several of my shrimp starved because they would not leave a plant, and couldn't get to food. I had to move them to the 10 gallon tank, where they are flourishing. Since my goldies were very young, they didn't eat the shrimp. Seeing my goldfish now, grown to much larger, I seriously doubt that arrangement would last, and they would probably end up eating the shrimp, even with being raised with them. They would decide to chew on one, discover they are tasty, and that would be it.

As far as the breeding goes- you should get a larger colony, if you want babies to survive. About 3 males and 6 females. The eggs should be green or clear for palaemonates ghost shrimp (the kind that can breed in fresh water), if you have a different ghost shrimp species, you might not have successful breeding take place. Some ghost shrimp require a transition from fresh to brackish and back to fresh.... others require fresh to brackish to full marine and then back to brackish and back to fresh at very specific points in development for successful breeding. Even with paleamonates variety, you aren't going to see many babies survive, and you'll need to have a "dirty" tank and have a lot of java moss, or other heavy, fluffy plant cover to see it happen. They aren't prolific breeders like some of the other freshwater ornamental shrimp varieties.

EDIT- the eggs are on the outside of their bodies- they won't become egg bound. ;)

I agree! I once put 10 shrimp in with my goldfish and the shrimp were gone the next day! I also saw 2 fat goldfish swimming around... :hmm

Anyway with the breeding, I have had NO luck with them! They act like they will and then nothing! :idont

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Ok, I have a 10 gal I can move them to. The eggs are pretty dark and they hide under a rock cave I have so they might be dark green? They were sold as feeder ghost shrimp, I don't know what type that is. Would a 10 gal hold all of them? And how do I tell the males from females?

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Ok, I have a 10 gal I can move them to. The eggs are pretty dark and they hide under a rock cave I have so they might be dark green? They were sold as feeder ghost shrimp, I don't know what type that is. Would a 10 gal hold all of them? And how do I tell the males from females?

A 10 gallon would DEFINITELY hold all of them. Shrimp are super low bioload, so the stocking requirements for them is different than with fish. You are going to want to make sure the tank is entirely cycled & stable before transferring them, as shrimp are sensitive to parameter fluctuations. They do best in a naturally planted tank, and if you want babies- don't go too nuts with the substrate cleaning, or the babies won't find food. You don't want it to be TOO dirty (you'll get "bugs" in your tank, if it is), but also not immaculate, either. I just don't vac around the area where the plants are, both for feeding the plants, and for the baby shrimp, if I have any. A sponge guard over the filter intake is also a good idea, and some hornwort would be a good plant for them to breed in, as well as vals, grasses, and java moss.

Did you buy them at Petsmart? Most of the "feeder" varieties from the major LFSs are Palaemonates Sp. Those are what I have, and they have successfully bred in my tank the past year twice. If you want prolific breeders, add some red cherry shrimp- they are like little rabbits with cranking out the babies, and are very pretty. Heavy plant cover is the key to having the little ones survive, though. :D

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Oh- sorry... males and females. It is hard to tell the genders apart when they are small, like when sold at the LFS. Sometimes there will be berried females in there, and you know they're female- the males are harder in a juvie tank, since males and juvie females look the same. For adult shrimp, though, you can tell the females and males apart from their size. Mature females are larger and stockier than males, and a lot of the time they are "berried", or carrying eggs. If you buy a dozen of them, you would hopefully get a good mix of male and female shrimp to populate the tank. It isn't a guarantee, of course, but with that large of a group, you should get a mix of genders.

Edited by JamieMonster
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No not from PetC0. A little store near our house sells them for 50c each. There are adults and young. I have quite a few spawning mops for them to hide in. Do they need substrate? I'll get on it soon

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