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Where to donate Black Moor?


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Right now I have my Black Moor in a 10 gallon for the time being. She needs a new home and I only have a single 20 gallon with my common in it. I plan to keep the common and give my Black Moor to someone who can take proper care of her. I suppose it's not as easy to donate Black Moors since you can't mix fancies with commons and most places with ponds have commons. If I was to give her to someone on the forum, how in the world would I contact them? I know it's important to be very careful contacting people you don't know from online. Fill me on what I need to know, thank you. (Also, thank you Koko for fixing the forum!)

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I would suggest you to keep the Moor. Donate the common/comet.

As for giving away on here, just make a post in Classified and hope someone closeby can meet and pickup. Shipping is tricky. Your dealing/transaction is on your own and you gotta go with common sense and instinct. If unsure, ask a Mod for their opinion/advice.

Did you try your local CL? Your local fish club?

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I would suggest you to keep the Moor. Donate the common/comet.

As for giving away on here, just make a post in Classified and hope someone closeby can meet and pickup. Shipping is tricky. Your dealing/transaction is on your own and you gotta go with common sense and instinct. If unsure, ask a Mod for their opinion/advice.

Did you try your local CL? Your local fish club?

I do not believe I have a local fish club. I know where I can donate my common. Thanks for the info Thunder.
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  • Regular Member

I too would suggest keeping the moor and giving away the common since a 20 gallon along would be too small for him. You could try posting on craigslist, I've bought and sold many things on that site without any problem, but this depends on your area and the people there, but with me, I don't have to worry about it much. Good luck!

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That 20 gallon is a little small for long term housing for a single tail, to be completely honest. It would be perfect for a forever home for a fancy goldfish, like your moor, though. Single tails just get very large (12+ inches) and need a lot of lateral swimming room, due to their constant swimming and activity. The fancies stay about half that size, and aren't quite as constantly active as a common/comet.

I know there are a lot of different opinions over stocking size and etc. for goldfish, some will say 20 gallons is perfectly fine for a single tail, as long as you're going to keep up with ample water changes as the fish grows. Others will say they need a minimum of 30 gallons for the first fish, and 15 each additional. And others, still, will say that they shouldn't be kept in anything smaller than a 40 gallon breeder tank (longer rather than taller) due to their need for room to swim as they become very large, adult fish. I tend to agree with that the fish need more room to swim, over the long term.

I understand completely how you love your fish,and feel attached. Just please understand that a single tail goldfish will get quite cramped in a 20 gallon tank, runs the possibility of becoming somewhat stunted, in the long term, and will require a lot more water maintenance to provide a healthy environment. A fancy variety would be healthy and happy in that tank for life, though.

Could you bring your remaining comet to the restaurant pond, where your other comets went to live and keep the moor? You could still go visit him/her there, and see him/her grow into a beautiful, large, happy fish, swimming free in a huge pond. Your single tail will be much happier in a much larger environment, and your moor will be happy for life in 20 gallons. :)

Edited by JamieMonster
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  • Regular Member

That 20 gallon is a little small for long term housing for a single tail, to be completely honest. It would be perfect for a forever home for a fancy goldfish, like your moor, though. Single tails just get very large (12+ inches) and need a lot of lateral swimming room, due to their constant swimming and activity. The fancies stay about half that size, and aren't quite as constantly active as a common/comet.

I know there are a lot of different opinions over stocking size and etc. for goldfish, some will say 20 gallons is perfectly fine for a single tail, as long as you're going to keep up with ample water changes as the fish grows. Others will say they need a minimum of 30 gallons for the first fish, and 15 each additional. And others, still, will say that they shouldn't be kept in anything smaller than a 40 gallon breeder tank (longer rather than taller) due to their need for room to swim as they become very large, adult fish. I tend to agree with that the fish need more room to swim, over the long term.

I understand completely how you love your fish,and feel attached. Just please understand that a single tail goldfish will get quite cramped in a 20 gallon tank, runs the possibility of becoming somewhat stunted, in the long term, and will require a lot more water maintenance to provide a healthy environment. A fancy variety would be healthy and happy in that tank for life, though.

Could you bring your remaining comet to the restaurant pond, where your other comets went to live and keep the moor? You could still go visit him/her there, and see him/her grow into a beautiful, large, happy fish, swimming free in a huge pond. Your single tail will be much happier in a much larger environment, and your moor will be happy for life in 20 gallons. :)

That's where I'm bringing her. I think I'll say when I get there "Have room for one more?" LOL! It'll give me an opportunity to take pictures too. Maybe I'll get my bucket back...just kidding.
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Keep the fish you like the best. There is no way you will know which fish might get too big for the tank until it happens.

I have only one common who would be physically crowded in a 20 gallon tank, and all of my fish are pond raised so they are probably larger than what an aquarium fish would be. However, a large fancy goldfish can certainly have trouble maneuvering in a small tank. Fish with short, thick bodies do not bend well, and I have had a fancy struggling to turn around in a 20 gallon tank.

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