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amoore658

Will my floor support this?

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Hi guys, I've gone out and bought a 4 foot x 4 foot x 1 foot above ground swimming pool. It's very light weight, and is only a vinyl/rubber type material with light weight "poles" supporting it. When full, it will hold about 90 UK gallons (108 US?) I'm going to put it in a spare room on the second floor of my house. Considering how well the "pressure" will be spread out, should the floor support this? Thanks for your help Sorry this is all one big messy paragraph - my 'enter' button doesn't seem to be working

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We can't answer that question. It depends on the way the floor is constructed and supported. You need to bring in an expert in construction to evaluate the situation.

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I'd be concerned with that much exposed surface area that you're going to get a lot of evaporation, and possibly develop a mold problem in the house. Sure, people keep 100+ gallon tanks in homes all the time, even with bare tops- but, they have a much lesser surface area to evaporate the water off.

If you are going to do it, in addition to making sure the floors can support the weight, also make sure to have a pretty powerful dehumidifier in the room with the pool.

Get a consultation with a structural engineer- I can't say for sure, but larger weight loads are generally safer in the perimeter of rooms, by the weight bearing walls, and not in the center, where there is less structural support. Get a professional consult, though, to be certain.

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400 litres of water is 400kg, approx double what you would get in a bath. Quite a weight.

Edited by great_kahn

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I see the craziest posts on here sometimes. Get a few adults to go to the area and jump up and down if your worried about it. If you dont go through the floor, it's fine.

Depending on how the house is built, there could easily be a load bearing wall directly under the center of the upstairs room.

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Honestly anything over 55-60gallons I would consult a structural engineer for. If you don't know which way your joists run and which walls are load bearing than you can do permanent damage to a structure if you put too much stress on it. Not to mention 108 gallons is an awful lot of water if that pool leaks or collapses, which isn't a big deal outside, but will cause a good deal of damage inside. You also have to take into account how old the house is. Jumping up and down with a few adults will not simulate long term stress that a large quantity of water would exert. No one on here can tell you if it's safe or not (unless we have a structural engineer but I have yet to meet them) so the best thing would be to call someone out to look at the structure. For 100 gallons if your floor supports it a rubbermaid stock tank would probably be a better option

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Edited by Pearlscaleperfect

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Being a 4x4 square, it does not matter which way the floor joists are running. The rubbermaid container has less of a surface footprint and would be putting more psi on the floor. I wouldnt recomment it. 800 pounds worth of adults jumping up and down could put over 1600 lbs of weight on the floor. The quick strain of a heavier weight is far more likely to break something than gradually filling a pool to a much lesser weight.

I guess i would say if is a much older, and crappy house.... have it looked at.

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Depending on how old the house is you could also call the city building department and find out how much per square foot an upper floor is supposed to support as builders have to follow codes and have the house inspected while they build. 800lbs is alot of weight but if you think about furniture it can be quite heavy also, though usually not as heavy as 800lbs covering only 4 square feet.

Edited by cmclien

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It looks like this topic has gone quiet but here's a link to exactly the right web page on this topic entitled:

Residential Wood Framed Floors and Aquarium Weights by Kevin Bauman (StructureGuy),

[link removed by DNAlex]

Bottom line: you're probably OK but it depends on where you put the aquarium in the room, how much other weight you have on the floor in the room and a few other factors. Good luck.

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That's a terrific article. I love all the myths he discusses.

If you go into almost any house that is more than 50-60 years old and put a little ball on the floor, it will roll toward the center of the house. Sagging floors are regarded as damage, and overloaded floors result in sagging long before they break. I wouldn't consider putting a giant aquarium in a house without house jacks and beams underneath.

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It looks like this topic has gone quiet but here's a link to exactly the right web page on this topic entitled:

Residential Wood Framed Floors and Aquarium Weights by Kevin Bauman (StructureGuy),

[link removed by DNAlex]

Bottom line: you're probably OK but it depends on where you put the aquarium in the room, how much other weight you have on the floor in the room and a few other factors. Good luck.

I appreciate your input in this, but please know that links to other fish forums are prohibited.

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Many appologies. Won't do it again.

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Many appologies. Won't do it again.

It's not a problem. I am just reminding you of the rules. I understand that you are a new member.

Welcome, btw. Will you make an introduction thread, to say hello? I saw your posting on the cycling thread, and thought it was excellent!

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...a 4 foot x 4 foot x 1 foot above ground swimming pool...When full, it will hold about 90 UK gallons (108 US?) ...put it in a spare room on the second floor of my house...

90 Imperial gallons = 409 liters

1 liter of water = 2.204684 lb, so 409 liters weighs ~902 lb source (geek site, unrelated to aquaria)

If the pool is square (OP did not say), a 4'x4' pool would have a footprint of 16 ft sq

A filled square pool of 16 sq ft would have a weight of 56.36 lb/sq ft

If the pool is round, the footprint area = 2 x pi x r = 2 * 3.1415 * 2' = 12.566 sq ft,

A filled round pool of 12.566 sq ft would have a weight of 71.76 lb/sq ft

Both are reasonable weights for the structure of an average house.

For comparison my turtle tank is 3' x 1' x 2' and has ~40 US gallons of water (not full) and weighs 333.82 lb of water, tank weight excluded. My tank alone weights around 60 lb, I estimate

A filled rectangular tank of 3' x 1' = 3 sq ft and would have a weight of 111.29 lb/sq ft, far less than the vinyl pool.

Of more concern is the possibility of flood if there is a leak. 409 liters of water will certainly damage your floor and ceiling of the downstairs. The vinyl walls of this pool may not be durable enough to withstand the force of the water. If you put substrate into the pool ensure that there are no rocks. You could swim with your goldfish, I guess.

Though I am not a structural engineer, I would say you are good to go.

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